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multiple forges/burners


DFogg

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I am in the process of building a couple forges and putting together a low temp salt rig. I would really like to run them all off of one regulator, but this seems to easy and convenient. Is it possible? Advisable? What is my best bet for a standard fitting? Will making all my connections to the various burners 1/4" male allow me to simply unscrew the hose and switch it among appliances? Or will I have problems with leakage, time, etc.?

 

Thanks,

 

John

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I have a red head high pressure regulator at the tank and run a hard line to the forge station. Some forges run off a low pressure regulator so it is installed in the line and those appliances run off it.

 

I don't recommend breaking down the lines. It is very time consuming and a nuisance. Getting all the fittings to match is a great idea. I have a bucket of fittings and everything I work on the system I find myself staring at the parts like a jigsaw puzzle.

Don Fogg

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Don,

 

Thanks. I am also running a high pressure, red head regulator with a 0-30lb. guage. I have matching fittings for the inputs to the various burners. But I am wondering what the options are if I choose "permanent" connections.

 

Will this simply mean I will have a separate tank and regulator for each forge/oven?

 

Thanks again,

 

John

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I use a shop built manifold to run 2 forges, one of which is a 2 burner unit.  I"I've got a high pressure regulator on one line to the manifold.  The manifold is black iron pipe and 1/4 turn stainless valves.  All the fittings are 1/4 inch pipe thread.  I can run the single burner Fogg style forge at less than a pound of line pressure, I use a needle valve to regulate the flow at the burner input, it's probably running at just a few ounces of pressure.  The larger, 2 burner unit forges and heat treats running on 2-3 pounds of pressure, and welds with 5 pounds or so.  I have run both at the same time, but the heat drives me out, and I don't need both running most of the time, anyway.

 

They both run off a single 20 gallon (stands about chest high to me) tank.  I never get freeze up with my current setup, like I used to do running off a 5 gallon tank.

 

Geoff

"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

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Thanks Geoff,

 

I may opt for a manifold, but part of my concern is space. I would like to have certain things tucked away when not in use. I would also like to store them indoors, but move them outdoors for use. So disconnecting and reconnecting would be ideal. Any issues you can think of, save for inconvenience of screwing things on and off.

 

Also, everyone, I tested a burner today. The good news is all of my connections were solid. The bad news is, it leaked where the hose connected to the regulator. Now these are two brass fittings, unaltered from the propane store. What would cause them to leak?

 

Thanks,

 

John

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Did you use pipe compound or teflon on those fittings?

 

Most gas fittings are compression fittings with a male and female side that compress against one another to make a tight pressure fit. The regulator takes simple pipe thread so you have to use either pipe compound or teflon rated for propane to make a leak free connection.

 

When installing or connecting gas fittings always check each connection. You can buy leak test or use children's soap bubble soap to check for leaks.

 

You might enjoy a look at my connection tree. I have five forges running off this line.

Don Fogg

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I have seen, in welding shops and in catalogs, quick connect fittings for gas.  I use quick connects for my compressor, but I've never tried them for propane, but all of my current stuff is more or less fixed in place, subject to the next reorg.

 

Geoff

"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

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Yeah, I was thinking about quick connects as I was reading through this.  There are QC fittings for air and hydraulic applications, seems like we could figure out something for gas hookups.  One thing that comes to mind, thinking about using the air type:  There are two sizes, 1/4 and 3/8, and two "standard" styles in each size.  (Generally only see one of the standards in stores, but I used to see both.  I learned this lesson by buying a mixed-up set, several years ago.)  If I try this with gas, I'd want to settle on a size and style for my gas connections that did not match any of my compressed air connections... ;)

 

Another idea, though it still involves threads, is using a union fitting.  At least they're designed to be taken apart, and you don't have to twist the pipe to do it...  Know they come in black and galvanized.  What's called a union in the flare fitting family isn't, at least not to my mind.

 

Steve

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Wow! What a tree! Unfortunately, I will be storing my stuff in a garage but doing a lot of work outside, so such a permanent setup is not an option, yet.

 

Thanks for all the good advice so far.

 

Don, I used teflon tape and pipe "dope" on all iron to iron and iron to brass fittings. But I was under the impression that these were not used for brass to brass. Indeed, the leaky connection was brass to brass (regulator to hose). Should I be using teflon tape at this connection?

 

Thanks,

 

John

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I use pipe dope or teflon on all non-compression fittings. You need something for insurance. I found these crayons that you just swipe the threads and then put it together and I have never had a problem with a fitting where I have use it.

 

I was wondering about quick release, but have never tried them.

 

All of my grinders are mounted on industrial carts so I can wheel them into my inside shop at night and lock them up. They have surge protected outlet strips mounted on the cart and set up and plug in in seconds.

 

A propane cart might be just the ticket here where you have your forges all set up with the connections going to a single flexible line that you can connect to the tank when you are ready to work.

Don Fogg

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These people have quick-connects rated for gas, no less.

I have found this company to be very helpful and the owner is more than happy to talk to you about your needs. This  helps insure your safety and his peace of mind that he isn't helping anyone blow themselves up!

 

http://www.wardburner.com/burner.cfm

 

Dennis

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Don,

 

Thanks. Here's something off the web:

 

"When connecting the supply hose to the solenoid, an adapter is usually required. Wrap the threads of the solenoid end of the adapter with Teflon sealing tape. Do not use Teflon tape on the hose end. The rule is that when the threads form the seal, you need Teflon tape, but not when the seal is formed with a flare, O-ring, or other compression fitting."

 

The local propane man told me the same. But I am with you now. Please tell us more about the crayons

 

John

 

[dunno]

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