Jump to content

Groover/fullering cutting tool


Recommended Posts

I am working on a dagger that will have a fuller groove and needed a groove cutting tool. So I built one out of 1/2" square mild steel. The bit is 1095 and interchangable. I turned the square bar to 3/8" round and peened a scotch broom wood handle between two steel caps.

 

The guide bar is adjustable from 1/8" out to 1 3/4".

 

groover1-web.jpg

 

 

groover2_web.jpg

 

It also takes 1/4" and 3/8" lath chisels.

 

groover3_web.jpg

Edited by B Finnigan
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Don and Alan! I may be able to talk my daughter into shooting some video it. It cuts like butta' and every 3-4 passes I have to clear the cutings out. Even using one hand with no pressure on the tension knob it cuts aggresively.

 

This was my first test cut on some mild steel.

 

groovertest.jpg

 

Alan, I didn't know it had scopalamine in it. I use the patches when I go deep sea fishing for motion sickness. Maybe I will save a few bucks and bring some tops and a pipe. :blink:

Edited by B Finnigan
Link to post
Share on other sites

for starters i'd like to say that that is a beautiful tool that you have made there. out of curiosity though, how would some one put a fuller into a large sword that tapers along its length?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice looking tool. I like the adjustability of it. Does it chatter at all while cutting? Do you use it dry or with cutting lube?

 

On a longer blade that tapers, you can still get a straight line by putting the blade on top of another piece that is straight and using it to guide the tool.

 

Jamie

Link to post
Share on other sites

It only chatters if you get the rake angle wrong. I have not tried any lube yet since it seems to work fine dry. Once you get a slot going the guide is not needed.

 

If I was to build another one I would add a few degrees more curve to it for some extra cleareance.

Edited by B Finnigan
Link to post
Share on other sites
On a longer blade that tapers, you can still get a straight line by putting the blade on top of another piece that is straight and using it to guide the tool.

 

Jamie

 

 

 

brilliant. thanks

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

My sanding/draw filing fixture also was used as a straight edge for the guide.

 

dagger-web.jpg

 

(No comments about my clutered bench, I know where everything is at. :unsure: )

Edited by B Finnigan
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Just finished my take on the thing. Gotta thank Brent for the idea and examples. This is one area (of many) that I havn't been able to do to my blades satisfactorily.

 

groover.jpg

grooverclose.jpg

 

I changed up the shaft so that it stayed in line, but provided something of a finger clearance. Seems promising in initial tests.

 

And no, I don't make tools purty for myself :rolleyes:

 

Dan

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool beans!! There is an improvement that another member from Primal Fires came up with for the guide that I have not posted yet. With multiple brains making and using the same tool a type of "gadget evolution" will happen. I grew up watching both my dad and grandfather design and create in thier shops. Both of them were hardcore function-over-form people and that philosophy stuck with me.

 

Last night I spent a couple hours grinding some lathe bits and not once did I stop, step back and look at my $1400 grinder and say to myself "Dang, what a beautiful, symetrical, flowing piece of machinery". I got it to do a job and it does it well so I am satisfied. What it looks like is not going to help me one bit.

 

Both sides of my family have a long lineage of talented craftsmen but not a single artist.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Cool beans!! There is an improvement that another member from Primal Fires came up with for the guide that I have not posted yet. With multiple brains making and using the same tool a type of "gadget evolution" will happen.

I'd buy one. Even an ugly one. Who here wouldn't. Great ideas guys.

 

Re. the tapered sword question: For us stock removers it wouldn't be a problem, just do it on the flatbar before grinding commences.

 

Otherwise yes, clamp the tapered sword to a flat bar. You could even have a depth setter wheel that rolls along the flatbed so that the fullerer (lol) stays the same height above and would thus fade out nicely as the distal taper increases.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I used 1/2" but it doesn't matter as long as it can hold the bit, guide and some type of handle. The hole for the bit does not have to square either. It just allows for larger bits w/o having to use a bigger chunk of square bar.

 

I will be making a smaller version for cutting borders on bracelets, pendants, etc. Right now I am using my leather groover which is not what it was made for. :blink:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine was just 1/2" square mild steel. Bit slot takes a 3/8" lathe bit, or custom ground.

 

I did change the guide up from the pics. Instead of bending the 1/4" round rod, like in the picture, I went back and silver brazed two peices together to get a cleaner 90 degree angle. Also inlet the hole in the main bar somewhat to get the guide closer to the bit. On japanese style, I want to get pretty close to the mune, within an eighth inch or so.

 

Dan

Edited by dan pfanenstiel
Link to post
Share on other sites

I cut a 1/4" slice of 1/4" x 2" angle for the guide to get closer. Should have done it that way first but that is how tool prototyping goes sometimes. Measure once and cut twice (or more :wacko: ).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's mine, turned up to show. The notch is what I was talking about to allow the guide to get a little closer to bit center. At this point, the closest it'll get, it's at about 3/16" from guide edge to center bit.

 

New bit there is just a piece of 01 hand ground to a half round shape and hardened.

 

groovyguide.jpg

 

Dan

Link to post
Share on other sites

The notch is a great idea! It will be cool to watch this tool evolve as more brains go to work on it for slightly different applications. This is what the forums are all about, pooling our collective ignorance and seeing what comes of it.:rolleyes:

Link to post
Share on other sites

great pic and great evolution Dan! I presume the depth setter wheel could be the extra-mile but it is probably too sofisticated for me.

I'll try to find a square bare to start my tool. You drilled the lathe-tool hole and then file it square correct?

Edited by loneronin
Link to post
Share on other sites

That is how I did it since I looked all over for a square drill bit to no avail.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just wanted to say that this is a really great tool and a wonderful contribution to the forum. That being said.. Gotta get my two cents worth in! You could also weld or solder on a piece like in the cheesy paint shop touch up of your picture below. It would not decrease the strength of the bar this way. I have been watching this thread and thinking about this tool. I am envisioning something with handles on it like a hand plane. In a few months when I get some time I'll have to give it a go!

~Bruce~

post_1068_1204684809.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...