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feather damascus?


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I'm trying to figure out how the pattern development goes for producing feather damascusand i'm pretty sure its a modified W, buts thats about all i do kind of know. im not sure how to get it out on the flats of the blade without cutting into the billet, and would love for someone that knows to explain the process, and a good layer count guideline if possible as well. I have seen one of Sifu Don's feather pattern pics so i know he knows, thats makes at least one person.

thanks for the help and info

 

-patrick

 

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Dickie Robinson was working on a billet of this pattern at the Spring ABS Hammer-in this year. He also had a knife displayed with this pattern that caught my eye. I wasn't paying attention when he was working on the billet. Had I know what he was doing I would have been! The part I saw was the billet being split down the middle on the hydraulic press. The cut was longitudinal (from one end to the other, through the long axis) and nearly the whole way through, maybe 1/4" to 1/2" left on the bottom. It was then fluxed and welded back together. The billet was probably about 3" square by 5" long. I do not know what layer count was used and what manipulation the billet was subjected to prior to the process I described. Hopefully this helps explain a little.

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I'm trying to figure out how the pattern development goes for producing feather damascusand

 

So far as I know:

This pattern was first explored in the U.S. by Larry Sandlin of AL (see knives 98 cover). It is my understanding that Larry worked it out from some 19th century sketches of a European explorer traveling in Indonesia. This pattern was first developed by the Empu (knifemakers) ... i.e. Keris knife makers.

Larry taught it to Don Fogg and Don did that "Life and Death" dagger http://www.dfoggknives.com/life_and_death_dagger.htm in the late 90's.

Don walked me through the pattern over the phone shortly after the life/death dagger was published in a blade mag.

http://www.myarmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.ph...;highlight=seax

From there I showed it to Steve Schwarzer and he made some folders and then it spread through the community.

Don, Steve and I demoed this pattern at Batson's symposium in 2000 maybe?

 

Not sure where it has gone now, but few seem to remember Larry.

 

Ric

Edited by Richard Furrer
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Dayum Ric! That was a nice knife! You should post more here too, so have you worked on the sword with that pattern you mentioned?

 

I've decided to work mono-steels for the time being but patterns like that could keep me up at night! Thanks for the history lesson.

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  • 11 years later...
On 12/12/2006 at 9:16 AM, Richard Furrer said:

 

So far as I know:

This pattern was first explored in the U.S. by Larry Sandlin of AL (see knives 98 cover). It is my understanding that Larry worked it out from some 19th century sketches of a European explorer traveling in Indonesia. This pattern was first developed by the Empu (knifemakers) ... i.e. Keris knife makers.

Larry taught it to Don Fogg and Don did that "Life and Death" dagger http://www.dfoggknives.com/life_and_death_dagger.htm in the late 90's.

Don walked me through the pattern over the phone shortly after the life/death dagger was published in a blade mag.

http://www.myarmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.ph...;highlight=seax

From there I showed it to Steve Schwarzer and he made some folders and then it spread through the community.

Don, Steve and I demoed this pattern at Batson's symposium in 2000 maybe?

 

Not sure where it has gone now, but few seem to remember Larry.

 

Ric

I knew Larry Sandlin personally growing up. He was a good friend of my fathers. He made some of the most beautiful hand carved violins I've ever seen and I remember him forging these beautiful blades and taking them to knife shows in Atlanta, GA. If anyone has any pics of some of his work please share them. I made this post for some closure on people wondering what ever happened to Larry. He lost his battle with lung cancer in 2005. He was one of the most talented men I've ever known.  

Screenshot_2018-04-06-22-30-13.png

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So sad to hear this, Larry was an exceptional bladesmith and artist, and a good man.  I had the pleasure of an hour long conversation with him in 2001, along with seeing a few examples of his work... I had wondered what had become of him.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Gee Wiz....I met him at Batson's Symposium via Don Fogg. Had to be only a few years before his death. His work is wonderful.

Thank you for posting that Adam. As a craft industry we need to know the giants upon who's shoulders we stand.

Ric

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2 hours ago, Richard Furrer said:

Gee Wiz....I met him at Batson's Symposium via Don Fogg. Had to be only a few years before his death. His work is wonderful.

Thank you for posting that Adam. As a craft industry we need to know the giants upon who's shoulders we stand.

Ric

Creating it would probably become a ball of controversy, but I think it would be neat to be able to read the modern history of baldesmithing.

I've only been at this a few years, but people have given so freely of their knowledge, that I certainly don't even know who to nod to when I try a new pattern, or technique.  People will ask me how I came up with an idea, and I just have to say I saw it on a forum, or someone's website.  I never know the genesis of a concept.

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I suspect between Ric, Howard Clark, Jim Batson, and Don Fogg, there are enough knowledgeable people about the modern history to make it work.  I know just enough to get in trouble.

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On 4/17/2018 at 12:55 PM, Alan Longmire said:

I suspect between Ric, Howard Clark, Jim Batson, and Don Fogg, there are enough knowledgeable people about the modern history to make it work.  I know just enough to get in trouble.

like that wouldn't cause trouble :) seriously though this is a really good idea, Like Ric said we are all standing on the shoulders of giants, it is sad that smiths like Don fogg , Darrel Meier, that are no longer active and are fading from memory. There are so many makers that shaped all we do today, that no one seems to remember, some retired, some gone, I find it sad that so few are remembered. 

MP

 

 

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3 hours ago, Matthew Parkinson said:

like that wouldn't cause trouble :) seriously though this is a really good idea, Like Ric said we are all standing on the shoulders of giants, it is sad that smiths like Don fogg , Darrel Meier, that are no longer active and are fading from memory. There are so many makers that shaped all we do today, that no one seems to remember, some retired, some gone, I find it sad that so few are remembered. 

MP

 

 

I know precisely diddly squat about who pioneered, discovered, or re-discovered what,  but would help out in this endeavor if there is grunt work to be done.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I tried to do an article series years ago for Blade...they rejected the idea.

With the way things are headed today it would have to be video. Maybe a series of interviews and some forging.

Ric

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