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I want to see your Hamon


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I'm not opposed to stock removal. Sometimes it makes a lot more sense than forging anyway. I was wondering about a San-Mai application between two pieces of PW.

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My latest, a W1 integral. I've been really enjoying the process of producing a hamon, and refining my technique aiming for better results each time.

Hi guys, lovely thread.   Heres one of my favourite hamons I made a few months back.    Steel is 125SC.   Jelle

Finished the W2 Camphor burl fighter.  I found that after 2000 grit sanding, liquid bar keepers friend brought out the hamon nicely after hand rubbing for 20 minutes then a quick buffing.

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1 hour ago, Joshua States said:

I'm not opposed to stock removal. Sometimes it makes a lot more sense than forging anyway. I was wondering about a San-Mai application between two pieces of PW.

It would be ideal. I have a straight razor underway that's wrought/26c3 San Mai. There is a much higher risk of failure with wrought/mild steel than another carbon steel. 

 

I'd like to try 26c3 sandwiched between 15n20 someday.

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Hello, this is an experimental blade made of medium carbon steel (I can’t say the exact grade of steel, we are conducting chemical analyzes)
In my experience, such large grains (nie, nioi) can only be obtained on medium carbon steel, on steels with a carbon content of 0.7-1.2 this is not even close (dozens of experiments were carried out)

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Posted (edited)

This is my first attempt at a hamon

I am making a knife for my uncle with a rattlesnake head and tail. I wanted the hamon to look like the snakes tongue coming out it's mouth.

Steel is 26C3, known for a good hamon.

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On 3/12/2020 at 4:40 PM, Daniil said:

In my experience, such large grains (nie, nioi) can only be obtained on medium carbon steel,

Hi Daniil.  I've noticed this too, when I was playing around with different 'colors' of steel in my damascus billets with what we call mild steel (or A36, if I remember correctly) here in the US.   I always assumed the large grains were from all the impurities that A36 has.  It's my understanding that A36 is made from scrap metal melted down and minimal, if no attention is paid to what goes into it.  10-15 years ago, a friend was forging out a piece of 2" round bar under a power hammer, and in the middle of drawing out the billet, a relatively new looking ball bearing popped out of the middle, almost as if the bar gave suddenly gave birth.  

I'd love to hear more or better information if out there.

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Not great photos, but straight out of the etch and scrubbed the oxides off with loose abrasives.

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This is my First real successful Hamon; done on a 1065 kitchen knife.

I left the blade dark as a personal preference, but I think I was able to polish the hamon to at least a little bit of wispy-ness:D
I thought it was neat that some Hada showed up though!:o

 

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On 5/3/2020 at 12:09 AM, billyO said:

Hi Daniil.  I've noticed this too, when I was playing around with different 'colors' of steel in my damascus billets with what we call mild steel (or A36, if I remember correctly) here in the US.   I always assumed the large grains were from all the impurities that A36 has.  It's my understanding that A36 is made from scrap metal melted down and minimal, if no attention is paid to what goes into it.  10-15 years ago, a friend was forging out a piece of 2" round bar under a power hammer, and in the middle of drawing out the billet, a relatively new looking ball bearing popped out of the middle, almost as if the bar gave suddenly gave birth.  

I'd love to hear more or better information if out there.

Hi, I just recently did a chemical analysis of steel (from which the wakijashi blade is forged).

Further, it is already necessary to experiment, quenching is necessary for liquid oil, because these grains (nie, nioi) appear only at a low cooling rate, if the cooling rate is high, then the ham will be the same as on steels with a carbon content of 0, 8% and more .......
Therefore, we take steel with a carbon content of 0.5 - 0.6% (if we want to get "grains") ........

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Finished the W2 Camphor burl fighter.  I found that after 2000 grit sanding, liquid bar keepers friend brought out the hamon nicely after hand rubbing for 20 minutes then a quick buffing.

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That's hell of activity and hamon on the blade, remarkable work!

On 10/19/2020 at 2:14 PM, Joshua States said:

 

 

On 10/19/2020 at 2:14 PM, Joshua States said:

My latest. This is from a piece of that Hunk O'steel I bought from Ray Rybar back in 2016. Crazy activity in this one.

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