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Apple Blossom Bowie


Unclemike13

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This is a knife that I finished back in November, using techniques that I've been working on for several years. It is the seventh blade I've finished using these techniques.

 

Steels: Ladder damascus of 1084 and 15N20, inlayed with floral elements of high carbon and nickle alloy steels.

Handle: Stabilized Juniper burl grip with Wrought iron (old anchor chain), guard and spacer.

 

My thanks to Jim Cooper (SharpByCoop.com), for creating such a wonderful image and for submitting it to Blade Magazine (and others), on my behalf. This one showed up in the January 2008 issue of "Knife World" and the March 2008 issue of Blade.

 

6692e959.jpg

 

Thank you for looking

 

Michael

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Thank you all for your comments.

 

Fantastic. How did you get the inlays in ?

Jim - The damascus billet is pierced using the carved design elements as templets. I use carbide burrs and an assortment of files. Each element is fitted into its respective place and then forge welded into place. Once the billet is sound, it is forged into its final shape as a blade. In this particular piece there were several separate piercing and welding stages since some of the elements "overlay" other elements.

 

Michael

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Thank you all for your comments.

Jim - The damascus billet is pierced using the carved design elements as templets. I use carbide burrs and an assortment of files. Each element is fitted into its respective place and then forge welded into place. Once the billet is sound, it is forged into its final shape as a blade. In this particular piece there were several separate piercing and welding stages since some of the elements "overlay" other elements.

 

Michael

Mike,

 

Agree with Alan, the next level and beyond. To keep those in control with welding and forging is truly beyond. Thank you for sharing.

Jim Allen

Three Sisters Forge

Bend, Oregon

 

http://www.threesistersforge.com

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WOW MIKE! Spark of genius you have there:D, that is amazing work very nicely done.

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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Thank you all so much for your comments.

 

DFogg Posted Today, 04:21 PM

Well done, I thought it was masked and etched, but very nicely done. Thanks for sharing.

 

Don, The first time I saw your work - oh, so many years ago - it was your cherry blossom logo, gold somehow bonded into a hole in the blade, that set me onto this track. Thank you.

 

Michael

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UNCLE MIKE--- Thanks for letting us see your work. Incredible--The inlays simply put--are icing on the cake for the rest of the piece. Great job

 

chuck bennett

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uncle mike,

i was wondering.. the next time you do a knife with inlays like this.. would you be willing to take some pictures of the process?

also.. i think you should seriously consider patenting your process.. if possible. (not to close the opportinity.. but i havent ever seen anything like that..)

that is so awesome

thanks for showing

~Chris

-Knifemaker-

MossKnives.jpg

http://knifemaker87.googlepages.com/home

 

Hamons are a painting; blades are a canvas, clay is my paint, fire is my brush. the problem is.. i am still painting like Pablo Picasso.

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Thanks guys.

 

Chris Moss Posted Yesterday, 08:53 PM

uncle mike, i was wondering.. the next time you do a knife with inlays like this.. would you be willing to take some pictures of the process?

also.. i think you should seriously consider patenting your process.. if possible. (not to close the opportinity.. but i havent ever seen anything like that..)

that is so awesome

thanks for showing

~Chris

 

Chris - I'm currently working on a "tutorial" for the basic techniques of this process. As far as patients go - I really just don't think that would be appropriate. It would be counter-productive to my intentions. If another maker has the guts and perserverence to create a work of art using these techniques, well - I applaud them. If another maker should develop new techniques based upon my work, well again - I applaud them. The end result in both cases will be beneficial to the craft of bladesmithing. All I would ask really is honesty from other makers in giving me credit for my part in the development. My "inspiration" for this work came from the works of Don Fogg, Steve Schwartzer and Pierre Revardy, as I have stated on my website. Without the hard work and new ideas from these fine artists, I doubt that I would even be making knives today.

 

Michael

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Uncle Mike,

 

well.. i have to say that i think you work is worth appluading, but i really really would like to copy it too! *grins* now i a currently working just making my welds good.. so i have a ways to go.. but i would love to try it some time.. so thanks for giving us makers that freedom. and i am sure with such inspiration you would get the regocnition. thanks so much for sharing!

i look forward to the tutorial!

~Chris

-Knifemaker-

MossKnives.jpg

http://knifemaker87.googlepages.com/home

 

Hamons are a painting; blades are a canvas, clay is my paint, fire is my brush. the problem is.. i am still painting like Pablo Picasso.

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