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Alex Brydges

Mora blades, hardness?

4 posts in this topic

I was gifted a mora not to long ago, and have not been impressed by the hardness of the blade. I have read great things about the quality of the laminated Moras made in sweeden. My question is: has anyone else found moras to be rather soft, or have i just found a lemon? Is it worth taking apart and hardening? If so, does any one know the core steel type mora uses?

-A

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It depends on which model knife you have,in most cases they are a less than $20 knife.A rockwell hardness of around 58 on C scale is what they are listed as.I have made many knives with the Eriksen blades with no complaints from customers,you may have gotten a bad blade to start with. I would take a Scandinavian blade over an Asian import any day.

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As near as i can tell (it is old and has some degree of wear) it says frasts (frosts?) mora made in sweden, laminated steel. i can see the color contrast between the steels because of the oxidation (age). I have also noticed that the tang is very weak (cant pry stuff with it without bending it), which makes it rather useless as a work knife. Is there any hope of re hardening it? oil quench? thanks.

-A

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The tangs on most of the blades are soft and the knives are not designed for heavy use as in prying. Common practice is to pein the end of the tang against a small brass washer and the handle to hold the handle on the knife. Most scandis are used for general purposes from peeling an apple to wood carving and gutting fish. If a heavier duty knife is needed they rely on a leuku type knife made for heavy duty use. I can't help you with hardening info,you may want to try the scandi section at British Blades Forum.

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