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John Smith

I want to see your Hamon

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this shear steel tanto will be awhile on the polishing stones yet, but here is a quick post yaki-ire look into the hamon using a torajirushi #120 synthetic japanese waterstone...looks promising, a nicely proportioned straight-laced suguha with a lovely turnback at the tip...

928051_899001593461459_58403456_n.jpg

info on my process: islandblacksmith.ca/process/yaki-ire-clay-tempering/
and a video in condensed form: vimeo.com/98307184



 


...keep up the rad! Edited by DaveJ

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IzLXDjl.jpg

Here's a hamon that I'm doing on 1080. Not fancy, but I like the simple look. Went a little lower then I would have liked, but not worth redoing as it still looks decent.

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Here is my last one...a general buscraft blade from an old file again...Simple suguha line but i tried to harden a portion of the spine

for the firesteel (to start a fire with)

 

 

 

20140801_194330.jpg20140801_194324.jpg

 

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Quenched in lukewarm water,no wrapping no cracks super rock hard...

I did a triple cycle of tempering 200 C for an hour each...Only the third time i saw this gold-ish colour..

 

20140812_220522.jpg

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next one's it, @don!

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Well this is not mine but it is a katana blade by the Kanemoto school sometime in the 1800s. The Kanemoto was said to be the ones whose hamon was copied and is the influence of all the wavy pattern. They call it the three cedars and my pictures do it no justice. I bought the blade which was in great condition but the koshirae was awful ww2 issue so I made a new Koshirae ( saya tsuba sepa habaki fuchi) which was a very big learning experience.

 

 

 

IMG_0435.JPG

IMG_0436.JPG

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Here are three pictures, from different angles, of the same blade. Admiral Steel 1095, Satanite clay, Parks 50 quench, heated by eye in the forge. Polish is EDM stones to 1200 grit followed by 1500 & 2000 grit, Silicon Carbide, paper. Etched for 15 minutes in Lemon Juice. Lemon Juice was applied to blade with paper towel and blade was kept wetted. Polished, by hand, with 10000 grit AO compound from Supergrit. Etched agin, with Lemon Juice, for another 15 minutes then polished as before.

 

Petty_Knife_01_Small_Image.jpg

 

Petty_Knife_02_Small_Image.jpg

 

Petty_Knife_04.jpg

 

~Bruce~

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1080 hunter quenched in canola.

Sanded to 2000 and polished with a mixture of car polish, 3m Trizact 3000g and 5000g, and powdered limestone that I pounded out on the anvil. Eventually want to get some silicon carbide abrasive.

 

Got a little unintentionally chaotic at the tip.

 

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Reverse side

NgfTc9Q.jpg

 

Quick question, Inside the hamon are lines that look like scratch marks from sanding. I sanded this sucker good so I was thinking it might be the grain?

hzcjO9n.jpg

 

j8koIFR.jpg

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Pretty sure that that is alloy banding. It's pretty common with 1080/1084 but seems to appear less so with W2 or 1095. I'm still trying to figure out exactly what causes it. Do you know what temperature and time you took the blade to before the quench? I have think that it happens either because of the pre-heat treating thermocycles ie. grain refinement or something simpler like getting it too hot before the quench. Did the clay pop off?

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definitely alloy banding. it shows up in my 1075 and 1095 work. hard to say if it's there from the supplier (in this case Aldo) or from something that I've done later. my understanding is that it's not particularly a favorable development in terms of steel integrity, but it doesn't bother me and in some ways actually looks pretty cool.

if you read up on the subject, you'll find a whole lot of information on what causes it. carbide migration, etc. etc.

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Pretty sure that that is alloy banding. It's pretty common with 1080/1084 but seems to appear less so with W2 or 1095. I'm still trying to figure out exactly what causes it. Do you know what temperature and time you took the blade to before the quench? I have think that it happens either because of the pre-heat treating thermocycles ie. grain refinement or something simpler like getting it too hot before the quench. Did the clay pop off?

Joe and Mr Branson, thanks for the reply about alloy banding. I could not tell you what temperature I took it to exactly, as I use a propane forge and my eye. I normalized twice then put it back in and as soon as it hits a little over critical I quench tip first. The clay (3m furnace cement) popped off the front during the quench, which i can only assume caused the unusual/wild look in the boshi. (hope I used that term correctly). As to Joe, I purchase this steel from Texasknife makers. I don't know where they get it from. Would like to start purchasing steel from New Jersey baron at some point.

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I was hiking in the Southern Sierra Mountains and found an old gold mine. It was a hard rock mine so I wasn't worried about a collapse, though I don't recommend anyone do what I did. A few feet inside I found two old pieces of iron that were deeply rusted and appeared to be as old as the mine. I took them home and threw them on a shelf. I later researched and found that the mine closed in the late 1800's. A few years later I decided my shop knife had seen better days (which was today). I figured I would just forge out a quick blade and not worry too much about appearance, just a new shop knife. So I grabbed the old piece and it sparked high carbon. I did a quick forge and hit it with a 2X72 to finish it up. This is how it came out of the oil, and after temper. The golden area came out bright silver before temper. The most crisp temper line I have ever seen out of quench. The second line up came from the interupted quench and a slow sink. Of course had I realized the true potential of this steel I would have taken the time to make a serious piece. I suppose one of these days I'll see what the second piece can do with some sincere effort.

Hamon.jpg

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It finished up with flames and rolling clouds that I don't have the
equipment to show well, but it can be seen a little with this pic. I
hope I can find more of this steel on another hike sometime.

20141127_152842.png

Edited by Tim Crocker

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First successful hamon! Rut lands furnace cement. image.jpg

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My hunting gear:

 

20150128_235354_1.jpg

 

Both are Aldo's W2 and hand forged to shape (as you can see with the hunting knife). The broadhead is a prototype...and if it lives through destructive testing, will be part of a matched set of probably six. Both are absolutely working gear...meant to be abused in the field.

 

Thanks for looking!

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Among the many successes, there has to be failures. Here's a cut down tanto I forged (my first time attempting a Japanese style blade) from an old file. Originally 16 inches overall and now 10 inches with an ugly crack. I quenched three times because I didn't like the look of the first two hamons, and on the third quench it cracked 3/4'ths way down the blade near the tang. The hamon itself is WAY too active for me and I find it rather ugly, yet it still has some cool aspects too it. There looks to be a swirling/almost hada like effect under the habuchi.

 

DSC_9644.jpg

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Wow! Lots of cool stuff here!

 

Here's a new one for me, I haven't made a full tang knife before and now I'm going to make four... It's obviously not done yet but I haven't posted in a long time so.

 

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Keep posting your hamon guys

 

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2015-tanto-3-yozakura-50.jpg

 

Suguha in century-old shear steel mounted in aikuchi koshirae from reclaimed and natural materials.

 

More info: islandblacksmith.ca/2015/05/yozakura-tanto/ and bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=31676

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