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Been lurking around here for a few days now. New to this site, but not to smithing. Great site folks! Lots of useful info. Have a question. Got hold of a leaf spring, think it's 6150. More difficult to move under hammer than 5160 or 10xx series steels. Grinds SLOW acts like it tries to gauld (balls up somewhat when heavy pressure is applied) have to really look to see this. Also takes awhile to start oxidizing when emersed in water. Is assuming 6150 right or could it be something else. Gordon J

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Found the answer I was looking for. Just had to look a little harder. Again folks Great Site!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Almost positive it's 6150. Going by what I've heard, read, and seen. Had previous experience with same piece of spring. This stuff is not very forgiving. Had to grind it slow. Would bog down my grinder with new 36 grit belt. But did'nt seem to be take much metal for the efforts. Must be the vanadium. That stuff is extremely wear resistant!!!!!!!!

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Tai Goo gave me some round bar stock of 6150 to play with once. Forged out some beautiful blades. It does move harder under the hammer, filed nicely and was a pita to grind, as you described. Tried turning some on my Taig lathe. Now THAT'S something I never want to attempt on anything but an industrial lathe!

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Tai Goo gave me some round bar stock of 6150 to play with once. Forged out some beautiful blades. It does move harder under the hammer, filed nicely and was a pita to grind, as you described. Tried turning some on my Taig lathe. Now THAT'S something I never want to attempt on anything but an industrial lathe!

 

 

 

 

My Hofi hammer is made from 6150.

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My experience with 6150 is that it moves a little stiff but shuts off hard as it cools a little. The transition between moving and not moving is pretty quick. It scales fairly lightly and the scale is thin. It grinds easily and I haven't seen it gaul (sp?). It rusts quickly while grinding and cooling. It polishes great with a crisp silver color, almost like a 10xx steel. The finished product is very tough. The stuff I have is definately 6150. Hope that helps.

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Gall is the proper spelling and galling is cold welding of two parts rubbing against each other. I don't think galling is the appropriate term for the grinding problem......Somewhere deep in my memory I remember that our bayonets where once made of 6150.

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Is this the same stuff usually called "chrom Vanadium steel" on wrenches?

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Well now it seems I am back to where I started. Unknowing!!!!! What ever this stuff is, some of the properties are like 6150. When it starts to cool the hammer does nothing. But it seems to be pretty rust resistant. Long soaks in water barely starts to rust. Even dirty finger prints on a rough ground blade doesn't seem to stain. When grinding with a new 36 grit belt it cuts slower than 10xx steels. And seems to not get as hot as fast either. This has been a dilima but I quess thats what you get for working with unknown steels !!Thanks for all the replies folks and anymore would be appreciated. Sorry it took so long for me to reply, but I've been in the hospital having back surgery. So it will be a little while before I can heat treat and finish the blade. Hope to soon be able to post some pics. Thanks again folks.

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Hi Gordon,

 

Is the steel you are working with from a leaf or a coil spring. I could be wrong but, I thought that the only 6150 springs were leaf springs used on dump trucks and other heavy duty vehicles. The steel you have described seems like it could be 9260. I've forged one knife from 6150 rod given to me by Tim Crocker and liked it very much. My experiences with it are pretty much in line with other people here. This stuff gets stiff really fast when it cools, I worked it a bit hotter than I do my 10xx stuff and had no problems getting it to move. I had problems bogging down my grinder when I did my rough grinding (36 grit AO belt on a Grizzly Knifemakers Grinder.) I wound up doing a lot of hand filing on the knife and the file had to be aligned perfectly to the blade or else it just did not cut. This steel rusted very easily, even more so than my 10xx stuff.

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It was a piece of leaf spring off a lowboy trailer. Made a knife out of the same piece of spring a couple years back. I quench in heated transmission fluid. As quenched it's as hard a glass. Tempered it twice at 400 an hour and half each time. Did edge flex on brass rod and chopped a deer leg bone with no damage to edge. Hand sanded down to 400 grit. At 320 grit started to see a definite hamon. And like I said before it does not rust easily. I appreciate any input and all replies. Seems to be a lot of smart, helpful smiths in here. Thanks again Gordon

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