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John Smith

I want to see your Hamon

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Wakizaschi, Nambokucho style, hira zukuri

nagasa 43cm

Ichimonji yaki ire

chóji, utsuri, nie utsuri

W1.jpg

W4.jpg

W2.jpg

W3.jpg

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Just a try to show.....still working on :blink:/>/>/

 

The Moro-ha Tanto is in a early Stage of Uchgomori polishing and now the true Hamon is visible.

This Blade will comes later in a traditionel polishing. Then it will be nearly impossible to show the Hamon in pictures.

Ergebniss Uchigomori.jpg

Moro-ha Tanto Uchigomori.jpg

Edited by D.Kraft

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Hey guys,

 

I recently photographed a couple of knives for Rick Barrett, and I wanted to post them on this special Hamon thread. I can tell you from a photography point of view that Hamon lines are one of the hardest details to capture. It takes a bit of trial and error with lighting and knife position, but these are the results.

 

I have no clue what process Rick uses, but he's got it down to a science it seems.

 

Any comments are welcome and thanks for looking.

 

RickBarrett-W2-CarbonFiberMeteoriteKnife

RickBarrett-W2%26WoodFighter.jpg

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corey - beautiful images of great knives.

 

cwatson - that isn't my favorite style of knife, but you did a wonderful job of making it and the hamon is to die for. Really great work, even if I would have made a different style. The lines are clean and the blade shape is great.

kc

Edited by Kevin (The Professor)

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There are some amazing hamons on this thread!

 

Here are my first hamons done with Aldo's 1084 and furnace cement. Quenched in canola oil at 120-130F

 

46FDD4DC-740C-4055-9E69-49C977C377D3-817

 

E5D6DA32-EEA9-456D-A825-DBC716F93EFE-817

 

16E50258-5960-4F1A-AF07-3B3AD5553207-148

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From my recent WIP, a tanto in progress just polished by Jim Crawford here...

 

DSCF0376-XL.jpg

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i recently posted this in show & tell. 1075 in Parks.

 

it's a mystery to me quite how this hamon formed -- the one on the other side looks quite different (and similiar to my earlier projects), whereas this one has a wispy habuchi that i really love. i suspect this side was running a little cooler.

 

anyway, only my second blade and it should be interesting to see if i can recreate it.

 

tanto073_zps29892f56.jpg

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I really need to spend more time on this forum!

Inspiring stuff, but I may as well toss in one of mine anyway ;)

 

Slightly under 3 inch blade on a skinning knife forged from a section of used lumber mill band saw blade.

Treated as L6, clayed with a sifted 1:1 mix of local clay and wood ash.

Interupted quench in oil, then water.

Light lemmon juice etch and final rub with auto body polish.

20130128_111138-1-1-1-602628534.jpg

20130128_111228-1297053956.jpg

edit to reduce image size...

 

Edited by James Spurgeon

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nice reading

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SAM_4022_zpsdbd549ac.jpg

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Thought I'd share my most recent two here (even though I put them in their own post).

 

IMG_20130628_185224-1.jpg

 

Aldo's W2, heated to non-magnetic in a gas forge, quenched in 120ºF brine for 5 seconds, then out for 5, then into mixed oil until it stopped bubbling. They were tempered two rounds at 350ºF. I only polished them to 800 grit (ish), then a quick brush over with 1200 grit. After that I etched in a strongish dilute ferric chloride for about 15 seconds, then out and washed down with Windex. Then I simply rubbed the oxides off with Barkeeper's Friend. I usually repeat this five or six times. I love the iridescent grey that the Barkeeper's Friend and ferric give the blade. The other beauty of it is that the etch evens out any of the stray 800 (and 600...shhh!) grit scratches, and since these knives are made to be used in the kitchen...this is a good start on a protective patina. Any time you want to clean them up (for company etc), you just rub them down with some water and Barkeeper's Friend. Mineral oil and Barkeeper's Friend works well also.

 

I've tried the Barkeeper's Friend and vinegar/lemon juice...and the results were pretty cool. Different than this though. I probably wouldn't use that process on a knife that was going to be used.

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Seax blade , 29 cm length , edge section W1., Autohamon without clay, quenched in water.

 

This is my first better try of making a seax-style-blade.

sax.jpg

Edited by D.Kraft

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that is really beautiful. great stuff. Good ole W1.

kc

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like a cloudy sky on a windy day, with opposing twists.... :)

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