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Forging a stick or threw tang


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Using Godzilla makes tangs one heck of alot easier and alot less time consumming. Normally zilla is used durring the first heat and that is it except on larger material. I've got the pictures in sequence. After using zilla the tang resembles an oldman. Next heat I'll set it on the anvil and hammer out the indents. Not a whole lot to it and I hope the pictures will help. I'll be here off and on for any questions. Last picture is after 5 heats. I'll normally stop forging out the tang when it gets to be around 4" and around 1/2" in width on the end. If I make it any narrower my box jaw tongs won't work. Once I have the blade all finished I'll normally heat up the end of the tang with a torch and forge it out the rest of the way. 99% of my knives I'll forge the tang first.

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Edited by Raymond Richard
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RAY-- I have a Guilintine fuller with two notches, one for 1/2" another for 3/4". I use the space between the two to neck down the tangs. I use the 3/4" fuller mainly to neck down one inch burner tubes / that gives it the added kick.

 

Chuck Bennett

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After seeing Ray's swage at a hammer in I built three of them 1/4" 3/8" and 1/2". They have many uses and I am always finding a few more. Leaf spring works well and comes in many different thicknesses.

 

They don't draw out as fast as a straight peen hammer does but it's much more uniform. I would never even attempt an integral w/o one.

I use a cheapo HF cast hammer since hardened leaf spring will tear the heck out whatever hammer you use.

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Thanks Raymond! I'm going to make one of those. Looks way easier than a standard guillotine fuller (no welding!). Does it just sit on the face of the anvil or does something hold it in place?

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Maybe I should flatten out some of my spring tooth and piece me one together.

 

Is it hardened at all?

Could have my neighbor cut me 4 lengths to make one from.

forge them flat. Would make it easier to drill as well. Maybe have him weld on a piece for the pritchel hole (Isn't that the smaller hole?) or hardy.

Or just cut one upright piece smaller to fit the hardy. Hrm...not a bad idea.

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Thanks Raymond! I'm going to make one of those. Looks way easier than a standard guillotine fuller (no welding!). Does it just sit on the face of the anvil or does something hold it in place?

 

Guy, If you look hard at the top picture you can see the bottom of it going threw the hardy hole. On the vertical piece that is facing the front I cut the bottom 5/8" wide and about 2" long and that is whats in the hardy hole.

 

Edgar, I did harden the top piece. I think I drew it back some but I can't remember.

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Mine are all air cool temper since I had to heat them to straighten them out. Over a year later they show no signs of flatening out and I have used them alot. Drilling those 1/2" holes is also a whole lot easier then if they were still hardened.

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Here's mine. Forged from some kind of machine shaft. 1" round

 

tt002-8.jpg

 

But of course, if you must improvise, you can do like I did when starting out. It works awfully, but it works. Hammer some spikes into the top of a log as the guides, have the bottom bar in there, hold the work in your crotch, hold the top fuller bar w/ one hand, and swing the hammer w/ your other hand. Shyeah, it sucks.

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Guy, If you look hard at the top picture you can see the bottom of it going threw the hardy hole. On the vertical piece that is facing the front I cut the bottom 5/8" wide and about 2" long and that is whats in the hardy hole.

 

Edgar, I did harden the top piece. I think I drew it back some but I can't remember.

 

Ah, I see it now, thanks Raymond. 1/2" thick stock or so? Hmmm...I wonder what I've got laying around here.

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Ah, I see it now, thanks Raymond. 1/2" thick stock or so? Hmmm...I wonder what I've got laying around here.

 

The thinnest steel that I have used was 3/8" but like Brent mentioned I think he had said he made one out of 1/4". I find for doing stick tangs 1/2" works better because it doesn't go as deep. The one in the photo is out of 5/8" 1065 stock that I got mainly for doing axes and tomahawks. If you have a piece of stock that will fit in your hardy hole it can be used for one vertical side. The other side can be just about anything you have on hand. Just make sure the other side fits flush on the anvil face. Nice thing about using the bolts to hold it together is it will allow you to replace worn out pieces.

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Ray, Thats a great Idea. Have you payed with the idea of a valvespring or something mounted near the pivot between the "jaws" to hold it open for you? Shawn

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My 1/4" one will actually hot cuts pretty fast and it notches very aggresively also.

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Ray, Thats a great Idea. Have you payed with the idea of a valvespring or something mounted near the pivot between the "jaws" to hold it open for you? Shawn

 

I've never had a suggestion about using a spring but several have told me they have run the top piece out longer on the back pivot so they just need to use there hammer to open it up. The way it is now is just fine with me. I can still open it up manually. I've got another 3 months and I'll hit 60. Maybe by then I'll need more help. :excl:

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Thanks for sharing the info... I see one of these in my near future as well. No problem with the nuts loosening up? Also wondering if that bottom "fuller" doesn't mar the face of your anvil at all? I was thinking of putting a flat plate under the bottom fuller to distribute the force a little over the anvil face.

 

Looks like it's working really well as is and is certainly easy enough to make...

 

Thanks again.

-Andy

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Thanks for sharing the info... I see one of these in my near future as well. No problem with the nuts loosening up? Also wondering if that bottom "fuller" doesn't mar the face of your anvil at all? I was thinking of putting a flat plate under the bottom fuller to distribute the force a little over the anvil face.

 

Looks like it's working really well as is and is certainly easy enough to make...

 

Thanks again.

-Andy

 

 

Andy, I've got lock washers that help keep things tight although I have the top nut on the movable piece not as snug as the others. Its a good idea to check that one every once in awhile. I haven't noticed any damage on the surface of the anvil and its been used a lot. I see no need for a flat plate on the bottom.

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Homemade tools are cool.

 

I made my guillotine fuller with some 5/16" plate. It notches pretty tightly and comes in handy for necking down tangs, fullering, etc. In these pictures I'm using it to establish the bolsters on an integral hunter.

 

ih3.jpg

 

ih4.jpg

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Well I started mine today.

Wish I'd have had time to make it over to the neighbors. Did mine by hot cutting. Then spent the afternoon drilling holes BLECH.

That was a bit of a pain.

 

Have a little grinding and tweaking but I think it'll work.

I'll take some pictures of the ugly thing once I get it done and doing it's job.

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Well I started mine today.

Wish I'd have had time to make it over to the neighbors. Did mine by hot cutting. Then spent the afternoon drilling holes BLECH.

That was a bit of a pain.

 

Have a little grinding and tweaking but I think it'll work.

I'll take some pictures of the ugly thing once I get it done and doing it's job.

 

If it ugly and it works you've won. Good luck!

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I bought a spring fuller form Blacksmiths Depot,but i couldn't keep the set screws frombacking out after about 3 whacks, so I got a guillotine fuller from Pieh Tool. Works MUCH better. i don't have to wedge bigger stock into it like with the spring fuller. Badnews is that I used it to smashout some big W2 round stock and gave myself a good case of tendonitis.

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