Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Steve R

Necking a tang w/o fullers?

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

 

All of the blades I've been working on have been off-centre, so I've been able to get away with drawing down the tang using the edge of my anvil until now. I'm currently working on a piece that I pretty much have to have the tang centred, but I don't currently have a spring or top/bottom fuller and am having a heck of a time getting the tang centred. I probably should have just tapered it down and ground the notches out, but in my effort to forge as much to shape as possible I started trying to fuller it using the edge of the anvil as usual, and now I don't know what to do. Help?

 

Thanks,

/steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Steve, I think I know what you're saying. If you have a shoulder that kind of looks like an L and you want it to look like a T, what you need to do is place the should with the L facing up on the corner of the anvil so that when you hammer down on the ricasso area, the tang just shifts into the center. You'll have to hit only the ricasso, hitting off of the anvil, creating a shearing force. It's really hard to explain in words. I hope that helps a little bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't use a fuller tool for the shoulders but am going to build something to make the job more efficient.... it can be a bit of a challenge to keep the tang centered sometimes, especially if you have a short attention span like me. That said, I find that working off the corner of the anvil works if you turn the tang over ever couple of whacks and hit the opposite side the same number of times. It does require a bit of care to make sure you hit on the tang and not in the ricasso area, but it ain't that big a deal. I just did a tang that a couple weeks back that I changed my mind on at the eleventh hour. I had it where it was an L shape with the tang spine being right in line with the blade spine... It was interesting to put it back in the center...

 

Yep, I am going to make myself something to make drawing those things down easier...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can use the horn of the anvil and the peen of your hammer in place of a spring swage or guillotine tool. It helps if you have a hammer with a large radius on the peen. As noted, it will help to keep things centered if you flip the piece frequently and hammer an equal number of strokes on each side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alrighty, I'll have to give those suggestions a try. Mostly I think I just need practice. I tried what Bob mentioned a couple of times, and it seems to be working at first but it ends up crooked. When I then try straightening it out, it ends up right back where I started. I did this 3 times in a row, and had to stop and laugh. What's the definition of insanity? Trying the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result each time! :huh:

 

Thanks for the replies folks. Try, try again...I'll get it one of these days.

 

cheers,

/steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have more than one pair of tongs, you can use the handle end of the second pair as a small double-sided fuller. They bend out of shape fairly quickly but aren't too hard to bend back. Don't forget to quench the handle end after such use, or you'll not be happy when you pick them up later and they're still hot :lol:

 

Michael

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You, sir, are a frickin' genius, and I am an idiot. That is a splendid idea that I expect will work for me just fine. I can't believe it didn't occur to me!

 

Thanks!

/steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...