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I want to see your Hamon


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All the know-how, none of the attitude.

This forum rocks my world.

 

Nice knife Tucker. what's the wood?

 

Thanks! the wood was sold to me as "Mexican Ironwood" but I think it may be cocoboa. I bought it when I was on vacation in mexico it only set me back about a buck fifty or so... wish I could buy that caliber wood here for so cheap.

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My latest, a W1 integral. I've been really enjoying the process of producing a hamon, and refining my technique aiming for better results each time.

Hi guys, lovely thread.   Heres one of my favourite hamons I made a few months back.    Steel is 125SC.   Jelle

Finished the W2 Camphor burl fighter.  I found that after 2000 grit sanding, liquid bar keepers friend brought out the hamon nicely after hand rubbing for 20 minutes then a quick buffing.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Before he passed away, ABS Master Smith John White posted his process for working, heat treating, and finishing W-2 for maximum hamon production. I thought that I would post this here to continue his legacy.

 

John White-Hamons.doc

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Here is a 7" Bowie knife made from a RR anchor (1060), the clay was satinite mixed with steel fileings and Fire brick powder. These are the best pictures I could get as it doesn't really stand out as much as I would like, any suggestions? I used white vinegar and lemon juice to etch.

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

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Here is a 7" Bowie knife made from a RR anchor (1060), the clay was satinite mixed with steel fileings and Fire brick powder. These are the best pictures I could get as it doesn't really stand out as much as I would like, any suggestions? I used white vinegar and lemon juice to etch.

you need more time with the lemon juice. clean blade thoroughly, apply juice uniformly with paintbrush avoiding any splotchiness, remove oxides with a mild abrasive, then repeat for 6 cycles. it often takes me an hour or more.

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  • 4 months later...

Wow! It took a while to read this thread... I couldn't stop until I hit the last comment... Very inspiring, thank you all!

 

This is my second attempt at differential heat treatment, the first one was several years ago and I will post pictures of that as soon as I go back home...

 

This is a 9" Santoku/Gyuto/Yanagiba hybrid. If someone has better knowledge on Japanese Kitchen Knives, please, feel free to correct me on what type of knife shape this would be.

 

So, the first picture is the blade being prepared with Ruthland refractory cement, I couldn't find the one in the tube for silicon gun, I only found a small bucket which, I found out later, being not thin-able, at least in water. It is very smooth but thick and, when I tried to mix it with water it kind of separated and became very slippery, not sticking to the blade. So, I wiped it off and applied as it is in the bucket. Probably, the first attempt with the thinned one, created a "slipperyness" on the blade which I probably did not wipe off entirely as it might have left a void. So, my guess is, when I quenched, the oil got into the void and hardened a section of the spine, as you can see by the hamon lines.

 

image.jpeg

 

This second picture is the blade being etched after oil quench and hand polishing up to 1200 grit.

 

image.jpeg

 

Now, I followed instructions given by the generous Brion Tomberlin and cleaned the blade with rubbing compound first, then 4F pumice. I didn't know I had Rotterstone in my boss' violin shop, otherwise I would have tried that.

 

image.jpeg

 

Now, I have yet a lot to learn but I don't consider this a 100% failure, the blade is incredibly flexible (9", forged from a Nicholson file so probably W2 or W1, I am told, and 1.9 mm thick and slightly tapered towards the tip), the hamon line is not the best, being interrupted, but I like it anyways... It reminds me of clouds rolling...

 

The next one will be better (I hope)...

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This is my first Hamon, several years ago, 5160 and Saratoga refractory cement. Hippo and warthog teeth 24757_1274902866386_3710106_n.jpg

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1/4 scale naginata, clay hardened "music wire" blade. i think the blade is about 4 inches long. the clay was pretty consistent along the blade but i did a very short quench in hot canola then removed the blade for a moment and then finished quenching, is that called an interrupted quench?

 

14731317_10209337656151032_4260840289957

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I'm having trouble getting pics of this Hamon, but I did get one side to show up well enough.

Hamon 1.JPG

Hamon 2.JPG

 

The other side is similar.

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Guys, try to use a white sheet of paper big enough to cover the blade from 4 or 5 feet high, let's say 16x20. When you are trying to take a picture hold the sheet over the blade until you see it's reflection all over the blade. That will give the blade a neutral look instead of all the glare and reflection that make hard to enhance details such hamons

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