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Simplified Hatchet


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This is a very simple hatchet made from one piece of tool steel. You can use this method for a small hatchet, or a large felling ax. For this one, I am using 1/4" x 1-1/4" steel.

 

1. Bend each end over and onto itself about 5/8". This will later make the poll.

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2. Bend the entire piece in the middle so that the ends that you bent over are on the inside. The center of the bar is what will eventually make the blade. Apply flux to the entire piece after bending it.

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3. Now forge weld the the poll and the face. Leave an un-welded section between the poll and face for the eye.

aaaaa013.jpg

 

4. Begin forging the blade to the shape you enjoy. Use a cross peen to make the face wider. To refine the profile you can set the head upside down on the face and hammer down, or set it right side up on the horn and hammer down.

aaaaa015.jpg

 

5. Now drift the eye. Do this at a high heat to keep from breaking the welds or sucking the eye down. Use a tapered drift (about 1/8" or 3/16" of taper per inch of length), and drift from both sides. This gives an hourglass shape to the inside of the eye that keeps the handle held in more tightly.

aaaaa016.jpg

 

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After forging, clean up the profile some if you like, establish the edge, then heat treat it. Most hatchets and axes should be convex ground.

 

These are fun to make, and don't take long to do. Have fun....

 

Thanks guys,

 

Ty

Edited by Murch

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You make it look so easy in those few pictures, I only wish it were for me! LOL! I'll certainly have to give it a try now, though, awsome tutorial.

 

Thanks

 

Rob Waite

 

 

Hey I meant to ask, did you make your own drift for the eye, or can you get them somewhere?

 

Rob

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That was a great tutorial, and perfect timing. I have an axe to forge by request and have been trying to decide how I would go about it. You just showed me the method I will use. Maybe the forging gods are watching over us all.

 

 

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I'm with Donnie. A buddy of mine wants a bearded axe and this looks a lot easier than modifying Bob Oulette's adze tutorial. I couldn't find anything on Google about making axes... this is a God send- thank you :)

Kristopher Skelton, M.A.

"There was never a good knife made from bad steel"

A quiet person will perish ~ Basotho Proverb

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Thanks guys :)

Glad it was such good timing for you Donnie and Kristopher.

 

Rob, I made this rectangular drift from 1-3/8" round bar. Mild steel will work fine. www.blacksmithsdepot.com sells tear drop shaped drifts. Look under "misc. forging tools".

 

Thanks,

Ty

Edited by Murch

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I just finished forging one and it's not as easy as it looks. None of my tongs would grip it right after the folding. The face welded up good but the back delamed. On the first two folds I went 1.5" and I still did not get the draw out that I wanted.

 

My shoulder and propane tank both ran out at the same time. Should finish it by tomarrow.

 

Great tutorial!

Everything I need to know I learned from the people trapped in my basement.

 

 

I'm out of my mind but feel free to leave a message.

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Nice work TY, very simple and easy to understand. I need to get some flux.

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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Brent, the poll section IS more difficult to weld. I'm lookin' forward to a picture.

 

Thanks guys.

 

Don't hold your breath waiting! :blink:

Edited by B Finnigan

Everything I need to know I learned from the people trapped in my basement.

 

 

I'm out of my mind but feel free to leave a message.

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Thanks Ty, I'm with the rest of the posts. A great tutorial and we appreciate you taking the time to document each step. No other group of artists will share thier knowledge as graciously as a blacksmith.

 

Rev

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I have been practicing dry forge welding and this hatchet is my first actual project that I used it on. The idea of not using that miserable flux is very appealing and I may get away with not re-lining the forge as much now.

 

You also do not have micro flux meteorites flying around the shop either.

Everything I need to know I learned from the people trapped in my basement.

 

 

I'm out of my mind but feel free to leave a message.

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Thanks for going through the time to document and share this one. I can't wait to try it.

Thanks

Chuck

"I find that the harder I work, the more luck I seem to have."

- Thomas Jefferson

 

"The difference between fiction and reality? Fiction has to make sense."

- Tom Clancy

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Murch:

I saw your anvil the other day and wanted to comment about it. I don't know if it is an old tale or the truth but here goes. Seeing that you are in Georgia (like me), when Sherman came through part of his orders were to destroy the infrastructure. In part, anvils were routinely heated in large fires then water quenched. Then the horns and/or heals were broken off so that the could'nt be used. If that is true, you have a little piece of history.

Makes for a cool story anyway...

See ya,

Chuck

"I find that the harder I work, the more luck I seem to have."

- Thomas Jefferson

 

"The difference between fiction and reality? Fiction has to make sense."

- Tom Clancy

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Chuck,

I read somewhere that that story was not completely up to snuff or something. Jock Dempsey knows the history of that story because I believe it was someone he knows that got that ball rolling. Try asking the guru (the guru specifically) on the guru's den on anvilfire if you wanna know more. Wish I could find where I was reading about that..... :wacko:

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Cool. Like I said I didn't know if it was true. I have helped break the heel off an emerson anvil though. We were making flatters in the hardy hole. Square up the stock then about 5 of us strike with sledges. After the 3rd one was forged and the 4th was started the heel broke off. I guess some anvils will break.

"I find that the harder I work, the more luck I seem to have."

- Thomas Jefferson

 

"The difference between fiction and reality? Fiction has to make sense."

- Tom Clancy

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have been practicing dry forge welding and this hatchet is my first actual project that I used it on. The idea of not using that miserable flux is very appealing and I may get away with not re-lining the forge as much now.

 

You also do not have micro flux meteorites flying around the shop either.

 

 

I would love to hear about dry forge welding if you can find some time to talk about it.

 

 

Regards

Loyd Shindelbower

Loveland colorado

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