Jump to content

Home made anvil HT advice needed


Bob Geldart
 Share

Recommended Posts

I've purchased some EN8 steel (1045) which I intend to use as an anvil. The size is roughly 6" x 7" x 9". I want to harden every face of the block, not just a single face!! I have 3 x T-Rex burners which I will use in a special furnace that I will make. Any advice on acheiving a good HT for the steel will be gratefully received.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would be nice if you could set up near a clear running stream to eliminate the vapor jacket during quench.Ived dropped similar sized pieces in a 55 gallon drum of super quench.I was using mild steel.I had an industrial sized paint mixer whirling in the drum to give agitation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A friend of mine did a large piece that was almost 100 lbs. I don't remember the steel but we made a big fire and put it in he used an electric leaf blower and we just added wood till a magnet would not attract and they threw it in a pond (fire was close to the pond) it made a nice anvil.

 

Mike

Mike Turner

 

 

http://www.turnerknives.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Glen- I heated a cast steel Harbor Freight anvil and dumped a bushel of cold water on it. It hardened some and was a lot better but it has soft spots and isn't "really" hard. I've since learned that anything that big has so much thermal mass that it's best to use a running stream (or a garden hose) to quench the surface and keep it cool until all that internal heat gets drawn off.

To get all sides hard could be a real challenge but with a setup like Glen mentioned you just might pull it off.

The ideal would be to hit all faces simultaneously with jets of cold water until the anvil was completely cold.

I would like to hear how it turns out.

Glen, how well did the mild steel harden up in the super quench?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Glen- I heated a cast steel Harbor Freight anvil and dumped a bushel of cold water on it. It hardened some and was a lot better but it has soft spots and isn't "really" hard. I've since learned that anything that big has so much thermal mass that it's best to use a running stream (or a garden hose) to quench the surface and keep it cool until all that internal heat gets drawn off.

To get all sides hard could be a real challenge but with a setup like Glen mentioned you just might pull it off.

The ideal would be to hit all faces simultaneously with jets of cold water until the anvil was completely cold.

I would like to hear how it turns out.

Glen, how well did the mild steel harden up in the super quench?

 

It didn't get glass hard and it will ding if miss hit but I noticed much more rebound.After using it for several weeks I noticed the face was actually work hardening . I ve heard of folks peening the face of cast anvils to work harden the face.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It didn't get glass hard and it will ding if miss hit but I noticed much more rebound.After using it for several weeks I noticed the face was actually work hardening . I ve heard of folks peening the face of cast anvils to work harden the face.

 

Joe Szilaski, when a child in Poland, used to work harden anvils in a blacksmith shop by hitting them many times with a hammer. :blink::wacko:

.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I don't know enough about it, but it seems like an all around hardened anvil would not be a good thing. Isn't it partly the sadwich effect that provides the resiliance and also eliminates the posibility of fracturing it.

 

As far as heat treating is concerned in Chuck's video he quenched it in super quench and then hosed it for about half an hour with a garden hose on pretty full. He used a hoist to handle the block, you need something that drops it fast but controls it, and you probably want to be off to the side when the thing pops. It is possible to make a hand grenade this way so really sweat the details on your sample and it's proper HT process.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nimba makes fully hardened tool steel anvils.

I've kinda looked at their website some and really like them.

I like the mass they have to them. Mainly just a solid rectangular block of steel with a horn and rear.

 

I know J. Arthur Loose has one of them.

They look like real nice anvils though.

Seems like one nice thing would be if the face ever got a little pitted, with care you could grind it back flat and not worry about grinding through the hardened face, as the whole thing is hard.

Beau Erwin

www.ErwinKnives.com

Custom knives

Bcarta Composites

Stabilized Woods

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I spoke with the people I bought the steel off and they will do a full deep HT for about £1 per kilo (60c per LB). This means that I can use more exotic steels such as S1, H13, EN24 etc. It's almost cheaper than doing it myself!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Like the HT discussion. Been thinking about this for a big chunk of 4140 myself. But the shaper really caught my eye. Can't make out the nameplate. Is it a South Bend?

 

Steve

 

It's an Alba 1a which was later renamed as an Elliott 10M when Elliott bought out Alba.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...