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Adlai Stein

The Mastermyr Find

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I've been wanting to get this book for some time but never had the chance. I picked it up this weekend for about $18 from one of the vendors at Quad State and they had several copies. If you want to see what's in a Viking tool chest this book totally rocks. You can also look here for the drawings http://netlabs.net/~osan/Mastermyr/ but the book also contains lots of photographs too.

 

A while back I put it in my half.com wish list because they didn't have any copies today I got this message from them.

 

 

The Mastermyr Find: Gosta Berg, Greta Arwidsson (Paperback, 2000)

 

Best Price: $99.99

Condition: Very Good Seller: thslone

 

Best Condition: Very Good

Price: $238.85 Seller: bwibook

 

I about had a heart attack at their rediculous prices.

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Wow! It's a good book but not worth $100 I'd have had a heart attack if I got that email too.

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Wow , I think I paid $14.00 for my copy , apparently I should have purchased several ...

 

 

Jens

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Hello everyone...first post.

 

In school I used to use a site called www.Campusi.com that provided me an invaluable resource for cheaper priced books. I put in The Mastermyr Find on a title search and found quite a few prices (after shipping) ranging from $23 to $202. Hope that helps.

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These are a bit early but I took this pic at the Brittish Museum.

 

London07_577.jpg

 

The card below reads, "A selection of tools used by Blacksmiths Burried 50-100 AD found in Waltham Abbey, Essex.

Part of a large horde of tools including anvil tongs hammer chisel & poker. Many had been bent or broken before depositing."

 

London07_613.jpg

London07_614.jpg

 

London07_619.jpg

 

These are 700-1100. I did not get a readable picture of the card and deleted it.

Edited by Adlai Stein

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This PDF has an illustration of a find from Tjele, Jutland:

http://www.vitterhetsakad.se/fornvannen/pd...06_323_lund.pdf

 

Jeroen, I suspect this article would have more info/scaled drawings of the Bygland find, but I have not seen it, so no promises! ;)

Blindheim, C.: "Smedegraven fra Bygland i Morgedal".

VIKING XXVI, 1963 side 25-80.

(That’s Viking 26, as in VIKING. Tidsskrift for norrøn arkeologi)

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I located a copy of the Bygland paper, lots of drawings of spear socket decoration (the Bygland smith may have been a bladesmith B) ) and these:

bygland2s.jpg

(scalebar is 10cm, I think)

bygland3s.jpg

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I located a copy of the Bygland paper, lots of drawings of spear socket decoration (the Bygland smith may have been a bladesmith B) ) and these:

bygland2s.jpg

(scalebar is 10cm, I think)

bygland3s.jpg

Excellent, thanks! I've come across another gravefind including a smiths toolkit:

http://www.arkikon.no/baatgravside.htm

Edited by Jeroen Zuiderwijk

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Plate 8 from “Den Yngre Jernalders Svaerd” (A. Lorange, 1889) has an assortment of smithing tools: three hammers, two files, two anvils, a hot cut and a pair of tongs that have an interesting ‘keeper’ – one rein has a hinged bar with thirteen blind drillholes, the other a little tenon on the end. Looks like it would offer a wide range of clamping compared to the ones used by forgeshops today, and that’s ‘cause they probably didn’t routinely use twenty or thirty pairs of tongs in a Viking-age shop. ;)

lorange8s.jpg

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Plate 8 from “Den Yngre Jernalders Svaerd” (A. Lorange, 1889) has an assortment of smithing tools: three hammers, two files, two anvils, a hot cut and a pair of tongs that have an interesting ‘keeper’ – one rein has a hinged bar with thirteen blind drillholes, the other a little tenon on the end. Looks like it would offer a wide range of clamping compared to the ones used by forgeshops today, and that’s ‘cause they probably didn’t routinely use twenty or thirty pairs of tongs in a Viking-age shop. ;)

lorange8s.jpg

Cool! Thanks again :) Those tongs might come in handy with welding as well? You could clamp the pieces in the tongs to keep them located before the first weld. Dunno if that's practical though. And naturally it's also a great help when making torsion damast, though you'll need a second pair of tongs for that. I'm trying to get my head around all the tools I'm going to need to make various saxes and perhaps swords as well in the future.

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Those tongs might come in handy with welding as well? You could clamp the pieces in the tongs to keep them located before the first weld. Dunno if that's practical though.

 

Yes, in a charcoal or coke forge you have enough pin-point heat control so you could get one end of a bar hot enough for welding without overheating your tongs clamped to the other end; it would not be workable in a propane forge.

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