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Langseax/long seax


Sam Salvati

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Here is a seax I just forged out, just the outline no bevels yet. The client's specs were 4 inch handle 20 inch blade, but I put 5 inches of handle and will probably end up with about 19-20-21 inch blade when it is done. It feels great in the hand already, I go alot by feel. Sorry about the last picture, it looks shorter than it is due to the angle.

Mike__s_seax_1.JPG

Mike__s_seax_2.JPG

Mike__s_seax_3.JPG

Edited by Sam Salvati

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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Sorry the steel is 5160.

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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That's a great looking knife. A large seax is one of the future projects that I'm thinking of. What is the width and thickness of the blade? Are you putting much of a taper in it? I'm sort of torn between putting a curve in the handle, like a sketch of one I saw in one of Oakeshott's book, and leaving the tang straight and using a moose leg bone for the handle. Might have to do it both ways. The things we have to do to learn this art. What can you say!? :rolleyes:

 

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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Looks good thus far.

 

Although Historic Seax's had curved banana shaped handles. are you going to forge the hande to that shape or is that what your leavin it at??

I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness,

nor the warrior for his glory. I love only that which they defend"

J.R.R. Tolkien

 

 

www.CedarloreForge.com

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It is hard to see, but it has a little bit of down curve to it already, which I will probably leave as is, though I might also forge the tail end of the tang into a more fishtail shape. Got a picture of a banana shaped handle? I'll have some more detailed specs tommorrow, now it's ate and I have a demo to do tommorrow at a caboose.

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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Looking good Sam.

 

David,

Not all of the seaxes had curved handles that's more of a migration era style. Both are acceptable.

 

 

Ditto and good point! Also, when I hear "langseax" I think of the Norwegian sword-hilted seax of about 30-36 inches length, but that may just be me. Looking good, regardless! B)

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Thanks guys! it will have a nice distal taper to it. It will be wider and longer than it is now, from forgng in the bevels and stuff, but will look pretty good hopefully when it is done. It will have the forged in ridgeline, and just a bit of refinement here and there. I was really not a fan of the seax shape, but it is growing on me more and more, i look forward to maybe trying to forge a complete long sword in the same shape.

Edited by Sam Salvati

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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  • 3 weeks later...

Here is the progress. Finshed hammering in the bevels, and refined the edge geometry a bit with the grinder, the lower shiny edge bevel will be either polished, scale pock marked, or rustily (NEW WORD!) aged.

Mike__s_seax_4.JPG

Mike__s_seax_5.JPG

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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Sam, thats freakin sweet my friend!! I take back what I said about makin the handle curved. It looks great as is!! :)

 

and I LOVE your makers symbol! that looks so sweet, its simple & elegant

 

I really like the clean flat yet aged black texture on the back spine of the Blade!! If I were you, I would maybe keeping a little bit of that black still visible in the finished piece while still bring the bevelled edge back a bit more. It would keep its ancient histpric feel that i think it really evokes now.

 

and as always I envy your hammer control. youve learned how to forge steel clean without over use on the grinder... makes me feel like a cheater when I shape 20% of a blade on the belt grinder... lol

 

But yeah great work!

 

I cant wait to see the handle on it!!!

I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness,

nor the warrior for his glory. I love only that which they defend"

J.R.R. Tolkien

 

 

www.CedarloreForge.com

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Thanks David! Honestly, I get alot of inspiration and confidence from makers like you and your friends. Sometimes I get to thinking "yah know, maybe I should just go over to the completely shiny side, and give up hammer finish for awhile, maybe even start trying some stock removal only peices", but with guys like you making such awesome blades, not all shinied up i really feel a kindred spirit of creativity. I would move the shiny bevel back, but then it would start to ubscure the forged in bevel, which I would like to keep. I forged the stamp for my maker's mark AWHILE ago, in fact it was one of the very first things I ever forged, not knowing that I would find it years later and finally heat treat it and use it. It is made from coil spring too! I will explain a bit as to what my symbol means. My business name is RIver Valley forge, both cause I have lived no more than 10 minutes away from the Delaware river my entire life, but also because my shop is located 100 yards away form the Delaware also, in the Delaware River Valley(hence River Valley Forge). My name is Sam Salvati, so the two stylised Ss are for my name, and for my business in that they look like 2 bends in the river, hich is very bendy around here.

 

Hammer work comes in time, never stop practicing, never give up, it will come. I would think the hammer control came partly out of necessity, I don;t have a grinder(other than my angle grinder, and I NEVER have enough pads) so to make blades with an edge bevel I had to learn to forge them in. Don;t feel like a cheater hehe, if I had a grinder(soon Bader, SOON!!!!!!!) I would use it, though I would still forge close to finished product as possible.

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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I would love to do some BOG OAK on this one, Anyone got a block they would like to sell trade?

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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  • 4 weeks later...

Here is some shots, blades been heat treated and drilled, and is getting Amboyna burl very soon. Going to do a leather sheath as well.

Mike__s_seax_8.JPG

Mike__s_seax_9.JPG

Mike__s_seax_10.JPG

Edited by Sam Salvati

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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Here is some shots of the handles pinned and setup for glue.

Mike__s_seax_11.JPG

Mike__s_seax_12.JPG

Mike__s_seax_13.JPG

Edited by Sam Salvati

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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Here she is all handled up. All that is left is the final polish and sharpening after the sheath is made. Handle is light brown syed Amboyna Burl, sealed with clear lacquer (which I am thinking of doing a couple more coats to give it that DEEP look). Pins are brass. I LOVE the brass against the what-i-thought-was-gonna-be-brown but is red, along with the hammer finish and high polish edge, both much cooler in person. ENJOY. COmments and critique VERY welcome!

Mike__s_seax_16.JPG

Mike__s_seax_17.JPG

Mike__s_seax_15.JPG

Mike__s_seax_20.JPG

Edited by Sam Salvati

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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Ah Sam that is so great!!! :)

 

you should be proud man, any viking warrior would be proud to wear that at his side. :)

 

You really got a great ancient feel to it which I love!!

 

leaving the slight pitting grain on the back spine makes it look rustic, and the handle woods stain color is Awesome!!!

 

I think that shade of red looks WAY better than just plain old brown would have looked.

 

 

over all amazing work man, you've got me inspired now! ;)

 

 

keep at it

I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness,

nor the warrior for his glory. I love only that which they defend"

J.R.R. Tolkien

 

 

www.CedarloreForge.com

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Thanks guys, i really appreciate the comments. Here is some shots of the scabbard, i would liek to thanks my teacher John for teaching me JUST how to do it.

Mike__s_seax_22.JPG

Mike__s_seax_23.JPG

Mike__s_seax_24.JPG

Mike__s_seax_25.JPG

Mike__s_seax_26.JPG

Edited by Sam Salvati

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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Very nice Sam. Makes a fellow want to go out and hack something down! I like the way the lines of the handle follow the arc of the spine but, the edge is straight. The juxtaposition makes the blade look less static, like its always in motion.

“All work is empty save when there is love, for work is love made visible.” Kahlil Gibran

"It is easier to fight for one's principles than to live up to them." - Alfred Adler

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Thank you guys, i am also very excited to finally see some peices getting completed.

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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I'm a fan! This is a guy to watch. One of the next generation of smiths that will break new ground.

I'm very impressed with your hammer finish Sam. Your ridgework is getting better every time I see your new work.

I really like your maker's mark design too.

Edited by Tim Lively

He who searches the hearts knows what the mind of the Spirit is.

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Impressive! the package seax/scabbard is very well. I love the contrast whith brut de forge, the aspect is ancient. Today I have forged also a small seax (30cm blade), I hope I come well like yours :rolleyes:

 

CIAO

 

Marco

CIAO FROM ITALY

 

Marco Di Francesco

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