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Sam Salvati

Not blades, but still HOT WORK

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Here is how the old anchors and anchor chains were made. You'd never beleive it if you didn't see these videos :blink: .

 

 

Part one

 

 

Part two

 

 

I love how that guy makes the chain link in like one heat, then welds it on in one more.

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That is simply impressive !!!

They sure knew how to work back then !

 

I'd like to see the forge size needed to heat those chunks !

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That is simply impressive !!!

They sure knew how to work back then !

 

I'd like to see the forge size needed to heat those chunks !

 

 

 

In the one part, you can kinda see the coal forge, with a mound of coal usually the size of some people's entire coal bin! I liek the part where the one guy is making the singular links with the oliver hammer and has that little foot operated door that raises and lowers in front of his forge, which must be running at close to welding heat nonstop, for what looks like 1 or 2 inch rounds.

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Having made some chain for my blacksmithing class, I can say that the larger the stock, the easier things go because the heavy stuff holds it's heat longer. Now I want to try some 1" round for class on Thursday ^_^

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Was very cool to see, even showed my parents and they thought it was very neat.

 

Just ordered a link of 1.5" diameter ship chain from Darren Ellis. One link though. haha

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Hi Sam,

 

nice link you dug up there.

 

I especially like the scene at the end of part 1, when there are about seven guys hitting one place with their huge hammers (you can see one waiting for a while´til he finds his place to fit into the rhythm) - now that´s teamwork!

 

 

Christoph

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Hi Sam,

 

nice link you dug up there.

 

I especially like the scene at the end of part 1, when there are about seven guys hitting one place with their huge hammers (you can see one waiting for a while´til he finds his place to fit into the rhythm) - now that´s teamwork!

Christoph

 

Thanks:D. Yeah that was funny, that was amazing with so many strikers!

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Hi again,

 

Sven from the german Messerforum also posted these yesterday adding another link to the list:

 

from 1904 (my preciousss :D )

 

He also dug up some very nice Historical Books from the American Libraries archive site:

 

Here

 

all beautifully scanned to .pdf and various other formats - a great resource!

 

 

Christoph

 

 

edit: the fourth and fifth book are from opelibrary.org and only for online-reading

Edited by Christoph Alpermann

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Hi again,

 

Sven from the german Messerforum also posted these yesterday adding another link to the list:

 

from 1904 (my preciousss :D )

 

He also dug up some very nice Historical Books from the American Libraries archive site:

 

Here

 

all beautifully scanned to .pdf and various other formats - a great resource!

Christoph

edit: the fourth and fifth book are from opelibrary.org and only for online-reading

 

 

Thank you Christoph! Cool links! That ring is MASSIVE(MY PRECIOUS indeed!).

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WOW, those are amazing!!!!! :D THANKS!

 

What I would give to be able to walk through those mills and watch those men work. They'd probably think I'm nuts being so awed by something they drudge through day in and day out to provide for their families!

 

Watching all those men pein that pin in the end of part one was nuts. Can you believe they can all be swinging 10-12 lb. hammers like that in such rythym??? WOW!

 

It easy to see why industrial accidents helped the life expectancy be so low back then :o

 

Also, did you notice they were all swinging "Japanese cutlers" hammers? ;):D

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also..how would you like to have to be wearing a neck tie while doing all that? :)

 

truly amazing.

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Sam , those are super sources for you and others !! Put them on a CD a read again and again.

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Nick, if I had a long hard day at work, i come home and watch those videos again, and then immediately get a ton of energy after I realise how LITTLE I had done that day:D Yeah Robert, I am tryign to get them burned to a dvd or cd.

 

also..how would you like to have to be wearing a neck tie while doing all that? :)

 

truly amazing.

 

 

Hehe, they probably were buit the poor tie melted:D.

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I wish I could find a way to download them so I could put them on a cd or dvd.

That's only bad thing about being on you tube, I can't find a way to download it.

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I wish I could find a way to download them so I could put them on a cd or dvd.

That's only bad thing about being on you tube, I can't find a way to download it.

 

 

This site has both of the chain videos:

http://www.allshops.org/index_blacksmiths.shtml

 

This one has both parts of the "big ring" video

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?amme...LLID+workleis))

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