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Three Sisters Forge

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This is a kitchen knife made for a good friend. He lives on St. Johns. The first picture is the finished hamon, the second is the blade after it was left on a counter wet. The blade is 1095. I don't know if it can be fixed.

 

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Jim Allen

Three Sisters Forge

Bend, Oregon

 

http://www.threesistersforge.com

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Y'all are assuming a lot. how do you know it was not the wife or kids or neighbor that left wet?? Might not have been his friend at all. A little emory and elbow greas will bring it back. May have to put it back on a flat belt. If you did once you can do it agin.GRIN.

Good luck

 

chuck

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Well Jim it was a nice blade but some fresh grinding should be able to fix it up. Good luck and show us how it turns out.

Bob

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Y'all are assuming a lot. how do you know it was not the wife or kids or neighbor that left wet?? Might not have been his friend at all. A little emory and elbow greas will bring it back. May have to put it back on a flat belt. If you did once you can do it agin.GRIN.

Good luck

 

chuck

 

He is single, did the damage and waited a year to tell me he felt so bad. So I took a bright belt and blasted the rust off pretty quick. 3M makes these, If you have never used one they work great for this. I did not want to knock the handle off, so no Hamon with stones.

 

My mistake, I should have used 440C. I just returned the blade and included a new knife made with 440C also. This one was made in 1999, kind of cool to look it over. The balde was good shape, not great and the handle sucked. I felt bad to see this rusted up, but it good to self review.

Jim Allen

Three Sisters Forge

Bend, Oregon

 

http://www.threesistersforge.com

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You might take something like nitric acid or aqua regia and make it look the same all over. Then brush off all loose rust and apply tanic acid to give it a blue-black patina. Then post some pictures to show how it turned out. I've been wanting to try that technique for a while and I'm curious about how it would work :rolleyes: .

 

Just kindn'

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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You might take something like nitric acid or aqua regia and make it look the same all over. Then brush off all loose rust and apply tanic acid to give it a blue-black patina. Then post some pictures to show how it turned out. I've been wanting to try that technique for a while and I'm curious about how it would work :rolleyes: .

 

Just kindn'

Doug Lester

 

Sorry, blade just went out. Do you think this will work on my wife's cat?? Let's give it a go.

Jim Allen

Three Sisters Forge

Bend, Oregon

 

http://www.threesistersforge.com

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maybe concider 440C or maybe a 300 series stainless =X

thats a shame.............................

~M~

Member:

Cal Knives

Practioner:

Suio Ryu Iai Kenpo

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When I made this knife (1999) I was just starting to forge. Hamon was a complete mystery to me, I had never used clay. Heat treating was done with a torch and into a bucket of used oil from McDs. The blacksmith I shared the shop with suggested using vinegar to check where it had hardened. WOW, a hamon lived in there. Pretty much ruined my life, I have never stopped.

 

It was way cool to look over work that was 8 years past. The blade was pretty good, the handle and shape was terrible. I also should have used 440C.

 

The blade was restored, but no hamon.

Jim Allen

Three Sisters Forge

Bend, Oregon

 

http://www.threesistersforge.com

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Paul- Sounds like a fairly normal etch, just take all the scale off the surface of the steel and dunk in vinegar. After a while, the hardened steel's etched at a different rate to the softer stuff, so shows up as a colour difference.

I had a strange thought the other day.

If I were locked in a room with a copy of myself, i wouldn't like me very much.

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Paul- Sounds like a fairly normal etch, just take all the scale off the surface of the steel and dunk in vinegar. After a while, the hardened steel's etched at a different rate to the softer stuff, so shows up as a colour difference.

 

Paul,

 

Right on target. I was very new to diff heat treating, using just a torch, no clay. We also would use vinegar to remove forge scale. Drop the piece in and next morning scale was loose. The vinegar is just acetic acid, low normality. It will hit steel differently in soft/hard areas. I now use a small butane torch to heat, dab vinegar to look at hamons.

Edited by Three Sisters Forge

Jim Allen

Three Sisters Forge

Bend, Oregon

 

http://www.threesistersforge.com

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