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Unholy Love Child


Walter Sorrells

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I forged this wak a while back and only recently got around to finishing the polish. There's still a little clean-up work to do on the kissaki, but it's basically finished.

 

It's kind of a bastard love child of the Nambokucho and early Edo period. The extremely mild curvature is similar to Keicho Shinto type blades, but it's got the width, minimal taper and imposing kissaki of the Nambokucho period.

 

The blade length is 20". It's forged from about 2,000 to 3,000 layers of W2 and 1095. Because W2 and 1095 are so similar, the pattern doesn't exactly hit you in the face. The habaki is sterling silver.

 

Incidently, for anybody who's looked at Jesus's shobu blade, I've got a katana in the works that includes some tamahagane from the same smelt. Might make a fun compare-and-contrast exercise. (Or -- now that I think about it, maybe my blade comes from a later smelt we did together. Never mind...)

 

This blade's for sale, by the way.

 

w2_1095_wak_ura.jpg

 

hamon_and_hada.jpg

 

hada_close_up_w2_1095_wak.jpg

 

wak_kissaki.jpg

Check out Walter's instructional videos:

Forging Japanese Style Blades

Making Hamons

Japanese Sword Mounting

Polishing

Making Japanese Sword Fittings

www.waltersorrellsblades.com
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Walter I have to say that this blade is a beautiful blade the activity in the hammon is quite breath taking. I wish I could get the nerve to waste some steel and forge myself a Wak or a katana.

 

One of these days you need to do another video of you forging a Japanese style blade, just like the hammon one. And if my memory serves me you were talking about a polishing vid at some point?

 

Once again the blade is outstanding.

John W Smith
www.smith-forge.org

Fire and wind come from the sky, from the gods of the sky. But Crom is your god, Crom and he lives in the earth. Once, giants lived in the Earth, Conan. And in the darkness of chaos, they fooled Crom, and they took from him the enigma of steel. Crom was angered. And the Earth shook. Fire and wind struck down these giants, and they threw their bodies into the waters, but in their rage, the gods forgot the secret of steel and left it on the battlefield. We who found it are just men. Not gods. Not giants. Just men. The secret of steel has always carried with it a mystery. You must learn its riddle, Conan. You must learn its discipline. For no one - no one in this world can you trust. Not men, not women, not beasts.

[Points to sword]

This you can trust

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Darn lovely piece, Walter.

Every time you show something I do know it´s gonna be outstanding, even before I see it. And you never disappointed me :-)

 

Whish my hamons were that lively. Love the speckles on the spine of the blade.

 

Great work!

 

Mat

www.mareschmesser.de

 

Knifemaker, Germany

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I know that polishing video is in the making from my last visit with Walter.

 

I am too looking forward to see what the katana made from your batch of tamahagane comes out like. I can't keep track of what batch the steel came from though.

 

I like the subtle contrast in the steel with the W2/1095 combo.

Enjoy life!

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I think the subtle combination of the two similar steels is perfect! Really nice blade, I like the long kissaki and the width too.

Guy Thomas

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Walter I have to say that this blade is a beautiful blade the activity in the hammon is quite breath taking. I wish I could get the nerve to waste some steel and forge myself a Wak or a katana.

 

One of these days you need to do another video of you forging a Japanese style blade, just like the hammon one. And if my memory serves me you were talking about a polishing vid at some point?

 

 

Thanks, John.

 

Yeah, I'm finishing up the polishing video right now. Then the next one I'll do will be about forging Japanese style blades. I'm gonna shoot that one in Hi-Def and try to push the production quality as high as I can. I'll show the making of three example blades. The first will be a stock removal tanto as a kind of intro for somebody who's never made a knife before. The second will be a forged blade with a super minimalist set-up so that somebody who's just getting their feet wet with forging can do it. Then the third will be a shinogi-zukuri katana forged and heat treated the way I actually do it.

 

Walter

Check out Walter's instructional videos:

Forging Japanese Style Blades

Making Hamons

Japanese Sword Mounting

Polishing

Making Japanese Sword Fittings

www.waltersorrellsblades.com
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Wow Walter that is really nice and as everyone else said the low contrast is a neat effect. I wouldn't have thought of going that way since it seems that most people want to see that pattern stand way our. It really works and really adds to the elegance of the blade.

Adlai

Klatu Baratta Necktie!

 

Macabee Knives

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A beauty as usual Walter :D

 

He he, I can see that the hitatsura virus has been sweeping Atlanta to a larger or a lesser degree :D

Lovely. Is this the one going to a Pond of Gold or is it another one?

Antonio

 

BLADESIGN

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A beauty as usual Walter :D

 

He he, I can see that the hitatsura virus has been sweeping Atlanta to a larger or a lesser degree :D

Lovely. Is this the one going to a Pond of Gold or is it another one?

 

This was originally intended for Paul, but the sori didn't quite match the daito, so I figured I'd take another stab at it. No pun intended.

Check out Walter's instructional videos:

Forging Japanese Style Blades

Making Hamons

Japanese Sword Mounting

Polishing

Making Japanese Sword Fittings

www.waltersorrellsblades.com
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Walter, allow ma a question -

 

Did you quench her in water, oil, or both? Because the blade doesn´t seem to have curved while quenching?

 

Thanks in advance

 

Mat

www.mareschmesser.de

 

Knifemaker, Germany

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Walter, allow ma a question -

 

Did you quench her in water, oil, or both? Because the blade doesn´t seem to have curved while quenching?

 

Thanks in advance

 

Mat

 

Good question, Mat. As it happens, the lack of curvature had more to do with the way I laid on the clay. If you put on a very, very thin layer of clay -- along with the right temps, etc. -- you'll get utsuri. But when the clay is really thin, it also doesn't curve much, as happened here. I quenched it in water, followed by oil. If you quench it that way I normally do (four seconds or so in water, then into the hot oil), you'll usually get curvature -- assuming you lay the clay on normally (roughly 2 mm thick). But when I lay the clay on the way I did here (probably under 1 mm), you don't get much curve.

 

Walter

Check out Walter's instructional videos:

Forging Japanese Style Blades

Making Hamons

Japanese Sword Mounting

Polishing

Making Japanese Sword Fittings

www.waltersorrellsblades.com
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a striking blade!!

am I just completly insane or is thire a "hang 5" foot on the side from the claying??????(2ed pic from the top left side)

isnt welding simular metal more difficult than say a 1080 and a 1040??

in any case , a beautiful blade

Member:

Cal Knives

Practioner:

Suio Ryu Iai Kenpo

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