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I found this while walking some railroad tracks a while back. Does anyone know what it is for or what it is made of? I have two of these about 10 inches long and 1.5 inch dia. They are clean cut on one end and looks to be broken off on the other. Looks like a hammer head or two could be hiding in them. Any thoughts?

 

Larry

 

 

Larry__s_knife_004_copy.jpg

When the world ends, I want to be in Kentucky because they are 25 years behind everybody else. Mark Twain

 

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NICE SCORE! I would punch and drift one hole in the holed end, after cleaning up the other, and make a Japanese sledge! Sorry, not too much I can offer on steel type and stuff. Try asking this question on www.iforgeiron.com, alot of old RR workers there.

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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I have a stump anvil made out of one of those it out well. i hardened in oil and mine would be to soft for a hammer (the anvil mushrooms abit) but water or brine might work well.

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I too found one of these on a railroad tracks. But I find the other side, that is curved and is a kind of whrench, low carbon steel but interesting size. I can't imagine how can this tool break.

Mourir pour des idées, c'est bien beau mais lesquelles?

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Here are some pix of the other end. Doesent look like a torch was used, no slag, but it almost has to have been cut and not broken. I dont know what I will do with them.

Larry

 

mysterymetal_002_copy.jpg

 

mysterymetal_005_copy.jpg

When the world ends, I want to be in Kentucky because they are 25 years behind everybody else. Mark Twain

 

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Nice fracture - as Alan indicated, it looks like an impact fracture. You can see the initiation site (the V points to the origin) and the shear lip at the opposite side of the fracture. In the side view picture, there looks like a little thumbnail - it could also be a notch.

 

I love looking at fracture surfaces - I spent many years doing failure analysis for a major airframe manufacturer...landing gear failures, and that sort of thing.

 

Scott

D. Scott MacKenzie, PhD

Heat Treating (Aluminum and Steel)

Quenching (Water, Polymer, Oil, Salt and Mar-Tempering)

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It is hard to imagine stock that size being fractured but I thought thats what it looked like.

Larry

When the world ends, I want to be in Kentucky because they are 25 years behind everybody else. Mark Twain

 

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Here's an even bigger fracture.

 

It's from a piece of machinery that I only know as a 'bull prick', think of a jack hammer mounted on the end of a back hoe. The thing is 6" diameter! I have the other end of it, also, it spit this chip out when it failed.. I figure the other end is near 200 pounds, and tough enough to make a great post anvil once I get it mounted up..

 

Josh

 

It is hard to imagine stock that size being fractured but I thought thats what it looked like.

Larry

CAM_1023_copy.jpg

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Hi larry , I worked at a rail car manufacturer for a while, national steel car. These pins are used to hold the trucks to the body of the car.Every one will feel safe now....ha.ha! . Theye keep the truck and car in alignment if the car should jump the wheels would stay on or in place.

We called them bull pins, brand new theye measure about 18" to 24".

I have no clue as to what steel make up theye are ( I could find out).

I can tell you this theye don't just fall out and off the car? Ill call an old friend and have him read the ISO tag for further info.

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Darrin, thanks for the info. It would be great to know what they are made of. I was thinking of using one of them like an anvil horn. The evenness would be good for putting curves in things.

Larry

When the world ends, I want to be in Kentucky because they are 25 years behind everybody else. Mark Twain

 

My Webpage

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