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"abandoned " projects look better


matt venier

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I once heard George Lucas say that he doesn't finish movies he eventually "gives up " on them. I find I do that with projects when I get near the end, I kind of "abandon them for a few days. The thing that suprises me is that after a few days I go back and look at the project they always look WAY better to me. I'm wondering if this happens to anybody else, and I'm also thinking if I leave a project alone for a month or two how much better would it look then? :D :D :D

 

Matt

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Heck, that's a standard part of my routine! :lol: I work on something until I'm sick of it and think I can do no more, then walk away and leave it for a while. A day, a week, a few months or years, whatever. When I come back to it in the proper mood, I can usually see what needs to be done, if anything. I have a piece right now that's happening with. I keep thinking I need to do something else to it, then when I go out and look at it I realize it's fine the way it is.

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I have to build up a Q of about a 100 objects before I get anything done.... most stuff sits for about a month, some several years before completion!

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Getting that fresh perspective is essential to the process for me. I like to let things kinda sit and cool for a little while before I go back and put everything together permanently. Right now, I'm finishing up a knife I forged out 2 years ago. I wasn't satisfied with it then, so I let it hibernate. All that while, in the dark scary recesses of my mind, it was evolving. When I picked it up again, I re-profiled the blade and completely changed the plan for the hilt. Almost done with it now, and am very pleased with it. Expect it to be posted sometime next week.

"I'm not anti-gun. I'm pro-knife." Molly Ivins

NT Limpin' Cat Prokopp

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I'm starting to find that walking away from a project has it's advantages. It gives my brain a little time to stew over a problem that I might be having and suddenly I'm aware of the solution. It's like I was real dissatified with a dagger that I was forging, my first one, I layed it aside and fretted over it a bit and suddenly my feeble brain said "that's a Persian dagger". I took it out to the forge and changed it's profile. Then I set it down for a few days and picked it up again and I felt more satified with the design change. I feel better about it every time I pick it up.

 

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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I almost always have to leave a blade unfinished until it pops back up and demands to be finished. Sometimes for years they will hang in the shop or sit on a shelf until the right times comes. I know people who cook who will make a wonderful meal for everyone and then cannot eat themselves.

 

I'm kinda the same way. Sometimes I need to let the dust settle as I tend to be hyper critical about my work. If it doesn't look exactly like I wanted it in my minds eye I am often disatisfied and have to stop myself from recycling or destroying the blade.

 

Recently I tossed a bunch of blades in the Mississippi river in a fit of anger and depression. About 10 blades in all over a period of about 2 weeks. Mostly because there seemed no sense in finishing them at the time.

 

Brian

"Imagination is more important than knowledge" - Albert Einstein

 

"The innovator is not an opponent of the old. He is a proponent of the new."

- Lyle E. Schaller

 

http://home.mchsi.com/~hermits/BrianRVanSp..._Edged_Art.html

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