Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hello.

Do any of you farm/raise some of your own food? I'm wondering because my family has decided to start growing more of our own food. We've got potatoes growing in our windowsills, and beans in a broken old bathtub, and we're going to raise more chickens so that we can eat them as well as their eggs, and know that they were treated well.

Do any of you garden or raise your own food? What do you grow?

Thanks,

Archie :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

I live on an eight acre mini farm. We grow veggies and have numerous fruit trees and berry bushes. Our chickens are great layers and our pygmy goats are the composters.

 

We live next to the Bald Hills at an elevation of just under 1000' so we are limited on what we can grow. Our last frost has been in early June and the first has been early Sept. All of the root veggies do well and we have a 10x16 greenhouse to start the tomatoes, peppers and melons.

 

Our goats and chickens provide plenty of fertilizer so we do not use chemical or any pest/herbacides. I even grew tobacco for several years and it did real well.

 

If you visit your local plant nursery they can tell you what climate zone you are in and what plants will grow the best. If you like peppers cayenne, jalapeno, Thai dragon and the bananna peppers do well in almost every climate. I grow them in car tires along with tomatoes and all of the melons. The tires hold the heat over night and slow down water evaporation. No matter what you grow it will taste a hundred times better then any store produce and much higher nutrients. Since we are on a well we use night drip irrigation which uses 80% less water.

 

We also can, freeze and dehydrate enough to last at least a year.

Edited by B Finnigan
Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a fairly large garden here and I will be making it larger to accommodate a green house this year, We live on 13.5 acres and also raise horses (8) and cattle(2). We just butchered a steer just before christmas he was 18 months old and weighed 1600 lbs he yielded 1039 lbs of meat.

The horses and cattle produce lots of manure. We live in the Pacific North Wet just below Brent and we are at 1800' so our growing season is short as well, we also had nearly 60" of rain last year and the garden did not do well because of it. We also hay 8+ acres for the live stock.

We also have lots of fruit trees that we eat fresh and can as well as berries that we grow and the best thing here is the abundant of wild berries mostly blackberries and huckleberries.

 

There is nothing better than home grown foods!!!!!!! :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in a subdivision in the suburbs of Tallahassee so a large garden wasn't really feasible due to the drain field of our septic system. However there was plenty of space for small scale and container gardening. I'm a big proponent of organic gardening and using a method known as square-foot gardening used to grow Blue Lake and Kentucky Wonder pole beans, Sweet One-Hundred cherry tomatos, yellow summer squash and cucumbers, all in a very small garden. Being in a sub-tropical zone that still gets feezes is challenging to say the least. Our high summers are really our fallow season, tomatos succumb to viral wilts and most varieties stop setting fruit because our overnight temperatres are too high much of the year. Our soils are poor, sand or clay, which means additions of large quantities of compost, however compost dissapears at an amazing rate from the soil in our climate zone. Add huge numbers of voracious insects, tons of viral plant diseases all on top of cycles of too much rain and drought, high heat and humidity and the possibility of late March or even early April hard freezes makes gardeining here challenging. We had an insane golden retreiver for a while that destroyed everything in our yard and made gardening impossible so I got out of the habit of planting and maintaining things. I really ought to get back into it though, my kids miss it and I really loved having fresh herbs from the containers. It's hard to beat freshly picked basil or pole beans and tomatos right off the vines!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Every year I grow heirloom tomatoes, peppers ,cucumbers,beans and several kinds of herbs.I love home grown tomatoes there is nothing like them in the stores even the high priced vine tomatoes don't come close.Fresh garden salsa with every thing but the onions(to much trouble) from the backyard can't beat it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It also depends on how much land you have access to.

I have a 3 acre pasture. I raise a coupla goats, mostly

for weed control. I do get week old dairy/beef cow cross

bullocks form a local dairy for $25. That requires bottle

feeding twice a day for a few weeks.18 -24 months later

have it butchered.If you and yours can stand eating something

that you have bottle fed. I also grain feed it 3-4 weeks prior

to butchering.I buy one a year to have several of various sizes

(4 kids to feed)

I keep 6-8 hens in an enclosed pen. They eat ALL

kitchen scraps. You will get 4-5 eggs a week per chicken.

I have never raised meat chickens, layers after several years

of production are tuff. I grind them up use in sausage

Link to post
Share on other sites

I also grow alot in 5 ga buckets. There is less weeding, rototilling and watering. You can also move them around for the best sun exposure. Each spring I dump the soil from three of them into the wheel barrow and work in chicken manure, volcanic pumice and peat moss. The straw mulch from the previou year has mostly broken down and becomes fertilizer for the next season.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 months later...
I also grow alot in 5 ga buckets. There is less weeding, rototilling and watering. You can also move them around for the best sun exposure. Each spring I dump the soil from three of them into the wheel barrow and work in chicken manure, volcanic pumice and peat moss. The straw mulch from the previou year has mostly broken down and becomes fertilizer for the next season.

 

 

I work on my father's farm. Prior to this year we were pretty much exclusivally floral oriented, with the exception of pumpkins, and a few acres of tomatoes, brocolli, and colliflower, however we have really taken a step into the produce market this year. We have planted over 100 acres of sweet corn, a decent amount of string beans, peppers, and a larger amount of tomatoes, broccolli and coliflower.

 

 

Additionally, through some land that we are renting, we have inherited an established peach orchard, as well as an apple orchard, strawberries, and a few acres of raspberries and blackberries.

 

We farm a little over 1000 acres all together.

 

Edit: I just realized I dug up an old topic. I am sorry. I accessed it through seeing another members posts through their profile and didn't notice the date.

Edited by Jake Durr
Link to post
Share on other sites

I am redeveloping the acreage that I grew up on. I have a 30 by 50 foot garden with beets beans peas which are all done now and Tobacco. Yea still smokin and chewwin.

We live in town 2 miles from the acreage and there we planted our tomatoes cucumbers spagetti squash and more tobacco. The reason for the bedding style plants in town is it is easyer to water them on a regular basis.

Next year we wnat to plant some norland apple trees along wiht somechokecherries and a bunch of saskatoon bushs. Many of you may be unfamiliur with saskatoons but they are a hardy prairy grown fruit that tastes simular to blueberries but preserve and frezze better.

Many Canucks prefer the taste of saskatoons to blueberries and in this area they have many centureis history.

The indians that roamed tis area mixed the berries into pemican to add more vitemans. Many wars were fought to protect the bushs from opposing tribes.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...