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New Anvil Identification


Alan W.

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I bought an anvil last night for $200 and, though I think it will work, I am wondering what some experienced views would be.

 

It is 100# and (with the horn pointed away) has:

 

Left side top - TRENTON 99 CAST STEEL

Right Side Middle - Some type of Eagle imprint

Back Middle - 1880

Back Base - PATENT APR 24 1877

Front Base - FISHER

 

The top is smooth/straight and has a 3/4" hardie hole and 1/2" or so round hole. It looks a though there is a 1/2" plate on top of the main surface and a 3/4" deep different surface on the lower flat and horn. The body is fairly rough and rebound seems good.

 

I picked it up through "Bargain News" from a 78 year old who had inherited it from his uncle...I think it will work for me as I am just getting started but would like to know any background on it.

 

Any info would be a help...

 

Thanks!

Henry Fonda was still throwing up before each stage performance when he was seventy-five. Fear of failure doesn't go away.

 

The warrior and the artist live by the same code of necessity, which dictates that the battle must be fought anew every day.

 

- STEVEN PRESSFELD

The War of Art

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It sounds like you got yourself a good deal. 100 pounds is plenty to forge with, even though heavier is more effecient. Bill Moran used a 99 pound anvil that looked to me to be more of a ferier type. The cutting plate should be of a softer steel as should be the horn. Solutions for hardy tools is to 1) make them yourself or, 2) buy tools with a 1" or 7/8" shank and forge or grind them down. With good care that anvil may give you a lifetime of service.

 

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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Except for the "Trenton" mark, it sounds like a Fisher. I have a 200# which I love. Fishers usually have a tool steel plate welded to a cast body. They have good rebound, but very little ring, which I also like. If someone has a copy of Anvils in America they can look up the section on Fishers and see if they were ever marked Trenton as well.

 

On a Fisher the top of the horn and the step are also tool steel. I do wish that people would stop telling folks that the step is a "cutting table". It's not, it's an old blacksmith myth. Use a copper or brass plate to cut on, it'll save the surface of the anvil and the edge of your cutter. The step on mine is all chopped up and the heel has a big chunk knocked off by a welder arc, and I still think it's the best anvil I've worked on.

 

Sounds like you got a good deal at $2 a pound. I'm hoping to wake up one day and find that semi-mythical 1000# Fisher on my doorstep :rolleyes: .

 

Geoff

"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

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Sorry, Geoff, but that's what the illustration in my book has it labeled as, however (you notice how there always seems to be a "however") it also recommended a heavy sheet of brass to cut on. It'll save your cutting tools.

 

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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For 200 you got a good deal.

My life is like shaving with a razor sharp machete. It's a bit awkward and I feel a sting every now and then, but in the end I'm happy with the results.

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Yeah, I know that some of the books say that. It make me sad to see an anvil abused. I'm touchy about it 'cause I got chewed out in one of my first classes for doing what the book said, who knew?

 

Geoff

"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

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Except for the "Trenton" mark, it sounds like a Fisher. I have a 200# which I love. Fishers usually have a tool steel plate welded to a cast body. They have good rebound, but very little ring, which I also like. If someone has a copy of Anvils in America they can look up the section on Fishers and see if they were ever marked Trenton as well.

 

On a Fisher the top of the horn and the step are also tool steel.

 

Sounds like mine exactly...especially the part about good rebound and little ring (which actually worried me until I read this)...and the part about the top of the horn and step being tool steel is right on...

 

The "Trenton 99 CAST STEEL" was stamped in while the rest of the markings were cast...maybe somebody stamped it later.

 

Thanks for the info!!! :D

Henry Fonda was still throwing up before each stage performance when he was seventy-five. Fear of failure doesn't go away.

 

The warrior and the artist live by the same code of necessity, which dictates that the battle must be fought anew every day.

 

- STEVEN PRESSFELD

The War of Art

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Alan, from what I've just read in "Anvils in America" you've got a Fisher & Norris "Eagle" anvil. Fisher & Norris were located in Trenton, NJ, so that might be the orign of that. The patent date, along with the "Fisher" says what it is. I can't find wether or not they were ever marked "Trenton" or not. The main focus seems to be on the Eagle. I say you got a good deal if it's in good shape. Fisher & Norris was established in 1843 and was in buisness for 136 years, up until 1979. They advertized it by saying "Avoid deafness by working on and 'Eagle' Anvil. It does not ring."

Bob O

 

"When I raise my flashing sword, and my hand takes hold on judgment, I will take vengeance upon mine enemies, and I will repay those who haze me. Oh, Lord, raise me to Thy right hand and count me among Thy saints."

 

My Website

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