Jump to content

anvil choice


norsk

Recommended Posts

hi.

I plan on buying a new anvil,since I can`t seem to find a good used one.

never tried forging before so I have no idea which one to choose allthough I guess any anvil will be better than nothing.

could someone explain to me which of these I should choose,or not,and why?

http://www.kohlswagjuteri.se/brancher-smid...cher-smidesstad

sorry if this has been up before,but I haven`t found any threads with my limited searching skills.

I haven`t gotten around to ordering any forging books yet,so if this is explained in any book,please tell me which one(S).

 

thanks in advance

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Where are you at Norsk? The best advice I can give is to find other blacksmiths in your area, see what they have and question them about what they like and why. Hell, they probably will let you give it a try! Here in the states, in case you are not stateside, we have an organization, The Artist Blacksmiths Association of North America (ABANA), which has local chapters. Most of the members are anxious to help out any of the new folks and their membership rates are quite resonable. Oftentimes, joining will open up doors for the acquisition of used equipment and, usually, at very good rates. Blacksmiths often would rather see the equipment go to someone who will use it than make the maximum amount of money.

 

I like the Kohlswa Type B31. I really like double bick anvils, they have a very long flat face that is quite useful for checking flatness on long blades. To me they are the most versatile to use but, it is all a matter of individual preference and work style.

“All work is empty save when there is love, for work is love made visible.” Kahlil Gibran

"It is easier to fight for one's principles than to live up to them." - Alfred Adler

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It would be nice to know where you're at so that we won't be suggestiing a supplier half way around the world to you. It would also be nice to know what type of forging that you want to do. Realize that reguardless of what type of anvil you start out with, you may want to replace it later as your skills develope and you know more about how you want to work. Horns, also sometimes called bicks, are not essential but I do find mine coming in handy fairly frequently. Blacksmithing anvils are probably better for knife making that farrier anvils. The former general having smaller horns and thicker waists. My first anvil was 30 kilo/66 lb and I did pretty well with it but I got a 110lb/50 kilo anvil later. It was a cut rate Ebay special that I had to finish the face on but it does ok. What ever you get put it on a good base and chain/bolt/spike it down. Dodging a falling anvil isn't fun, and if it should hit you, it could do a lot more than ruining the day for you.

 

Before I forget it, get one or two good books on forging knives and possibly one on general blacksmithing and study them before you buy any equiptment. Post back here and ask questions, we're always glad to help. Doing that may help you reduce the number of mistakes that you make.

 

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

sorry guys,I thought I had put my location in my profile.I live in sweden.

I want to try forging some knives,and I if can manage to do that maybe some bigger blades in the future.

I have asked around but nobody knows any blacksmiths around here.I`m pretty sure there are some around here,I just need to find them.

and I`m gonna buy the books by hrisoulas,the craft of the japanese sword,and the art of blacksmithing.that should give me something to read I hope.

I have read a lot here,and tutos wherever I could find them.

I thought about starting with stock removal,since I thought I`d need the same grinder and equipment.but after looking at some peoples equipment on the net,it seems that at least a few people get by with stones,files etc.

and it seems you have more possibilities and options with forging and leaves you less dependent on special size steel supplies and so on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jim Hrisoulas' books are great, especially if you want to get into sword making, but from personal experience, start with small knives. They're easier to keep straight and generally finish faster. I think that you made a good decision to hold off on major power equiptment for right now. Many of us do use file, stones, and even make do by putting grinding belts on wood working belt sanders. Remember power equiptment doesn't impart skill to the user. They make it easier and faster to do your work. One of the things that it will make faster is ruining a piece of work. From my experience, it's better to start slow and develope the skill and know how to progress from a bar of steel and a block of wood and develope them into a finished knife. But that's just my newbie opinion. One other piece of advice, don't be afraid of your mistakes, use them.

 

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hope there is some useful information in the hrisoulas books for making knives as well.I`ll buy it even if it isn`t but then I will put it further down on the list.

good to hear people make blades and other things without to much power equipment.that`s what I plan to do,to find out if I can make anything useful,and to see if I actually like this stuff. I have wanted to try it for a long time,but you never know.

I have several other books by the way,boye,loveless,centofante,terzuola so I`ve done some reading.useful info even for someone who wants to forge.at least I think so,guess I will find out later.

have shaped some blades with files and so on,but I didn`t finish them.I don`t think the steel I used could be hardened properly.I have made one knife with files,hacksaw and hardened it with an oxy/acetylene burner.it cracked the first time so it became a lot smaller than intended but it`s hard and cuts.

really appreciate the help guys

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kohlswa is a good anvil, you won't go wrong with one. In Sweden they ought to be cheaper than most of your other new-anvil choices as well. Tell them they need to start exporting to the USA again!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don`t know if they`re cheaper here but if they are I feel sorry for you.I got the price list today and it isn`t what I would call cheap.

on the other hand,few things we spend money on will last as long I guess.

and if it is cheaper that`s one of the few things that are.

I swage bullets and needed some lead wire in a special size,it was less than half the price to order it from the u.s. including shipping and tax.and that`s just one example.

good to hear it`s a good brand.I`ve found some used ones on the net.if they`re good then maybe that`s the way to go to begin with.

and my neighbour says he should be able to get me a used one for free,but I`ll believe it when I see it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you happen to be able to read Norwegian (by your alias I recon you do) I would recommend "Knivsmeden" and " Kunsten å smi" by Håvard Bergland. They are very good books for the beginner knifemaker and blacksmith, I'm not sure if they are available in English, but I know that they have been translated to German.

A very proud Say-Mak owner :D

 

My YouTube channel

 

www.leifern.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have you thought of something other than a traditional anvil shaped anvil to start with? All you really have to have is something that can withstand the heat and hammer blows, of course the heavier the better. A large chunk of steel or iron (or even some rocks) will let you start while you look around for a proper anvil.

The hrisoulas books (at least the first two) are good choices. For general forging "A Blacksmithing Primer" by McDaniel (i think) and "New Edge of the Anvil" by Andrews are good.

If you're interested in doing the heat treat of the blades yourself i'd recommend a basic metalurgy book as well. I use "Metallurgy Theory and Practice" by Allen.

 

Expensive equipment isn't necessary to turn out a useable knife (or with experience a good looking one). My power tools have largely been a drill and grinding wheel and I've made useable slipjoint knives. Currently I have a drill press and saws (for handle material) but my primary shaping and finishing is still done mostly by hand. I have pictures on my website of some of my work including my first knife and latest so you can see the difference a couple dozen completed knives makes.

 

ron

Having watched government for some time, it has become obvious that our government is no longer for the people. If the current trend continues, it won't be long untill armed rebellion is required.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Norsk, you seem to have a pretty good understanding of English, and if you have a way of playing American formatted DVD's, go to Hoods Woods at www.survival.com and order their Woodsmaster volume #9. It deals with primative knife making. You will be able to see what can be done without a lot of power equiptment or a factory made anvil. You might also Google (or whatever the heck you do in Sweden) for Tai Goo Knives. He's one of the knifesmiths on the DVD and he uses almost no power equiptment. Even his "primative" knives are an absolute work of art. Don't let the name fool, the lad's all American and looks and talks like he's a Tennessee ridge runner. That's probably something like a Swedish ridge runner, except our mountains in that part of the country are a little lower and a little greener than yours :lol: .

 

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can read norwegian leif,thats where I`m from,so I`m gonna add those to my list as well.

and the other books and movies are also added to my shopping list.I have checked out tai goo´s webpage quite a few times before,but that was a while ago,I will go back and check it again.

again,thank you for your help gentlemen.

I`ve yet to see a smith/knife/swordmaker keeping anything secret or not helping out beginners like myself.I`ve read a lot of reasons why,but it still amases me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

well, from my experience i've found that anvils with a step or even no horn at all are the best for forging blades. they give you a nice edge to work from and still allow you to easily hold your piece without having the horn in the way. i have a nice big flat double horned anvil but I find it hard to make a good bevil on so i generally use a steped or hornless anvil for bevils. and keep the big lad for other smithing. i'd say having a good work surface is probably the most important feature. i've seen pics of african smiths who only work on a scavanged peice of rail track imbeded in a log and make some truely amazing work.you may want to see what you can scavange or get cheap before you invest in a new one. for starters you will get a taste for what you are looking for and secondly you may find that you just don't like forging.(blasphamy sorry all) but if you are serous the bigger is generally better. hope this is usefull to you cheers jeff

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...