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Jeff Pringle

Beer = better forging?

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Photographic evidence that beer, or in this case even a beerlike substance (don't knock the cheap stuff, it's good for hot work! ;) ) does in fact equal better forging. It's a 1050 spontoon hawk head, totally forged to shape. No grinding or files or hot cuts used at this stage of the game. The corncob pipe helps as well. :lol:

 

beer_forging.jpg

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PBR definitely ain't beer, bro.

 

Where do we draw the line?

Edited by J.Arthur Loose

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Photographic evidence that beer, or in this case even a beerlike substance (don't knock the cheap stuff, it's good for hot work! ;) ) does in fact equal better forging. It's a 1050 spontoon hawk head, totally forged to shape. No grinding or files or hot cuts used at this stage of the game. The corncob pipe helps as well. :lol:

 

beer_forging.jpg

 

 

 

OH, so that is how the game is played huh? Well let me work on a few thing without "THE influence" and we'll see just what you can do. Maybe i should forge some more sewing needles?

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AM I THE ONLY SMITH WHO DOES NOT LIKE BEER!>!?!??! I ASK YOU HEPHAESTUS?!?! WHY!??!

 

Sam, you're not the only one. I prefer a bit of scotch. It'll keep you warm and get your blood flowing better than any beer I've ever had.

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PBR definitely ain't beer, bro.

 

Where do we draw the line?

 

:lol: While standard American lagers may be a legitimate brew (heck, I won't turn one down if it's handed to me) there are a number of MUCH better beers for not a whole lot more (like Sierra Nevada or Sam Adams for instance). I'll have to say on a hot hot day an ice cold Coors (or insert your own choice of a similar big beer, doesn't make much difference) quenches a thirst awful good, but then so does water. -_- I watched Jesse brew up a batch of all-grain beer last weekend, I'm now much closer to trying the homebrew route myself!

 

PBR does seem to have something of a cult following for some reason. As far as scotch goes, I guess I just haven't had a really good scotch yet, because I'd much rather have something like a Dogfish Head 90 minute IPA! I just wish they didn't cost so much, getting good beers distributed way down here to Florida bumps the cost up something awful. You guys living up Northeast or on the West coast have it made!

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...oh and Sam, like me a scotch, I think you just haven't had the right beer yet!

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Currently halfway down a pint of Hobgoblin, which claims to be "Strong dark Ale" I'm elclined to agree.

It's the unofficial halloween beer. The catchline on the paper was "What's the matter, Lager-boy? Afraind you might taste something?"

Edited by Nick Steele

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OOO. OUCH! Now I'm going to have to pick some of that up! (And there is nothing wrong with CERTAIN lagers)

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As I said, PBR is a beerlike substance. NOT beer. It has its uses. ;)

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OOO. OUCH! Now I'm going to have to pick some of that up! (And there is nothing wrong with CERTAIN lagers)

You're absolutely right

A cool Grolsch is very nice in the summer, but for a cold autumn night...

Hobgoblin is made by Wychwood, if you're interested.

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Yeah I DO have to agree. Ale while it's cold just...well fits. Wychwood got it. I'll be on the look out for it. Thanks. Man some hot butter rum sounds good right now.

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Yeah I DO have to agree. Ale while it's cold just...well fits. Wychwood got it. I'll be on the look out for it. Thanks. Man some hot butter rum sounds good right now.

 

I haven't had Hobgoblin since last year and I seem to rememeber a bit of difference from six pack to six pack that I bought (one being really good and one not so good). Overall I think it's a pretty good English brown, but I thought it needed a bit of something that I couldn't quite put my finger on. I believe they are now using brown bottles which can only help. I want to say it seemd like it could have been more carbonated and despite it's deep color seemed a bit watery in the taste. I should buy one of this years brewings and see how it compares to what I remember from last year.

 

If you like English style brown ales there are a number of tasty American offerings. The Sam Adams Brown Ale is pretty good and last night I poured an Ellie's Brown Ale from Avery Brewing and I'm really starting to like this style and highly recomend it. Deep brown hue with an amber glow, nice head and a wonderful malty chocolate taste with a dry finish with just a hint of hops to balance things. Definitely pour these beers and let them warm a bit! I've heard the American style brown from Brooklyn Brewery is good as well and is next on my list to try.

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For English ales I seem to prefer the funkier ones to the more marketed ones. I don't care for Newcastle Brown, for instance, but Old Peculier suits me perfectly. Spitfire and just about anything by Fullers of London or Young's is nice as well.

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I really like Sam Adams Boston Lager, but it seems that's all I can get my hands on here of Sam. Someone told me that the winter ale is superb. I'm so glad no one has chimed in on how great miller or bud lite is good. If I get into a beer discussion at work over half the people always come in with some remark about piss water. nasty. Just my opinion.

Edited by Mike Sheffield

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Sam Adams winter lager and ale are both good, and their pale ale is the only mass-produced American one that even approximates the true English style in my opinion. Despite the photographic evidence of me enjoying a watery beerlike substance at the forge above, the ONLY time I partake of such things is at the forge or after mowing and trimming our two acres, as even my wife admits it's not really beer. :lol:

 

Generally when given my druthers I'll take a Guinness or any English Ordinary bitter. Unless I'm feeling the need for something heavier, in which case one of the many Belgian ales is in order. I prefer trippels, especially Chimay Cinq Cents. It's a little strong to forge on, though... :wacko:

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Generally when given my druthers I'll take a Guinness or any English Ordinary bitter. Unless I'm feeling the need for something heavier, in which case one of the many Belgian ales is in order. I prefer trippels, especially Chimay Cinq Cents. It's a little strong to forge on, though... :wacko:

 

 

Yeah.... bitters are good. I found I am a fan of most british styles. I have to admit that if you like belgians, that's reason enough to get into brewing..... you can brew an all grain belgian for 12 to 15 bucks (5 gallons)if you harvest yeast, instead of 8 to 10 bucks for a little over a pint! :wacko:

 

I don't know what's more fun, brewing beer or drinking it!

 

(oh wait.... yeah I do :lol: )

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Dopplebocks and Octoberfests/Marzens are great! Don't care much for the really hoppy beers except for an IPA a guy in our homebrew club made last year, it was one of the best beers I've ever had.

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Oh, I brew! Well, I used to.... :unsure: I've been meaning to set up a keg system in the shop fridge for the last five years, as I stopped brewing because I hate bottling so much. :lol: I used to use mini-kegs, but lost 'em all during the last move. I had five minikegs full of an Old Peculier-esque strong dark ale, and the friends helping us move accidentally left them in the sun on the hottest day of the year. I didn't know until I heard the second "Ka-BOOM!" :blink:

 

Lately all I do is five gallons of dandelion wine every other year, for medicinal purposes of course. ;)

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I've only brewed two batches so far but have acquired a lot of equipment. Once I graduate I either need to get to work filling my ~20 corny kegs or get rid of them to make more room for shop/smithing equipment :)

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Oh, I brew! Well, I used to.... :unsure: I've been meaning to set up a keg system in the shop fridge for the last five years, as I stopped brewing because I hate bottling so much. :lol: I used to use mini-kegs, but lost 'em all during the last move. I had five minikegs full of an Old Peculier-esque strong dark ale, and the friends helping us move accidentally left them in the sun on the hottest day of the year. I didn't know until I heard the second "Ka-BOOM!" :blink:

 

Lately all I do is five gallons of dandelion wine every other year, for medicinal purposes of course. ;)

 

 

I hear ya.... I did minikegs for a while... they really do like to blow up on you. Honestly, I use 2 liters and force carb with a carbonator cap and gun. I usually trasnsfer it to a one liter before carbing if I think I'll only have a little. I am with you on the bottling.... if I had to bottle, I probably wouldn't be brewing! :blink:

 

Dandelion wine..... that would be nice.

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After reading this thread, it's very tempting to aks for a brewing kit for christmas...

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DRINK VERMONT BEER.

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I've just finished a pint of Old Peculier.

It's like drinking alcoholic treacle with hops. ^_^

Edited by Nick Steele

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I've just finished a pint of Old Peculier.

It's like drinking alcoholic treacle with hops. ^_^

 

 

Yeah, that's the basic recipe. :lol: Lyle's golden syrup rather than black treacle, and lots of dark-roasted barley malt, but yeah. B)

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