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Aegloin - migration period styled sax


David D.

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Here is our most recent, a migration era styled sax we named Aegloin.

 

sax1kz1.jpg

 

sax2ra0.jpg

 

sax3yp4.jpg

 

sax4xd5.jpg

 

 

This was an off and on project that would be worked on and then laid aside for months before it was finally finished.

 

This really is Andy's piece, its just that he got frustrated and annoyed with it over time and I took over after a while... :)

 

Andy forged the blade from 1075, he heat treated it and he assembled the handle and scabbard.

 

I then did the carvings and did the finishing blade polish, wood oiling and sealing, sharpened the blade, and added the name in Anglo Saxon runes on the blade.

 

 

I finally got a proper set of chisels thanks to the advise of Jake Powning. made a worlds difference from the junky tools I was using. made the job better quality but still hard detailed work.. I have new found respect for everyone who does detailed knotwork carving... I don't know how they can get so intricate... its insane!

 

 

here are the stats:

 

steel type: 1075

wood type: curly maple

blade: 10 1/2 inches

OAL: 15 1/2 inches

scabbard: 13 inches

 

 

But while we have you guys looking we want your opinion as well...

 

we are not sure if we should add a metal clip on the back of the scabbard so it would easily hook onto a belt. It would not be the most historically accurate thing but it would be convenient for whoever buys it is they want to carry it or put it to use.

 

here is an example of what we are thinking made out of paper:

 

sax5ft2.jpg

 

 

So please share your thoughts and let us know what you think!

 

Thanks guys :)

 

David.

Edited by David D3

I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness,

nor the warrior for his glory. I love only that which they defend"

J.R.R. Tolkien

 

 

www.CedarloreForge.com

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The carving is REALLY coming along and I love the way the handle fits into the sheath. I would, however, like to have a better view of the blade if you have one to post. Not too keen on your idea for a back steel clip to hang the sheath on the belt. If I were doing it I'd do a simple leather frog for the sheath to slip down into, but that's just me. It's your project.

 

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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I agree with Doug, Leather would look much more classy with a soft wood like that. Great work guys!

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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This is a tutorial for making a nickel silver sheath but, you could make a "button" like they use on this one and attach it to your wooden sheath. Seems simpler than making the piece you modeled in paper.Metal Sheath Tutorial

The tutorial came from this site, which has a lot of other useful tutorials. knivesby.com

 

By the way... Nice Sax! Good job on this one, you guys are turning out some very fine work.

Edited by B. Norris

“All work is empty save when there is love, for work is love made visible.” Kahlil Gibran

"It is easier to fight for one's principles than to live up to them." - Alfred Adler

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This is a tutorial for making a nickel silver sheath but, you could make a "button" like they use on this one and attach it to your wooden sheath. Seems simpler than making the piece you modeled in paper.Metal Sheath Tutorial

The tutorial came from this site, which has a lot of other useful tutorials. knivesby.com

 

By the way... Nice Sax! Good job on this one, you guys are turning out some very fine work.

 

 

Thanks Mr. Norris! That is an awesome idea. might think about trying that possibly.

I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness,

nor the warrior for his glory. I love only that which they defend"

J.R.R. Tolkien

 

 

www.CedarloreForge.com

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David,

 

I think this is the best piece you've produced yet. Everything looks professional quality, and your carving has improved quite a bit in a short period of time.

 

I think you and your friends have the double advantage of:

1) talent

2) having three of you working together makes it so you can bounce ideas off of each other, which makes you able to learn and improve faster than a solitary smith.

 

Add your character and determination into the mix, and I see a bright future in store for all of you.

Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who did not.

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2) having three of you working together makes it so you can bounce ideas off of each other, which makes you able to learn and improve faster than a solitary smith.

 

Don't underestimate the advantage of having another couple pair of hands to hold tools or strike! I know I would be capable of so much more if I just had a decent helper. Oh well, another couple of years and the kids will be available for slave labor!

“All work is empty save when there is love, for work is love made visible.” Kahlil Gibran

"It is easier to fight for one's principles than to live up to them." - Alfred Adler

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Bravo, exelent work,

I really like how the carving is comming along, (fun to have good tools isn't it)

and I agree that the clip, while very practical, would detract form the overall flow of the pice.

One thought, if wanted to stick with the clip Idea you might try a forged one that wouldn't be visible from the front.

Keep up the good work.

 

Got a question, how are you guy's engraving the blades? and at what point in the process?

 

forge ahead,

 

Ben

Ben Potter Bladesmith

 

 

It's not that I would trade my lot

Or any other man's,

Nor that I will be ashamed

Of my work torn hands-

 

For I have chosen the path I tread

Knowing it would be steep,

And I will take the joys thereof

And the consequences reap.

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Hey I just noticed the work on the back of the tang, AWSOME that is really a great idea.

have you seen that on historical blades or is that your own inovation?

I really like and can't wiat to put it on one of my blades!

Ben Potter Bladesmith

 

 

It's not that I would trade my lot

Or any other man's,

Nor that I will be ashamed

Of my work torn hands-

 

For I have chosen the path I tread

Knowing it would be steep,

And I will take the joys thereof

And the consequences reap.

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WOW!!! Every time you guys post a pic I'm impressed by the growth of the skill you guys continue to show. (I hate you all B) ) Really great work and the carving is fantastic. I also agree that leather would be a big improvement over the metal clip. Forge On.

 

Hahaha :D you saying that you hate us is a HUGE compliment!!!.. :) I love your work and are inspired by it as well, so to me that's a compliment ;)

 

 

David,

 

I think this is the best piece you've produced yet. Everything looks professional quality, and your carving has improved quite a bit in a short period of time.

 

I think you and your friends have the double advantage of:

1) talent

2) having three of you working together makes it so you can bounce ideas off of each other, which makes you able to learn and improve faster than a solitary smith.

 

Add your character and determination into the mix, and I see a bright future in store for all of you.

 

Thanks so much Mr. Renico! yeah it is awesome working with my best friends at the thing I love the most. Though I know one day our lives will start taking different routes and we may have to forge together. we will still try to hold the name M A D until we are old grey geezers. and that makes me happy :)

 

 

Excellent work, I really need to start working on my stuff. Are you going to YouTube this one too? I really enjoyed the last one.

 

Thanks Tony! agh I wish we would have documented the process of this one for a video!.. but we didn't. although I am planning on documenting my next project hopefully. Whatever it is.

 

 

And thanks guys for your input on the clip. I agree I think we are going to ditch the steel clip idea and do something with leather instead.

We really appreciate you advice and opinions, it means a ton!

 

Thanks so much!

I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness,

nor the warrior for his glory. I love only that which they defend"

J.R.R. Tolkien

 

 

www.CedarloreForge.com

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nice one. i love the fit of the sheath and handle. your carving is really coming along, although my one criticism of that would be that you seem to have gotten a bit lost with the interlace on the sheath: with celtic/norse knotwork, i feel it works best if everything weaves together - over/under/over/under etc.

 

my more general criticisms would be that the shape of the fish tail at the end of the handle is a little under defined for my taste, i feel that this area should have more precise lines and flow. And finally, i think that the runes are a little too big - they'd look better confined to the top 1/3rd of the blade.

 

If all this sounds a little harsh, i don't mean it to be. It's just that your work has progressed so far that i think you should be held to a higher standard. But everything i've said is personal taste, and i think it's freaking cool that you guys have stepped into the historical pieces arena, and maintained your own sense of style.

 

oh, and i may be in the minority here, but i like the clip idea. it may not seem as right as a leather frog, but i think for this piece it is appropriate, because i see no way of doing it in leather without covering the knotwork. i would make it from copper though - just seems easier to get a tight spring fit without messing up the wood finish and i think the colour would look better with the maple.

 

The button idea is also good - one way would be to inlay and epoxy a nut into the back of the sheath, make a leather belt loop with a hole punched in the bottom, and use a cut down bolt through the hole and screwed into the nut. thats pretty much how i did the belt loop on that blue double edged dirk thing i did.

 

Once again, great work. i wish i'd had half your ambition and comittment at your age. you guys inspire me to try cooler and more difficult stuff, and at the same time you make me feel so very old.

Jake Cleland - Skye Knives

www.knifemaker.co.uk

"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."

"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."

 

Albert Einstein

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I agree with everything Jake said above, except of course the part about doing the blue dagger, since I didn't do that. ;)

 

You guys are both an inspiration and a kick in the behind to us old folks, which is a hard thing to perform simultaneously. :lol:

 

If you wanted to get REALLY funkadelic on the frog idea, dovetail an ebony button onto the back. Not one of the Japanese style ones, just a knob... :huh:

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nice one. i love the fit of the sheath and handle. your carving is really coming along, although my one criticism of that would be that you seem to have gotten a bit lost with the interlace on the sheath: with celtic/norse knotwork, I feel it works best if everything weaves together - over/under/over/under etc.

 

My more general criticisms would be that the shape of the fish tail at the end of the handle is a little under defined for my taste, i feel that this area should have more precise lines and flow. And finally, i think that the runes are a little too big - they'd look better confined to the top 1/3rd of the blade.

 

If all this sounds a little harsh, I don't mean it to be. It's just that your work has progressed so far that I think you should be held to a higher standard. But everything i've said is personal taste, and i think it's freaking cool that you guys have stepped into the historical pieces arena, and maintained your own sense of style.

 

 

Jake, Thank you so much!!!

 

You can't imagine how much we appreciate and enjoy your honesty and advice!

In no way do I take your words harshly, in fact I really enjoy them and keep them in mind whenever we start on our next projects.

It’s exactly the kind of response we want. :D

 

and I totally agree to, I did get lost a bit with the knotwork carving. I like my original base idea, but I didn’t weave them together tightly enough and make the over under consistent. My edgy, strait, chippy artistic style battles with knotwork all the time, but its a challenge that I enjoy. :)

 

It seriously is an honor Jake, we adore your work!!

 

 

 

I agree with everything Jake said above, except of course the part about doing the blue dagger, since I didn't do that. ;)

 

You guys are both an inspiration and a kick in the behind to us old folks, which is a hard thing to perform simultaneously. :lol:

 

 

Mr. Longmire, you have no idea how much of an honor that is for us!

 

The idea that we are in some way inspiring the very people who inspire us is a strange and scary thought!.. lol :)

 

But I suppose that can be a good thing as insane as it is, this place is like a perpetual motion machine of bladesmith’s. And I love that.

 

:D

 

 

Thank you so much!

I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness,

nor the warrior for his glory. I love only that which they defend"

J.R.R. Tolkien

 

 

www.CedarloreForge.com

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Great work guys, all around! You are lucky to have the brotherhood of the Dwarves, cherish it and enjoy it. Plus you guys do look so darn MAD :lol: Great graphics on the logo/sign too! The quality of the carving has a lot to do with the wood in my experience. A softer wood needs big, bold, knotty knot work, a fine interlace requires a fine grained harder wood to hold the detail. Carving knot work in coarse, open grained wood like red oak will rid you of any tendency to mis-placed fussyness and is great practice! :rolleyes:

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