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Unfinished 5160 blade with hamon


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I'm excited. I should know better than to post pix of unfinished stuff but I'm all giggly about having beat the "cool hamon on low alloy" problem. I'm pretty happy with the visual appeal and the performance and it has taken me a few years to get this down.

 

SaNFriends2.jpg

 

I'm actually getting utsuri, nie/nioi, a big fat habuchi and a bunch of other Japanese words/effects as well as some stuff I have never or rarely seen in Japanese sword blades. I'm a happy camper and will certainly show better pictures of these style of blades as I finish them and get them mounted and polished.

 

SaHamon3.jpg

 

Thanks for looking and a special public Thank You to Howard Clark, Randal Graham, and Mike Blue for the support and friendship. I never would have discovered this stuff without you guys and I'd have missed out on some very thrilling and satisfying moments playing in the fire if I'd not have learned this.

 

Brian

"Imagination is more important than knowledge" - Albert Einstein

 

"The innovator is not an opponent of the old. He is a proponent of the new."

- Lyle E. Schaller

 

http://home.mchsi.com/~hermits/BrianRVanSp..._Edged_Art.html

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Brian

 

I would be interested in how you get your hammons to be so pronounced, especially in 5160, I have a little luck but nothing quite like yours. Please give a detailed workup of your heat treating.

John W Smith
www.smith-forge.org

Fire and wind come from the sky, from the gods of the sky. But Crom is your god, Crom and he lives in the earth. Once, giants lived in the Earth, Conan. And in the darkness of chaos, they fooled Crom, and they took from him the enigma of steel. Crom was angered. And the Earth shook. Fire and wind struck down these giants, and they threw their bodies into the waters, but in their rage, the gods forgot the secret of steel and left it on the battlefield. We who found it are just men. Not gods. Not giants. Just men. The secret of steel has always carried with it a mystery. You must learn its riddle, Conan. You must learn its discipline. For no one - no one in this world can you trust. Not men, not women, not beasts.

[Points to sword]

This you can trust

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I'm excited. I should know better than to post pix of unfinished stuff but I'm all giggly about having beat the "cool hamon on low alloy" problem. I'm pretty happy with the visual appeal and the performance and it has taken me a few years to get this down.

 

SaNFriends2.jpg

 

I'm actually getting utsuri, nie/nioi, a big fat habuchi and a bunch of other Japanese words/effects as well as some stuff I have never or rarely seen in Japanese sword blades. I'm a happy camper and will certainly show better pictures of these style of blades as I finish them and get them mounted and polished.

 

SaHamon3.jpg

 

Thanks for looking and a special public Thank You to Howard Clark, Randal Graham, and Mike Blue for the support and friendship. I never would have discovered this stuff without you guys and I'd have missed out on some very thrilling and satisfying moments playing in the fire if I'd not have learned this.

 

Brian

 

 

Congratulation Brian. Very nice hamons for 5160. Hard work pays off. Are the backs dead soft? I'd be interested to see how a 5160 sword holds up next to a more traditional sword. It would be great if the spine stayed a little springy. Anyway, great work.

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Are the backs dead soft? I'd be interested to see how a 5160 sword holds up next to a more traditional sword. It would be great if the spine stayed a little springy. Anyway, great work.

 

No, the backs are not dead soft at all....I'm guessing them at the mid to upper 40's rc but that is just a guess. They are pretty springy and the edges are so damn hard that sharpening them is very difficult and there seems to be some amount of abrasion resistance beyond what I have nomally been getting in thru hardened and tempered 5160 blades. I may temper them back a bit as this progresses but the edges have not seemed chippy.

 

As soon as I get caught up I'll bust up a few of these but tests some time back showed the backs to be a nice combination of springy but not "boingy" feeling. The longer blades like this definately have a more "dead spined" feel in the cut than a springy feeling to them.

 

Brian

"Imagination is more important than knowledge" - Albert Einstein

 

"The innovator is not an opponent of the old. He is a proponent of the new."

- Lyle E. Schaller

 

http://home.mchsi.com/~hermits/BrianRVanSp..._Edged_Art.html

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congrats Brian, A little info on the process would be quite interesting and appreciated unless it is top secret. :D

anyways very nice blades I can't to see them polished.

"One who is samurai must before all things" Keep constantly in mind, by day and by night. the fact that he has to die...

 

-Dai Doji Yuzon-

16th Century

 

http://sites.google.com/site/canadianliveblade/home

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Nice Brian, very cool looking hamon! I got a hamon and utsuri to show on non clay coated 1075 a few weeks ago.

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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The longer blades like this definately have a more "dead spined" feel in the cut than a springy feeling to them.

 

Brian

 

Awesome hamons for 5160 Brian! So is the "dead spined" feel in a cut a good thing or a bad thing? Or just different? I'm assuming this is coming from your perspective and experience using Japanese style blades cutting mats and such.

Guy Thomas

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I kinda like the dead spined thing from a classic point of view. Realistically, the only time you'll feel the difference is on a long blade and a bad cut where the blade flexes laterally. On good cuts with decent technique (from a sword perspective...) it seems to matter little if the blade is thru hardened and tempered, Bainite, or differentially hardened.

 

The dead spined blades do have a particular feel that I like when working the blade in kata or drawing and cutting where the blade changes directions under force and there is some degree of flexing. The dead spined blades just have a different feel...less lively. They seem to fight you a little less when you make them change directions and they seem to absorb some degree of shock via deflection in a perceptible way.

 

They are all good. Just in different ways.

 

Brian

"Imagination is more important than knowledge" - Albert Einstein

 

"The innovator is not an opponent of the old. He is a proponent of the new."

- Lyle E. Schaller

 

http://home.mchsi.com/~hermits/BrianRVanSp..._Edged_Art.html

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Awesome mastery of heat treatment, sir! :blink: The perfect exception to the low-alloy hamon rule.

 

Any fool can get a hardening line in low alloys via edge-quenching or heavy cross-sectional changes, but this is the first actual active HT artifact in 5160 I have seen that can honestly be called a hamon. B)

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For those with inquiring minds. If you want 'em for further study download 'em to your computer as they are too big to keep for very long on my web space. I kinda have been studying "stuff" like this and so I took the time yesterday to shoot some extreme macro pix and uploaded them uncompressed. I'd like comments on the little black spots and theories about what they are. Maybe just large crystals but I feel they may be clusters of carbides large enough to be seen. The edges of blades heat treated in this manner are *very* abrasion resistant.

 

http://home.mchsi.com/~hermits/Boshi.jpg

 

http://home.mchsi.com/~hermits/kissakilobes.jpg

 

http://home.mchsi.com/~hermits/LobesNSpots.jpg

 

http://home.mchsi.com/~hermits/UtsuriNSpots.jpg

 

http://home.mchsi.com/~hermits/UtsuriNSpots2.jpg

 

http://home.mchsi.com/~hermits/UtsuriNSpots3.jpg

 

http://home.mchsi.com/~hermits/UtsuriSpots.jpg

 

Thanks for looking and comments are welcome.

 

Brian

"Imagination is more important than knowledge" - Albert Einstein

 

"The innovator is not an opponent of the old. He is a proponent of the new."

- Lyle E. Schaller

 

http://home.mchsi.com/~hermits/BrianRVanSp..._Edged_Art.html

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Hay Brain ,

did you put the blades in vinager???

(steeping the blades in hot apple cider vinger will react with the steel and bring out the harmon)

I'v seen hamons like your on L6

needless to say I'm both impressed and jealous!!

Mike

Member:

Cal Knives

Practioner:

Suio Ryu Iai Kenpo

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You're getting some really nice effects there. The spots look just like classic nie -- at least in the pictures. Keep up the good work.

Check out Walter's instructional videos:

Forging Japanese Style Blades

Making Hamons

Japanese Sword Mounting

Polishing

Making Japanese Sword Fittings

www.waltersorrellsblades.com
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