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Stake anvil


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I made myself a quick stake anvil. I have wanted one for a while and when I scrounged a 2" axle I had to make it.

 

It was a lot more work than you would think, but it works great. If you are starting out, this will get the job done.

Don Fogg

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I've got 3 log splitters in my back garden (left there from my sister's BF sculpture course, he liked to make things out of reclaimed steel.) At least I think they are for splitting logs. Spiked wedges about 20" long with a 5" x 3" head. That's my current anvil.

"When our eyes see our hands doing the work of our hearts, the circle of Creation is completed inside us, the doors of our souls fly open and love steps forth to heal everything in sight."  Michael Bridge

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Don - what is that for?  Any particular intended use?

 

Thanks,

 

JD

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Those wedges would do the job, wouldn't they? 'course, you don't want to smite them too hard, lest they perform their intended function on your anvil stand. Whooops! :banghead:

"I'm not anti-gun. I'm pro-knife." Molly Ivins

NT Limpin' Cat Prokopp

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Don, did you taper that (axle) by hand? :P

Nice either way, just curious.

 

Chris (Prizzim) showed me a neat stake anvil design at Harley's hammerin. He notched near the pointy end of a splitting wedge and drew out the end from the notch (similar to a stick tang) so the stake has shoulders to keep it from splitting the log or going in too deep to get out.

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I drew it out with the press and 50Lb power hammer, but still it was a pain.

 

The hole was predrilled using different size spade bits and the bottom of the stake is fairly blunt. I am keeping an eye on the stump to see if it starts to split. I was thinking of welding on a skirt plate, but not if I don't have to.

 

It doesn't have the same rebound you get from a good anvil and because it is relatively dead, it takes more energy. What I wanted it for was primarily edge forging and setting the ricasso transition.

Don Fogg

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Hi,

 

Would it be a good idea to build one for a regular anvil's hardy hole?

 

Also, what kind of a heat treatment is done on that?  I know that you can buy 2" diameter W1 rods in some places...

 

JD

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The stake is replacing a hardy tool that I was using. Working off the hardy you are over an unsupported section of the anvil in most cases and that creates its own pecularities, also unless I wedged it in the hardy tool had too much slop and moved around. This seems like a better solution and after seeing them used in third world shops it got on my wish list.

 

I just heated about an inch of the end to above critical and quenched it in the rain barrel. The hardness came out just about right. I am not marring it when I forge and it isn't so hard that I am worried about chipping.

 

I will probably reshape the face as I work with it more until it has the surfaces that I want. I did go back to my main anvil to do the heavy forging and straightening, but this was nice for forging the edge right down.

 

Jimmy Fikes went to India and spent some time with the swordsmiths there. They did all their work on a large stake anvil. He was impressed with it as a tool.

Don Fogg

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Thanks, Don, that's what I was looking for.
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I was just poking through "The Museum Of Early American Tools" by Eric Sloane.  He has some really clear line drawings of stake anvils.  Most of them have shoulders that go all the way around the base of the stake at the depth the smith wants the stake to stop going into the wood at.  That is an inspirational tool, Don.  I have a couple of old small axles that I could forge down into some stakest that would probably work real well for small fiddly bits that are tough to get to on a regular anvil.  Hmmm.  More things to play with. :cool:

Show me a blacksmith making a toilet, and I will show you a man forging ahead.

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Don you might solve the splitting problem the way I did with a stump that I had an anvil mounted on. I had an old barrell hoop laying around. I fitted it tightly around the top of the stump and ended the splitting problem.
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Another good source for a stake anvil if you are a farmer or have access to a farmer's junk pile is the butt end of a disk harrow axle. They have a flared head about 2.5 inches sq.

The steel is 4140 or 1050. When i was growing up on the farm

we use to break these on a regular basis.

Also stump splitting can be helped by using an elm stump. You

can't  split elm with Dynamite.

 

Yellow Hammer

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Also stump splitting can be helped by using an elm stump. You

can't  split elm with Dynamite.

yeah, but you can shred em with a splitter.  the farmer behind me gave us some elm logs one year and even let us use his tracter mounted splitter cause he knew we couldent bust it by hand.  What a mess that was and its make for an ugly wood pile.  "free stuff..."

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