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That looks like a good place for a power hammer...


Mike Lambiase

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I'd say ,,,"Put one there,,,"

 

jm

Blade

The blade, elegant
Slicing through the sweet, warm breeze
with a precise hit.


Sam Wands (10 years old)





Gold for the merchant, silver for the maid;
Copper for the craftsman, cunning at their trade.
Good! Laughed the baron, sitting in his hall;
But steel---cold steel---shall be master of them all!

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just show us the pictures of the one you got already!

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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Ok,... I have been working on this for about 2 years (on and off) at the local tech center where I went through the welding program.

 

I have never used a real power hammer and i have never been able to closely examine one.

 

I built this from pictures and reverse engineering.

 

I made at least 4 different ram guide assemblys till i got this one to work out well.

 

I took the basic linkage idea from the little giant, and what I have seen on the tire hammers

 

The clutch is a contact wheel to the tire.

 

The ram is square tubing filled with 50 lbs of #8 lead shot, and the dies are railroad track ground to shape. I guess it to weight in at around 70 lbs

 

The anvil is two parts, a center of eight- 1 1\4" round rods welded together in a box formation, sunk into an old oxygen bottle. Any space that existed between the two is now filled with spent ammunition and sand to take up the voids.

 

The motor is a 1 horse power lesson farm duty wired for 220.

 

everything that was purchased is from northern tool and equitment. Total cost... Less than 250$ out of pocket

 

I still have to give it an honorary paint job and a name.

 

 

PB120137.JPG

 

 

Mike Lambiase

Edited by Mike Lambiase

Mike Lambiase

Burning Man Forge

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Congratulations Mike! Well done, looks very well built! get some hot steel under that thing and let us know how she works! name her yet?

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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great to see things going good for you!

 

one things to add..... SPRING GUARD.... dont wait to make and install. stay safe!

 

Kerry

 

 

 

 

 

.

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Hey Kerry, good to hear from you.

 

I intend to build some sort of cage around it to prevent a skull spltting experiance.

 

Sam, I have not named it, I was going to wait untill I could run it so i can get a feel for her.

 

Right now the drive wheel that I made is slightly off kilter, and it weighs about a pound.

 

Tomorrow I will see about calling in a favor from a freind with a lathe. I have a peice of aluminum that would work for it, and I drew it out on auto cad.

 

She runs how I would imagine smooth to be, but I would still like to be up close with a real machine so I can double check all of my work.

 

that picture doesnt do it justice, It is a fairly imposing machine...

 

I still have to anchor it to the floor. Perhaps this week.

 

Mike Lambiase

Mike Lambiase

Burning Man Forge

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Cool Mike well done! be sure to use a rubber gasket or silicone putty underneath.

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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I looked all over for a hammer and could not find a good one. I also found out what kind of base/foundation I needed and there was no way it would fit. So, I have a press on the way. I am flying out to get trained on it next week. If you want I will keep you in the loop.

Jim Allen

Three Sisters Forge

Bend, Oregon

 

http://www.threesistersforge.com

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Looks good, but just a few things to think about. Is the foundation adiquate? I've read some comments where some models of air/power hammers need a thick foundation. What is the level of vibrations going to be when you use that thing? Is it going to rattle the pictures off the wall, damage the foundation of the house, destroy the garage floor? How tolerant are your neighbors, are they going to put up with the banging and rattling? I don't mean to rain on your parade but, if I read your profile right, you're 19. I remember being 19 (actually I don't, but I took copious notes :rolleyes: ) and I kind of remember a few instances where I didn't have all the information that I needed to make real good plans. An hydrolic press, which you might be able to make, or a fly press, which is a cheaper alternative to a commercially built hydrolic press, might be a better deal for you.

 

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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The hammer is in the garage and it has an 8 inch slab foundation.

 

I am putting anchor bolts into the concrete to keep it from shifting, and I have a 1\2" steel plate base on it that is 38" wide and 48" long.

 

It doesnt rock in any direction at all, and I have a 1\2 thick ballistic rubber mat under the whole thing.

 

There is no "ring" from the hammer or the anvil because everything is dampened with lead and there is no possibility for harmonic resonation.

 

The only sound that is made is the dull, thudding, pounding sound, and i make almost the same noise by hand, only my anvil rings.

 

The neighbors are all fairly tolerant, and i dont do any hammering after about 8:30 and most of them are not home during the day anyways.

 

I have my bases covered. And my father was a Marine logistician for 20 some-odd years, so everthing went through him, and he is unrelentlessly scrutinizing.

 

I am not even alowed to keep stuff (metal, tools, wood) outside of the house within visual range of the street. I wanted to put this in front of the garage, but he wouldnt let me because it would lower the neighborhood image.

 

Mike Lambiase

Mike Lambiase

Burning Man Forge

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Ok, Mike, it looks like you do have your bases covered. I was just a little concerned because some hammers require a 2-3 foot thick concrete pad to sit on, though I did run across an add for a air powered hammer that the maker claimed could go right on garage floor without reenforcement.

 

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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Yeah. I was looking at the schematics for mounting hammers, and I do not know if my foundation is thick enough.

 

If I start to see any cracking I will have to stop using it untill I can set up a more proper workshop on my own grounds.

 

But by that time I hope to own a substantial commercial hammer.

 

I did not just decided on what I want to do and and then just do it without thinking of the reprocussions, and I have taken to mind what you have said, it is all valid.

 

But I feel that my situation is one that permits a power hammer.

 

Respectfuly

Mike Lambiase

Edited by Mike Lambiase

Mike Lambiase

Burning Man Forge

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The rubber gasket will do VERY WELL to keep your floor from cracking, it should not be a problem.

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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While a heavy isolating foundation block is good for noise and vibration issues, and does improve efficiency a bit, you don't really need one on hammers under about 100 lbs ram weight in my opinion. I've been running my 50lb hammer on a wooden platform of 4x4s bolted together, with the whole thing bolted to the four-inch slab floor in my garage for over a year with no problems. With mechanical hammers the biggest problem is controlling the side-to-side wobble from the flywheel and linkage, helve-types excluded. Mine still rocks a little.

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I Have it welded to these 1\2 inch thick plates. the dimensions of the base are 48 1\2" long and 38" wide.

 

I cant get it to rock in any direction thankfully.

 

I am putting some 6 inch anchor bolts into the concrete and running them through the rubber mat and the plate. I dont think tht I will be getting much side to side.

 

I dont think that there is enough overkill to be had on the base plate.

Mike Lambiase

Burning Man Forge

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I dont think that there is enough overkill to be had on the base plate.

 

 

 

Well said:D.

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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Not to rob this thread, but since we're talking of concrete foundations here, can I ask you guys what would be best to put between the concrete and the metal plate? A thick rubber mat like Mike did, or wood planks like Allan suggested? After I finished building my "krusty"(R.I.P.) like power hammer, I realized that my shop floor isn't fit to handle the vibrations. So I made made a 3ft. deep concrete base for it beside my shop, with 8 bolts protruding from the concrete which will serve as anchors. Now I'm torn between wood or a rubber mat.

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Not to rob this thread, but since we're talking of concrete foundations here, can I ask you guys what would be best to put between the concrete and the metal plate? A thick rubber mat like Mike did, or wood planks like Allan suggested? After I finished building my "krusty"(R.I.P.) like power hammer, I realized that my shop floor isn't fit to handle the vibrations. So I made made a 3ft. deep concrete base for it beside my shop, with 8 bolts protruding from the concrete which will serve as anchors. Now I'm torn between wood or a rubber mat.

 

Wood AND rubber would be fine, but there is more "tricks". It is important, that a concrete base has enough weight to balance the hammers movement (individual for different hammers, but better more than less) and it's important to separate the base from floor (and other constructions). A good way is to make a sand "padding" under the base and around it. If made in this way, vibrations doesn't transfer to floor and walls.

 

Hope it helps

 

Tõnu

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I got my new contact wheel machined out on friday, and i tried it out.

 

It started to do what I would refer to as a "burn out" at initial contact, until it could get the wheel moving. I did the logical thing and i increased the leverage from the foot pedal to the back of the motor by welding on an extention to the back of the motor assembly. That solved that problem.

 

Now that I have good contact and enough leverage, I can get it moving at full rpms, and I discovered that my counter weight makes the thing go crazy at its full rpms.

 

It starts jumping around (left-right), the edges lift 2 inches off of the floor, and while i know that it is far too base heavy to tip over, it is walking all over my garage.

 

I am going to move it back into place and put some 5\8ths inch concrete anchors 4 inches into the floor to tie it down to.

 

I was wondering if that would be enough, and if there is a real possibility of it tearing those out of the floor. I dont have much experiance with the anchors, but I assume that if any motion is permitted to build up speed by way of a loose nut, it will eventually break those out of my floor.

Mike Lambiase

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Sounds like your counter weight is a bit too heavy.

 

 

I would suggest mounting a seat on it and riding it all over while you work:).

Edited by Sam Salvati

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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haha.. yeah Sam, you can come over and have the first ride. I will watch...

 

I guess that is also a good question. How should the counter weight affect the ram.

 

Should my ram be the heavier end, and lower itself back down to let the jaws close ( this would make me think it would hit harder)

 

Or should the counter weight be the heavier end? should it "reload" the ram and open the "jaws"?

 

right now my counter weight is the heavier end, and the jaws return to open when the hammer is idle.

Mike Lambiase

Burning Man Forge

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