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Verticle forges


Doug Lester

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Comments on the tread about insulation has gotten me thinking about verticle forges again. I have a horizontal gas forge and a charcoal forge. I like the charcoal forge because of it's flexability but one problem that I have is the smoke and odor that it puts out. I live in a townhouse complex and my neighbors don't appriciate, quite understandably, their laundry smelling like a cookout after they hang it on the line to dry. Twice reciently I lost a day of forging because neighbors had their laundry hanging out. I don't have that problem with gas but I don't like heating up more of the steel than I'm going to be working that heat. Would a verticle forge be an answere to my problem?

 

I have an old horizontal forge that is now nothing more than a stand for my current horizontal forge that I built out of a large mail box. The fire chamber is approximantly 5" round and 15" deep. The body is made of insulating brick and it is lined with Mizzoue refractory cement. My idea is to turn in on it's end and fill the bottom with refractory cement to seal the pass through opening and make the bottom a little thicker. I could cast a block of refractory to seal what would then be the top. I would then cut two holes opposite each other to stick the steel through and another for the burner near the bottom. Then I'll coat the outside with more cement. The reason for the latter is that I have to keep my forges outside and I found out through experience that if the insulating brick gets wet it must be dried out before the forge can be used again. Most of the heat will go to cooking off the water otherwise. Does it sound like a plan or is it back to the drawing board?

 

I will probably keep the charcoal forge because of it's ability to handle odd shaped pieces but a gas forge will probably work better for me as my main forge in the enviornment I work in.

 

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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Comments on the tread about insulation has gotten me thinking about verticle forges again. I have a horizontal gas forge and a charcoal forge. I like the charcoal forge because of it's flexability but one problem that I have is the smoke and odor that it puts out. I live in a townhouse complex and my neighbors don't appriciate, quite understandably, their laundry smelling like a cookout after they hang it on the line to dry. Twice reciently I lost a day of forging because neighbors had their laundry hanging out. I don't have that problem with gas but I don't like heating up more of the steel than I'm going to be working that heat. Would a verticle forge be an answere to my problem?

 

I have an old horizontal forge that is now nothing more than a stand for my current horizontal forge that I built out of a large mail box. The fire chamber is approximantly 5" round and 15" deep. The body is made of insulating brick and it is lined with Mizzoue refractory cement. My idea is to turn in on it's end and fill the bottom with refractory cement to seal the pass through opening and make the bottom a little thicker. I could cast a block of refractory to seal what would then be the top. I would then cut two holes opposite each other to stick the steel through and another for the burner near the bottom. Then I'll coat the outside with more cement. The reason for the latter is that I have to keep my forges outside and I found out through experience that if the insulating brick gets wet it must be dried out before the forge can be used again. Most of the heat will go to cooking off the water otherwise. Does it sound like a plan or is it back to the drawing board?

 

I will probably keep the charcoal forge because of it's ability to handle odd shaped pieces but a gas forge will probably work better for me as my main forge in the enviornment I work in.

 

Doug Lester

 

Doug,

 

first, the problem about smell could be solved using a chimney high enough to have the fumes vented away from your neighbours fresh stuff ...

 

but to your question about the gas forge..

basically, yes, a vertical forge, with a small diameter interior will of course only heat directly the part within the forge opening... I have found that for all but forgewelding for me a vertical forge is a much preferrable design... when it comes to forge-welding though, if I have to stick with gas, I prefer a horizontal forge, as it is easier to clean and maintain when flux causes problems...

anyways, these days I use mostyl coke or coal... I love the smell, the look of the fire the firing up in the beginning ...

 

daniel

FERRUM - Daniel Gentile

custom knives & forging classes

http://www.ferrum-d.com

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You loose some efficiency heating up all of that hard insulation. A hard floor is not a bad idea, if you are going to be welding in the forge, but if its just a blade forge, I'd do a kaowool floor and top plug. That is what I've done in mine. I don't weld in it ( I have a horizontal forge with a brick floor for welding) and I have never had a problem.

 

Just my .02,

 

Geoff

"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

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