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John Smith

I want to see your Hamon

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Boy, Stuart sure puts a nice transparent polish on his blades. Hard to tell from a photo, but it looks quite similar to the quality of a traditional Japanese job!
Of course, the hamon is great on that, and to have it so consistently nice and well-placed over that great length is nothing to sneeze at.

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Stuart,

A beautiful hamon indeed, thanks for sharing it here.

 

Jan

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Aldo's W2 quenched in Parks 50, and then etched and polished.

 

4.jpg

 

 

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That's really nice, Wes!

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Thanks guys! :)

Absolutely!

 

Out of curiosity...did you harden this one in a forge or oven? Either way you've gotta love W2 lol.

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Absolutely!

 

Out of curiosity...did you harden this one in a forge or oven? Either way you've gotta love W2 lol.

 

In my forge (gas). I use a baffle so the heat is more even. And yes, I love W2. I know that you use it almost exclusively if I am not mistaken...

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That's a beauty Wes.

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That's a beauty Wes.

 

Thanks Joshua, I am glad you like it!

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Aldo's W2 quenched in Parks 50, and then etched and polished.

 

attachicon.gif4.jpg

 

 

 

There's a fluidity that's unusual in a Parks50 quench. Very fetching.

 

And to those who commented on my hamon... thanks very much for the comments

Edited by SBranson

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There's a fluidity that's unusual in a Parks50 quench. Very fetching.

 

And to those who commented on my hamon... thanks very much for the comments

 

 

I have only ever Parks quench W2. Does it not regularly produce fluidity?

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Maybe fluidity is the wrong word but I find Parks50 quenches tend to have cloudy artifacts whereas yours looks to have some of that playfulness of flames particularly the spot in the upper left corner of the photo.

I keep trying to chase that effect but haven't had as much luck with parks50 as with water. Anyway, nice work!

Edited by SBranson

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Maybe fluidity is the wrong word but I find Parks50 quenches tend to have cloudy artifacts whereas yours looks to have some of that playfulness of flames particularly the spot in the upper left corner of the photo.

I keep trying to chase that effect but haven't had as much luck with parks50 as with water. Anyway, nice work!

 

Got it. I wish that I could tell you what I did to get it, but it seriously wasn't planned. I can tell you that the Parks was room temp (~65 or 70 F or so) and that the knife was Austenized at about 1475F. I have a picture of the clay(wet) application if you are interested in that. Thanks Stuart! That means a lot coming from you.

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Sure, I'd like to see that and if you don't mind can you tell me the spine thickness of that blade? Thanks!

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Sure, I'd like to see that and if you don't mind can you tell me the spine thickness of that blade? Thanks!

Count me in on this information as well Wes! You know I'm always looking for more information on w2 and hamon ;).

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My pleasure gentlemen. Here you go.

The blade is 3/16th inch (4.76mm) at its thickest at the ricasso, and distally tapers all the way down to the tip. The clay was maybe a taste more than 1/16th inch thick. I typically don't apply it very thick It was applied a bit randomly, but I tried to make sure some of the ashi were disconnected from the spine clay. This was done on both sides. Clay is just watered down Rutlands fire cement; nothing special. Not sure if any of that is a help.

 

clay.jpg

Edited by Wes Detrick

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Interesting, Thanks! I have to ask how that little nib down at the spanish notch survived. I would think that would warp or worse. If it did survive fine that's very interesting and opens some doors for me creatively. Thanks again.

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Very helpful Wes. Thanks!

 

My pleasure Austin! It good to return some help to the forum instead of being a constant mooch.

 

 

Interesting, Thanks! I have to ask how that little nib down at the spanish notch survived. I would think that would warp or worse. If it did survive fine that's very interesting and opens some doors for me creatively. Thanks again.

 

Certainly Stuart, glad that it maybe helpful. Yep, the Spanish notch survived, although between you and me, I was paranoid that i was going to snap the thing off or it was going to warp badly. There was no warpage either and I didn't break it, thankfully.

Here is the thread for the finished knife, if you want to see the notch. There is a close up of it in there.

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Welcome to the forum Tucker! That's a good first bowie and hamon.

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Thanks Wes. this seems like a great community, lots of knowledge around thats for sure.

Absolutely! This community is easily the best general knife and sword smithing community i have been able to find in almost ten years. The respect, support, and knowledge here is unparalleled ;). Welcome aboard, and congratulations on the first hamon! Its addictive to say the least lol, in all of my time doing this I've never made a knife without one :D.

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Thanks Wes. this seems like a great community, lots of knowledge around thats for sure.

 

All the know-how, none of the attitude.

This forum rocks my world.

 

Nice knife Tucker. what's the wood?

Edited by Joshua States

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