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New furnace: Bigger bloom.


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Very educational, interesting and fun, as usual.

 

Could I ask a question?

I noticed the tuyeres are close to 90 deg to the stack. Same on Walter's pic. What were the considerations in using this tuyere config ? Thanks.

 

Jerry

 

Jerry,

 

Thanks, the tuyres were placed at 90 Deg. to the stack because it was easier for me to enter a brittle clay pipe at 90 rather than trying to get too fancy. I have never had a problem with it, so why fix it.

The slag was tapped from below because I knew the sand would hold the shell together if I did not poke too many holes in the clay liner. That little furnace has also worked as a cupola though I do not recommend it as you have to be really fast with your transfer ladle to catch the molten iron (I have no photos of the event). Keeping the ladle hot and messing with the bottom tapping was just too much, even for two beginners.

 

Jan

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Thanks Jerry. Would fireclay do in your mix?

 

I would think so. Using charcoal as "aggregate" requires some maintainence after runs though, but such is the case no matter what refractory you use. White wash the exposed charcoal with some type of clay slurry, to seal the oxy off.

 

You can use the high heat bricks around the tuyeres, use the recipie for a mortar to coat the inside, etc. Even if some falls into the charge, it shouldn't damage the steel.

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For those interested please check the Events section of this forum.

 

We will hosting a smelt and hammer-in with Jesus Hernandez and Walter Sorrells at our forge in March of 2008

 

please keep posts about the event here

 

http://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=8918

 

so as not to disrupt the thread

 

Thanks!

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  • 5 weeks later...

Niko,

"Thanks for that note on the Titanium Oxide. Titanium seems to have a greater affinity for Oxygen than Iron does and the Titanium Mike mentions,may be in the form of an oxide and may also be what is seen as bright material in the welded zones of some Japnese blades (see Cyril Stanley Smith's "A HISTORY OF METALLOGRAPHY" page 44 )."

 

Jan

 

Niko,

Since writing the above quote, reading your post on Seams at weld locations, and doing some experiments (similar to what your friend did by welding a monosteel to itself), I have come to a different thought. By folding and welding 1095 several times using the straw/clay method you use for your tamahagane, I am finding crisp white lines which when intersected by polishing, look like the effect on the blade referenced above.

I am posting this as an edit and will take the topic up again in a couple of weeks on a thread dedicated to the topic.

 

Jan

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