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Any ideas as to homemade flux?


aarya

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I'd disagree on ruining the steel by getting it sparking, just watch yoshindo's video they're sparkling all the time, yes you burn carbon out and yes you blow ther grain size, but both of these can be taken account for. I also have used flurospa and sal ammoniac and don't think they're necessary on normal run of the mill steels, I use them on steels with high chrome +1% and scrap as I don't know whats in it

 

 

john ,

it is worth taking into acount what it is that you are making before you think of burning and then repairing it .

A knife blade is somthing that can save a life or injure if it breaks .

staying well within the limits of the material will assure a safer blade ,burning steel is asking for trouble .

you are also entering into a situation where you end up with a loss of predictability due to possable large amounts of carbon loss through burning .

 

tamahagane is a diferent fish

 

Ric Barret also welds hot ,at least at the demo I saw (sparkling ) BUT his start material is V high carbon tamahagane it looks and sparks at over 1.5% carbon ,the material can afford the huge carbon losses .

forging soul in to steel

 

owenbush.co.uk

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i have a 25 layer (or somewhere around there) mild steel billet in my room that i didnt use any flux on. although i'm using a gas forge, so it's a bit easier. but it IS possible to weld without flux.

 

I have done a lot of welding of mild steel and quite a bit of wrought iron .

 

they are both very easy to weld with out flux as the material is still stable at the high temp needed for melting the scale .

lots of sparks and lots of material loss (you normally upset joints before welding to take acount of the metal lost through welding)

this just doesnt work for steel .

forging soul in to steel

 

owenbush.co.uk

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Doug: Copy that! I had actually looked at a large pump of sorts, that was described as pumping on both the up and downstroke, and i`ll check again, to see if i can find that one again. And while fireplace bellows might outperform lung power, they need to be constructed properly. (The bellows i had, sucked air through the tip. That`s what you get for buying cheap things. <_<

Hey Aarya, if you want simple bellows, go for bag bellows:

http://1501bc.com/metalworking/forging/10120003.JPG

They're easy to make, no valves that can go wrong and they give a very continuous steady air flow if you get the technique properly (no huff-puff). Aside from the really large double acting bellow used in our medieval forge, these are by far the most efficient to use, and achieve the highest temperature (more then enough capacity for forging). If you're ever interested in making them, LMK and I give some pointers.

Jeroen Zuiderwijk

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/barbarianmetalworking

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All I was saying owen it that if your a beginner do'nt throw a billet away just because you've had a few sparks, if you've got a steel with say 0.8% carbon and you accidently end up with 0.5% carbon it'll still harden to 58 Rc and you'll learn to be more vigilent and you can correct the grain size by repeated normalising cycles.

 

I agree you'll end up with an uncertain end product, but you will end up with an end product not a growing scrap pile, you obviously wouldn't be able to think of sell in such a product, but you'll have salvaged something. I've always found if you go away with something you'll keep your interest and not be to disheartened though maybe not 100% happy with the end result.

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Thanks for all the replies here guys! I really do appreciate it. :)

As for sparks, grain growth, burning steel and all that. Well, i`m a newbie. And i know it.

Up until a few months ago, i thought that steel had to have atleast a yellow heat when i was going to harden it. (And, yes, colour was and still is all i have to go by.)

Colour me embarrassed, when i found out that most of the regular, low-alloy steel that i use, O1/1095/1070/5160/etc. Only needs to be a dull to cherry red. Well, according to the heat-treating manual i got atleast.

The first time i was going to quench a blade of mine, i got it so hot that it actually melted. Yes, there were sparks. Lots of sparks. :lol::D

The second time i tried to quench something, i purposely broke it into two pieces, to see how it looked like on the inside. Let`s just say that the grains were around 1/32" or 1mm. So yeah, quite visible to the naked eye.

So i`m quite capable of learning from my mistakes. Rest assured.

 

On this here welding topic, well. I haven`t done much, other than trying it once. It being proper winter here, with lots of snow and cold, and me working outside only. Well. I think you can guess at the result. I was too cold to focus properly, and the result was just crap.

But i`m still focused on learning this here art of welding. And seeing as i`ve got a rather large plate of 1/8" thick 15n20 that`s just waiting to be married to some 1095 or 1070, to again be created into a pattern-welded blade of some sort. Yeah, it`s not something i`m gonna stop trying to learn.

 

Come summer, and i`ll hopefully be able to get in some real time with hammer in hand.

 

Am i the only one who feels like it does the body good to hammer some hot steel?

I mean, my body actually feels happy, after having worked some steel.

It`s like one of the old-time Norwegian blacksmith/knifemakers said: "Ein blir så god i skrotten av å smi."

Freely translated into English, for you non-Norwegians; "Your body feels so good when you`re smithing."

 

Well, it`s time for me to sharpen some knives i think.

 

-Jo

Nothing is as beautiful, as the colour of orange-hot steel!

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Hi... Fellow Norwegian here. :)

 

Good to see some more Norskies find there way to the forum. I just started forging blades 2 years a go or something... I made my self a Japanese style Box bellows and it has worked out really well. I bought some borax from Steen Nielsen Smifirma, Kniv & kunst

May I ask where you got your steel? I ended up ordering 25mm diameter W1 (din 1.1545) roundbar from the Netherlands, and I quickly realised that hamering it down by hand is a lot of work, now I'm making myself a bottlejack style hydraulic press. ;)

So if you have a local sourse of good blade steel it would be great if you'd share it with me. :D

 

Ein blir så god i skrotten av å smi
Det skal være sikkert og visst! :D

Marius A. Bacher

 

"To learn and not think over what you have learned is perfectly useless. To think without having learned is dangerous." - Gore Vidal

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Am i the only one who feels like it does the body good to hammer some hot steel?

I mean, my body actually feels happy, after having worked some steel.

You're definately not the only one. It's basically like a good sport but better, as you're actually doing something cool and making something as well :) It's actually also a great way to prevent RSI, when you're day job is at the office!

Jeroen Zuiderwijk

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/barbarianmetalworking

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Marius: Hi, fellow Norskie! ^_^

I haven`t found a local source of good steel, other than drooling at a new pair of shock-springs that my brother bought for his car a while back.

I usually just order mine from sløyd-detaljer or from Nordell. Kinda wish we had the likes of Crucible or Admiral in scandinavia somewhere. Ohhwell, gotta make due with what you got i suppose. *shrugs*

Edited by aarya

Nothing is as beautiful, as the colour of orange-hot steel!

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i am told that you can cook the borax pure and gring up the remains and wind up bassically with a form of anhydrous borax. good luck jeff

if you cook borax it will foam up some and turn to a dark glassy shape , then it needs to be powdered befor use,

K&G finishing supply(1-800-972-1192) sells a bill fiorini formula flux in a 5LB can for $15.00USD

(cat # FWF) this stuff works great on cable and any other billit I'v used it on

I like it

Mike

K&G finishing supply

1972 lake forest ave

lakeside AZ 85929

Edited by mike desensi

Member:

Cal Knives

Practioner:

Suio Ryu Iai Kenpo

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