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Steven Sharpe

Refractory coating

7 posts in this topic

Hi everyone !

i use a simple forge made-up of hard firebricks. I use it with a 3/4" propane burner which works wonderfully for general forging (too chicken to try welding in it yet ! :lol: )

BrickForge1.jpg

VenturiBurner1.jpg

 

Anyway, I was wondering if any refractory coating on the bricks could be used to help in keeping the heat more efficiently inside the forge ? I know most of the coatings are used on kaowool or durablanket but is there any other product that could be used directly on bricks ?

 

Thanks for looking guys !

 

Steven Sharpe

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ITC 100 can be used on bricks to some affect, but I wouldn't bother I bought some and it comes off after a while and really doesn't save you that much or increase the heat much. IMHO

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What would serve you better than a coating woud be to use soft insulating bricks, instead of the hard ones. The hard brick will take a great deal of heat and considerable borax, but they conduct heat wellk enough to literally "suck the heat out through them" and radiate it into the surrounding area. You could also wrap the whole works with kaowool or something similar, but it is a very large thermal mass, and will take some time to get up to heat.

 

I like castable refractories, myself. Use a thin shell of hard, hot face inside for the combustion chamber, and a thicker (2x+) shell of insualting castable inside the sheet metal cover.

 

How'd you get the hole in a hard brick so nice ?

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Here's a suggestion. Take out the lower fire brick and get some refractory cement and trowel it into the fire chamber to round out the corners. This could give you some addition swirling of the fire an cut down on any hot spots. I did something like that on a forge that I made from a mail box. I used Mizzoue from Ellis Custom Knifeworks. Darrell has another refractory cement that is supposed to be more insulating than Mizzoue but he only sells it in 55lb bags, at least he did the last time that I looked. I used 3" of Inswool to line my forge, which is supposed to really soak up the heat but, at least with the Mizzoue lining, it comes up to heat quickly and I can just barely get it up to welding heat with a venturi burner even though the fire box is 18" deep.

 

It doesn't show one way or the other in your picture, but if you don't have a back door to you're forge you might want to consider it. It just needs to be large enough to allow a bar of steel to pass through. Eventually you will be wanting to forge a longer blade than that forge will allow.

 

Doug Lester

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Thanks everyone for taking a look at it !

 

How'd you get the hole in a hard brick so nice ?

 

Hi Howard, The first thing i tried to drill those was a makeshift drill bit made from an old pipe and welded a shaft

to get it to fit in a very cheap drill, Well the drill died halfway through. After many attempt i decided to use my pneumatic drill with a SDS bit of 1/4" inch size and made multiple holes (removal of material) around the perimeter that i needed. Then i gently took a old scrap flat screwdriver and used it gently as a chisel. Finally got through - i used an old round file to finish forming the hole (it worked after all). Now i know why they call those HARD firebricks ... :D

 

Steven Sharpe

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It doesn't show one way or the other in your picture, but if you don't have a back door to you're forge you might want to consider it. It just needs to be large enough to allow a bar of steel to pass through. Eventually you will be wanting to forge a longer blade than that forge will allow.

 

Hi Doug ! yes indeed the back of my forge is opened but when i usually forge with it i use a firebrick that i cut to the right size and made a removable door at the back ! i just leave a space big enough (about 1 inch wide) to get the bar to travel through the forge this way i can go bigger than the forge is and save fuel at the same time ! I use to have a charcoal forge but i live in the suburbs and city laws prohibits use of a charcoal fire not even an Hibachi BBQ !!! That is how i learned politicians and bureaucrats push pencils not hot steel :D

 

I will be moving my forge equipment to my friends house (shop) for the winter and i am thinking of making a new forge

out of an old propane tank with kaowool or similar (so i don't have to move this heavy one again)...

Thanks Doug !

 

Steven Sharpe

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I thought that some of the fire laws were strick aroung here. One of the neighboring cities states than one cannot have an open fire within 12 feet of a combustable surface, that's gass or charcoal. Too many people burning down appartment complexes by grilling on their balconies. Now if they could just prevent the idiots from throwing out hot charcoal into their plastic garbage cans.

 

Doug Lester

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