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John Smith

I want to see your Hamon

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There are certainly some beautiful hamons in this thread. This is my first attempt at a hamon. I'm using 1080 with furnace cement as my clay. I guess it's ok for a first attempt, but there is very little activity. Advice?First clay hardening.JPG

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I like that last one a lot. please let us know how you polished it!

kc

 

I've made a thread on "Fit and Finish" now, Here's the link.

Hope it helps!

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DSC01598.jpg

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I have been following this thread for along time also, and really am taken aback by the fantastic amount of talent and interest in this portion of bladesmithing that is in evidence here. With that in mind, here is my meager contribution just to keep the ball rolling.

 

It is a 10" bowie forged from 2 1/2 diameter W2 sourced from Don Hansen last year. Several normalizing cycles and a Satinite clay coat. Did not turn out at all how I thought it would, but I still liked it! I could definately work on my polishing technique, but always am to impatient to bring them out real well.

 

Clint

Copy (1) of IMG_7982.jpg

Edited by clint c

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P3150390-1.jpg

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P3150397.jpg

 

Hunter79.jpg

Hamonhunter1-1.jpg

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This thread is very inspirational. This is my second knife with hamon (and I plan on more - it is addictive!):

 

DSCN1628.jpg

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Wow these blades look fantastic, I am impressed with all of your blade guys.

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Hi everyone, this is a great thread, some amazing hamons. NICE WORK! Here are a couple of mine from this year.

 

Here's a forged integral chef out of some W2 I got from Don Hanson. Clayed with Satanite and quenched in 120 deg. oil.

I sanded it out to 800 and etched/polished with Flitz and pumice, since it's a user. There are some things in the hamon that would have come out more interestingly had I polished higher, next time time though.

 

IMG_6262.JPG

IMG_6271.JPG

 

The one below is a similar fighter, forged integral from W1 steel, clayed with Satanite and quenched 3 sec. in warm water, then finished in 120 deg. oil. I sanded this one to 2500, then etched/cleaned/polished a bunch, finishing the yakiba with pumice to whiten.

 

IMG_5946.JPG

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IMG_5962.JPG

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DSCF5386.jpg 19.75 overall length wakizashi' "Clouds Over Koke'e" born on a lucky day in may.

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The one below is a similar fighter, forged integral from W1 steel, clayed with Satanite and quenched 3 sec. in warm water, then finished in 120 deg. oil. I sanded this one to 2500, then etched/cleaned/polished a bunch, finishing the yakiba with pumice to whiten.

 

Salem,

 

Can you expound a bit on the pumice? What do you use, and how do you use it? Thanks!

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The one below is a similar fighter, forged integral from W1 steel, clayed with Satanite and quenched 3 sec. in warm water, then finished in 120 deg. oil. I sanded this one to 2500, then etched/cleaned/polished a bunch, finishing the yakiba with pumice to whiten.

 

Salem,

 

Can you expound a bit on the pumice? What do you use, and how do you use it? Thanks!

 

Matthew, my understanding of it, basic though it is. In traditional polishing, the "hadori" stone is often used at the end, if the desired result is a "frosty" looking hamon and yakiba. The hadori is actually a coarser stone than the final polishing stones, and abrades the steel in such a way that with light reflecting from the surface it has a white appearance. I think pumice is a sort of western approximation.

 

I heard about the use of pumice from Kevin the Professor, who mentioned it as well as the fact that rottenstone, a finer but similar product, may be better yet.

 

I tried it on the fighter and it worked well IMO, the finish before pumice was 2500 grit hand-rubbed. I used cotton make-up pads, dampened, and dipped in pumice powder. I scrubbed the yakiba and hamon with the pad over my thumb. It took a while to see results.

 

I tried it again on the W2 chef knife pictured, but the chef had an 800 grit "user finish" hamon, and didn't respond as well. There was some effect, but I think the surface needs to be at a very high polish already to frost up well with the pumice.

 

Hope that was at all clear. I'm experimenting further. Also, there are probably a bunch of guys around here who will know more about it.

 

Oh, I just remembered- I did a full W.I.P. post of that fighter build over on Bladeforums, with several polishing pics. Here's a link:

http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=814385

Edited by Salem Straub

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Hey Guys,

 

I am posting pics here, too. This is a mix of low manganese 1070 and w2. Subtle pattern, 500 layers. The knife is really not high on "fit and finish" because I threw it together. The purpose was to test more ideas of polishing and this steel to see what it looked like.

 

Salem and Matt - I polished this on by hand to 2500 grit and then etched carfully in vinegar several times. I took the oxides off above the habuchi with Flits or with 2500 grit paper. At the end, I darkened the top area a bit with Flitz.

 

The habuchi and below, I knocked the oxides off with FFF pumice. I like pumice better than rotten stone because it is harder and gives a better counterpolish. I have tried both, and I use both. Rotten stone is also good to remove swirls from the top half of a blade with some oil to make a slurry.

 

Pumice, with an oil or water slurry, rubbed with finger along the habuchi and hamon (especially the habuchi, it helps to emphasize the grain boundaries and make the thing seem iridescent). As Salem correctly said, using pumice is a counter-polish that makes everything appear frosty, plus it selectively abrades the grain boundaries and makes ashi and such more visible.

 

Hope you guys like!

 

Kevin

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Guys those hamons are fantastic Keep em coming.

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Salem and Kevin,

 

Thanks for the tips, guys. I've been using lemon juice to etch, and simichrome to clean off the oxides between etching cycles. At the end I use 800 grit loose abrasive with 3 in 1 oil to make a slurry and sort of scrub the blade with it. Most of that was learned through Walter Sorrells' videos. I'm going to have to try out the pumice, though. Everything you guys have been saying has made a lot of sense! Thanks for taking the time to post.

 

~Matt

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Here is a good pic of the hamon from the dao. I am giving up on rottenstone. It doesn't do anything for me, not really. I am sticking with flitz or mothers to darken back and ff or fff pumice to highlight the yakiba and counter polish the hamon. I can't personally seem to move forward right now. I am stuck at this level, and need something (time, practice, skill, devine insight, knowledge, something) to get to the next one.

 

This one is very active and nice, it is less beautiful than the one from the pattern welded knife, but I think that may always be true. The visible grain of traditional steels or high layer pattern welding may help enhance how light plays with the hamon as a rule. Still, it is the best I can do right now with monosteel.

 

W2 quenched in 120F water for 3, then Parks 50 (room temp).

clayed with satanite, using a very thin coating.

 

thanks for looking, and for sharing information. This reservoir of knowledge surely helps!

 

kc

 

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IMG_0093.JPG

Edited by Kevin (The Professor)

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:o OUCH! :(

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Colin, I feel your pain; my katana in progress just turned into a potential wakizashi...clean break behind the machi. Yours is definitiely a keeper for the spectacular self annihilation it demonstrates.

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Wow - that's the most impressive cracking I have seen. Definitely forum worthy.

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This is my first and only hamon so far. It is out of Don's W2 and done with Satanite

2011-08-03_23-27-28_83.jpg

 

I still have a full polishing cycle to do yet, but think it turned out ok for my first one

 

Thanks

Mike

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