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finished bowie


WES

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Hello all! I have enjoyed reading this forum for a long while now and only recently joined as a member! my computer skills are at a very early stage, so please forgive me during my learning peroid. I'm going to try showing a bowie I just finished for a customer, it was a long time in completing as for the last 17 years I was only spare time until recently going full time. The knife is full of mistakes that I now know how to do better, so in the future my work will be much improved, and with that I open myself to opinoin and critique.

 

http://s242.photobucket.com/albums/ff92/vi...mediafilter=all

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First off i would like to welcome you to the board! Now that i a fantastic piece of work in the style of Mr. Moran I like everything about it! Thanks for showing it to us and please show us more.

 

Bob

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Looks like you have had some past experience building flintlock longrifles as well, judging by the carving and degree of expertise on the wire inlay. Are you near Jud Brennan, by any chance?

 

If you consider this one to be full of mistakes, I can't wait to see what consider good! :ph34r:

 

Welcome aboard.

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very nice piece, I can only imagine the time and hard work it took creating this.

"One who is samurai must before all things" Keep constantly in mind, by day and by night. the fact that he has to die...

 

-Dai Doji Yuzon-

16th Century

 

http://sites.google.com/site/canadianliveblade/home

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Looks like you have had some past experience building flintlock longrifles as well, judging by the carving and degree of expertise on the wire inlay. Are you near Jud Brennan, by any chance?

 

If you consider this one to be full of mistakes, I can't wait to see what consider good! :ph34r:

 

Welcome aboard.

 

 

I personaly have never built a flinter before but I'm getting ready to build a 62cal fullstock flinter from scratch with the help and guidance of friend back in wyoming who does it for a living. He is also the one who taught me the basic's of silver wiring.

I've never had the pleasure of meeting Jud Brennan as of yet. I've seen the turn off to his place along the highway on my way to moose hunting but was pressed for time. I live on an island off the coast of the Alaskan mainland( about an hours plane ride) we have bears here that get up to 1500pds and square off at ten ft and better, and that's what the 62 flinter is for. Thanks for the comment's, Wes

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Wow that looks great.

 

What method do you use to finish the wood?

 

 

James, after the carving and inlay is complete, everything is sanded too a 240grit only therefore leaving the pores fully open to accept the stain and sealer. I generally stain darker than I want the finish to look when done because all the steps that follow will remove and lighten the color as you go. after staining, I apply at least two coats of permalyn sealer and let each coat dry fully before finally sanding to 340 and 400grits. after which I start applying the finish in light coats to fill in the pores, sanding between each coat, until the finish is biult up to the surface of the wood. This is a real tedioius task on a piece that has relief carving! I usually put one or two coats of finish more and let dry completly before buffing with a soft cotton cloth, my preffered finish is linspeed by the way.

 

PS; forgot to mention that you must never forget to whisker the wood before applying the sealer coats!

 

Wes

Edited by WES
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Hello all! I have enjoyed reading this forum for a long while now and only recently joined as a member! my computer skills are at a very early stage, so please forgive me during my learning period. I'm going to try showing a bowie I just finished for a customer, it was a long time in completing as for the last 17 years I was only spare time until recently going full time. The knife is full of mistakes that I now know how to do better, so in the future my work will be much improved, and with that I open myself to opinion and critique.

 

http://s242.photobucket.com/albums/ff92/vi...mediafilter=all

 

 

I am a firm believer that you are your worst critic.

 

That knife is beautiful.

Chris

 

Live life like its your last day.

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James, after the carving and inlay is complete, everything is sanded too a 240grit only therefore leaving the pores fully open to accept the stain and sealer. I generally stain darker than I want the finish to look when done because all the steps that follow will remove and lighten the color as you go. after staining, I apply at least two coats of permalyn sealer and let each coat dry fully before finally sanding to 340 and 400grits. after which I start applying the finish in light coats to fill in the pores, sanding between each coat, until the finish is biult up to the surface of the wood. This is a real tedioius task on a piece that has relief carving! I usually put one or two coats of finish more and let dry completly before buffing with a soft cotton cloth, my preffered finish is linspeed by the way.

 

PS; forgot to mention that you must never forget to whisker the wood before applying the sealer coats!

 

Wes

 

Thanks for the tips!

Your hard work really shows in the finish. I guess hard work is the only way to get such a nice finish. Do you ever have a problem with the wood being softer than the silver so it is difficult to keep the surfaces level?

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WES WHIPPLE--I presume. Welcome to the board. Nice example in wire and carving along with an exceptional bowie. Sheath is just as nice.

 

congrats on a nice piece of work.

 

chuck bennett

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Thanks for the tips!

Your hard work really shows in the finish. I guess hard work is the only way to get such a nice finish. Do you ever have a problem with the wood being softer than the silver so it is difficult to keep the surfaces level?

 

 

At one time I did! Many years ago I became very selective about the wood I use for my handles. My two preferences are walnut and maple. When it comes to maple there are basically two kinds, hard and soft, the hard maple is sugar maple, often called rock maple, and it is the best for relief carving and wire inlaying as it's cells and fibers will stand up to being cut and severed without the surrounding cells being crushed. soft maple, while often being very figured and curly at times is good for handles without any decorations. It can take a little practice to tell the difference between the two but if you have both kinds on hand you will note that sugar maple is noticabley heavier and somewhat harder to indent with your thumbnail. When I flush the surface after inlaying I dab a drop of water on the wire and dry it with a blowdryer and it swells the wood up tight around the wire, then I file it off flush using a very fine swiss pillar file,then after all wiring is complete I fine sand everything smooth making sure to use a backing that is not to soft and sand in all directions and not just paralell to the wire, and don't try to dig in with the sanding paper yourself, let it do the cutting. sorry, I know this is long winded, and there could be so much more added. I get carried away! Hope this helps. Wes

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Hello all! I guess I should clarify what I feel are the mistakes that I mention on this bowie. I realize this is something that I probably should not do as themaker but I feel you are mostly all fellow makers and a family of sorts rather than the buying public so here goes; When I finished the handle decorations I felt that the handle might still appear a little bulbous in symmetry to the blade, also there a many places where my wire inlay could have blended into itself much much better, though some of these places did not become apparent until the final sanding step and by then it was too late. There are also a couple places around the relief carving that should have been cleaned up better. It took me a week and a half to shape, carve, and decorate that handle and sheath, and I guess I was a little burned out and should have let it sit for a few days and come back to it freshened up. I learned so much about inlaying from that piece and I have tons more idea's for future knives. since going full time in March though I have been swamped with regular orders. Wes

Edited by WES
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Hello all! I guess I should clarify what I feel are the mistakes that I mention on this bowie. I realize this is something that I probably should not do as themaker but I feel you are mostly all fellow makers and a family of sorts rather than the buying public so here goes; When I finished the handle decorations I felt that the handle might still appear a little bulbous in symmetry to the blade, also there a many places where my wire inlay could have blended into itself much much better, though some of these places did not become apparent until the final sanding step and by then it was too late. There are also a couple places around the relief carving that should have been cleaned up better. It took me a week and a half to shape, carve, and decorate that handle and sheath, and I guess I was a little burned out and should have let it sit for a few days and come back to it freshened up. I learned so much about inlaying from that piece and I have tons more idea's for future knives. since going full time in March though I have been swamped with regular orders. Wes

 

 

Ah, THOSE kinds of mistakes. ;) The ones you as maker see but nobody else does. I have a lot of those, along with the ones everybody else does see. :rolleyes:

 

I am not surprised you've been swamped since going full time.

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