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City Boy Anvil Stump


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Living in the burbs I had hard time finding an old tree stump for my anvil. I had found one but it was a bit short as I pulled it out of someone's fire wood pile instead of being able to cut it to the right size myself.

 

I had some old 2 X 4's and plywood laying around my garage from other projects so I pieced them together into the anvil stand seen in the pictures below. I cut the plywood for the top into 1' X 1' squares and then cut the 2 X 4's in to 1' lengths. The stand is held together with dozens of wood screws also left from another project. I put screws in from both sides so that it was secure and built it up from both sides. Then alternated each row of 2 X 4's screwing them into the bottom. My daughter calls it the giant Jenga. It's not pretty but it is effective.

 

If you don't have the scrap sitting around it shouldn't cost you more than $25.00 for the lumber at Lowe's.

 

stand1.jpg

 

stand2.jpg

Adlai

Klatu Baratta Necktie!

 

Macabee Knives

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I did a similar sort of block, but found it "squishy". When I moved a couple of years ago, I found a chunk of gluelam beam on the property. It's about 5x24. I cut it into three pieces 22 inches long, drilled holes in the corners and ran some allthread through them. That and some construction adhesive and I've got a bock that weighs about 200 lbs. With 200lbs of anvil on top it's a pretty good platform :lol: .

 

geoff

"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

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I was at a loss to find a stump myself. I ended up using some pressure treated 4x4's on end held together with Liquid Nails and threaded rod going both directions. I think I ended up with a 200lb anvil and a 150lb block. Using them on end kept everything from being "squishy". The turnbuckle lets me really tighten everything down and keep everything in place.

 

 

anvil_2.jpg

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I have 2 anvils in the shop, first one was secured to a tree stump and the second to treated lumber standing upright. the upright lumber stand is far more stable than the tree stump. I have not changed the first one because I'm lazy and the anvil is 200#, but if I do, it will be placed on upright treated lumber. It is not that expensive and it sure makes a great base for the lighter anvils(less than 300#)----just my .02 worth of advice. :D

 

Peter

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Yup, end grain is the way to go. I use a pair of 8x12" railroad bridge timbers bolted and glued together on end. You will also want to take that rubber mat out from under the stand. All it does is make you work harder! :o Bolt the whole thing to the floor, you'll be surprised how much more work you'll get done per heat. Then switch to end grain treated wood and be blown away. B) If anvil ring is a factor, bolt down the anvil as tight as you can. If you feel you must, lay a bead of 100% silicone caulk under the anvil before you bolt it down. Plain old bolting works fine, though, and it makes the anvil/stump unit respond like a single object. The tighter the bolts, the quieter and more lively the anvil.

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Gentlemen,

 

I realized how important bolting the anvil to the stump after having a forging session with a friend. We made a flatbar out of a thick W2 roundbar, and boy, this was not easy because the anvil was moving in different places! Also, it was absorbing most of the energy from the blows.

Attached is my anvil/tree stump set-up. I have an idea of how to bolt down the anvil on the stump. Problem is I don't know how to bolt the stump on the concrete floor. My shop is built atop our house sewerage, so I surely cannot punch a hole through it. Anyway, what do you mean by "treated lumber standing upright" and "end grain"? Thanks!

myAnvilstump.jpg

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That ordinary stump will work just fine, use it as it is. :) The built-up "stumps" we are talking about are because it is often difficult to find a nice solid stump like yours in many places in the U.S. for some reason. By "End Grain" I mean the lumber, if that's what one chooses to use, should be stacked with the grain running up-and-down rather than sideways, as it will not compress as much that way. Finally, for your floor, construction adhesive such as "Liquid Nails" can work if the wood is dry.

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Thanks for all the advice. I have had pretty good luck so far with the stand the way it is. I may change it later but at this point I'm a lot more happier with it than the old stump. Plus it's the right height.

Allan, Bolting the stump to the floor would be a great idea but part of the deal with my wife is that everything has to be portable so she can get her car in the garage. I'm thinking of mounting wheels on the side so I can tilt it and dolly it around.

Adlai

Klatu Baratta Necktie!

 

Macabee Knives

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Alan,

Ain't the truth or at least that's what we tell 'em. :rolleyes:

 

JD,

I got the rubber mat from Harbor Freight It came with 4 pieces that can be put together. and yes it keeps the stand from bouncing around as well as leveling it out a bit. I keep one in front of my grinder to stand on and another under the anvil. It does burn well when orange steel falls out of the forge on it but it goes out right away too.

Adlai

Klatu Baratta Necktie!

 

Macabee Knives

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If you can ever get a round butt cut for a base they can be barrel rolled real easy. My anvil and base is close to 300 Lbs and all I have to do to move it is tilt it on edge and roll it. There is enough forge scale on my shop floor that as of late I can actually slide it around now. :blink: If I ever swept the wood floor it would lose it's fire resistant properties (right??).

Edited by B Finnigan

Everything I need to know I learned from the people trapped in my basement.

 

 

I'm out of my mind but feel free to leave a message.

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I live just a 1/4 mile from active logging roads so I can drive up one and take my pick. I would ship you one but it would be a little spendy. And you would still have to shave it until it was level.

Everything I need to know I learned from the people trapped in my basement.

 

 

I'm out of my mind but feel free to leave a message.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I found out one real good reason to bolt an anvil down to the stand when I had to dodge a falling 110# chunk of steel. It hit nothing but dirt so it wasn't damaged. Shortly after I found a section of tree trunk laying on the side of the road where I had a place to pull over and pick it up. Must be a couple of other smiths around here that I don't know about because sections of that tree trunk kept dissapearing over the next few days. I secured the anvil to the trunk section by going down to the hardware store and getting a two foot length of galvanized chain and four of the largest spikes that they had. I cut the chain in half and layed a section over each foot, stuck a spike through each end and drove them into the trunk as tight as I could get them. I have noticed that having the anvil on wood instead of the concrete end caps that it was on has quieted it down a good bit too.

 

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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Per a suggestion from Randal Graham, I've set my anvil on the stump with construction adhesive. Almost two years later, it appears to still be stuck down tight. It quieted the ring down significantly, as well.

 

Would it also work to secure the stump to the cement slab in the same manner? I suppose that I should just give it a shot, won't hurt anything if it doesn't work.

 

Josh

Edited by josh powell
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