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surface grinder


guarnera
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O.K. I went and did it. I bought the Harbor Frieght Surface grinder. However, I have never used one, so be prepared for some questions that might seem stupid to those experienced machinists out there.

 

First off. Sitting or standing in front of the machine looking directly at it, and the wheel is turning clockwise. Is the worked moved from left to right? or right to left ? I would think from left to rigth, but don't really know.

 

Second. After the first pass, do you go back over the first pass in reverse before moving the table over for the second pass? Or do you move it over after the first pass, and do the second pass in the reverse direction?

 

Third. How much is it acceptable to move the table over for each consecutive pass? And How much is it acceptable to lower the grinding head after the work piece has been done with the first series of passes?

 

Forth. The only Surface grinder I've seen in use belongs to a friend of mine, and it has a flood coolant system on it. Many grinders don't have coolant systems, so I imagine you have to grind dry. Is there a big problem with airbourn grinding dust and grit? I will make a dust collector for it.

 

Thank you for any help That you could give me. I Googled the heck out of this topic, and couldn't find anything on how to use a surface grinder.

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I'm a machinist, I've ran a surface grinder a little but I'm not an expert, I'm a lathe guy. First question, depending on the machine it may make one pass before the wheel feeds over, if it has an auto feed. From your question it probably doesn't, ours goes back and forth before moving the head. Going back over it wouldn't do any damage I've gone back and forth without moving the head to get the wheel the right height. I have the head move about half the wheel width, it's an old grinder with a narrow wheel. Lowering the grinding wheel is the important one, I don't know what you're grinding or how powerful the magnet is, RPM, feed rate, wheels can explode, and parts go flying. Obviously don't ever stand where the work is moving toward and away from you. After going completely over the part I lower the wheel .002-.003, but I'm a bit of a sissy about it. Get yourself a little giant coolant pump from enco or msc, you should be able to get some concentrate you mix with water from a local supplier. Grinding grit is BAD for you, a fan behind you or wearing a mask is a GOOD idea, good glasses too, yeah, I'm the safety committee chairman. You could let it run a while without anything in it, or with the head raised up high to get a good idea about what it's doing. The homeshop machinist has some journeyman machinists there that could help you. I hope you enjoy your machine you can do some neat stuff with them. I hope this helps. Jim Pennock

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Good info above. I have made many folders and have been using an old SG for around 10 years. First, the wheel is very important. I use a Norton 46 grit induced porosity, med hardness wheel and grind dry with a dust collector attached. Cheap wheels are not worth the savings. I set the grinder to take off .005 and feed the part in a 1/4 turn of the handle wheel or .015 - .020. I grind both ways, moving the part in .015-.020 for each pass. After covering the entire surface, I drop the grinding wheel down .005 and repeat the above. After taking .015 off one side I flip the part and take the same off the other side, I make sure to take the same off both sides, this will hold warping to a minimum. Some will say this is too aggresive stock removal but it works for me and is the fastest way for me to get good accurate results. Hope this helps.

Edited by Don Hanson

Don Hanson lll My Webpage

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Yes defineatly build your self a dust colector.........

you will need a diamond tip tool dresser and holder to clean up your grinding wheel and give you the optimal finish smoothness.......it is used by holding the tool holder on the magnetic table and running the tool dresser under the grinding wheel just as if you were trying to surface grind the diamond tip. only take off .001 or .002 at a time........ I usualy clean up my wheel after I have made the rough cuts and just before the last finish grind.......

I use the dry method. I have found that a ruby 36 "open grain"grit. to work the best.......

your worst enemy is heat and the 'Open grain" wheels will create the least heat........ taking off much at time will also create too much heat.......

with tool teel I find if I take more the .001 at a time I will warp the material I'm grinding....... the thinner you are gringing something the eaier it will be to warp it........ you can grind in all 4 directions. it doesn't realy mater which way you go. but the whole surface needs to be done before you lower the wheel for the next pass .........

and saftey glasses are a must!!!!!!!!!

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Can you post a picture of your surface grinder?

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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Can you post a picture of your surface grinder?

 

 

Sorry Sam,

I'm a computor idiot. I don't know how to do that yet. And I just got it and its not completly set up yet. When it is, I can take some pictures, but some one would have to walk me through the process of posting them. However, If you go to Grizzly .com and type in surfacegrinder, its the cheapest one. They have the best picture of it. I actually bought it from Harbor Frieght because its the same machine but cheaper. It was $899.00 for a very long time. I would check on it often. But the week I get the cash together and go to buy it, the price had gone up to $999.00. Figures? I got this into a corner in the garage and covered up with moving blankets without the wife knowing, it's on a rolling base. I think she's catching on, because when she sees a new machine in the garage and asks what that is, I tell her what it is, but I say that I had it for years, it was just out in the shed all this time. I don't know if she will buy that line again when she see's it. The next thing I have to do is get the Fly Press I'm getting delivered and into the forging shed without her knowing. She never goes out there.

 

Tony

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