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rough sketch


Chris Moss

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hey everybody..

here is something i was wanting to make, kinda doodling.

i was wanting to try something more... american.. thought it has a slight mediteranian flare to it.

 

this isnt a final drawing.. it wil be a little "thinner" it is too fat, and the handle is too short.. or i might leave it as is just not make it as long

 

the over all size would be about 15" i think W2 steel, damascus blosters, tapered tang, and carved ebony scales.

 

critique?

 

Photo249.jpg

thanks

~chris

Edited by Chris Moss

-Knifemaker-

MossKnives.jpg

http://knifemaker87.googlepages.com/home

 

Hamons are a painting; blades are a canvas, clay is my paint, fire is my brush. the problem is.. i am still painting like Pablo Picasso.

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Chris, looks good, I would say go for W1 or W2(obviously) for this one, if for a meditteranean flare a little choil/spanish notch at the base of the blade would really set that off.

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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From what you said about the overall length, I'd say thatt the handle is just a tad too long. From the sketch it looks like it would be 5+" as drawn. However, I'd keep the flaired end as is. Overall, it has great lines; I love the way you carry the curve straight through across the back except for a little reverse curve at the flair of the handle. The width of the blade looks good to me as is. It looks like the blade will end up around 10" but still not be a "chopper" so a high carbon steel like W1 or W2 would be apropriate. I would also keep the blade towards the thin side. However, (always the "however") it's your baby and you're the one who has to be happy with the end product.

 

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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My only piece of advice is to either remove or round the point facing down in towards the handle. I just see far too much potential for self injury there. Well, that, and I tried soemhting similar once and now have a nice little scar from it. Perhaps if the arc length underneath that curve is large enough, you could leave it, but it seems like it's just too good of a way to end up with a blade in severe need of cleaning, as well as a new hole in your forefinger.

Edited by Doug Bostic
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thanks for the advice.. i plan on takin g all of it to some extent or another, however i have to ask,

sam, what is a spanish notch? i would love to try it, but dont know what it is.

 

and i think i will adjust a few lines, but on a whole leave the shape as is. thanks for hte comments they are greatly appreciated and i welcome more.

thanks again

~chris

-Knifemaker-

MossKnives.jpg

http://knifemaker87.googlepages.com/home

 

Hamons are a painting; blades are a canvas, clay is my paint, fire is my brush. the problem is.. i am still painting like Pablo Picasso.

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http://64.176.180.203/photo11.htm

 

Something along those lines(the little scroll at the base of the edge).

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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The handle immediately reminded me of Don’s recently posted T2, which you are quoting pretty directly (I find Don’s elegant and powerful designs very inspiring as well). If you like stylized plant motifs as a design element, you may wish to do a google image search for "Karl Blossfeldt," he photographed plants in a way that shows their abstract design potential very well.

;)

blossfeldt.jpg

Jomsvikingar Raða Ja!

http://vikingswordsmith.com

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Chris

I really like it. It has nice flow and the flair elements

add alot to the overall design. I have one question

will your index finger fit into the current notch or will

the pointed part come in contact with your finger?

Might need to consider that, and perhaps you already

have. Please post pic's as you progress!!!

Tom

So.Ga.

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wow! i just went and checked out Don's new peice.. WOW.

that is gorgious.. and i can in all consience say that i drew the picture before sing his knife (includibng the habaki) wow.. it is gorgious!

 

as for the notch.. what i was planing on doing was, becasue of the grind, i can flair the grind a tad so that "spur" isnt sharp ont he bottom.. and we will see hos much of it stays, but i like the notch, however i know what a sharpened spur like that can do to your hand..

 

i think this is gonna be alot of fun, and i will be sure to post pics as i wok on it.

thanks so very much!

~Chris

-Knifemaker-

MossKnives.jpg

http://knifemaker87.googlepages.com/home

 

Hamons are a painting; blades are a canvas, clay is my paint, fire is my brush. the problem is.. i am still painting like Pablo Picasso.

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wow! i just went and checked out Don's new peice.. WOW.

that is gorgious.. and i can in all consience say that i drew the picture before sing his knife (includibng the habaki) wow.. it is gorgious!

 

as for the notch.. what i was planing on doing was, becasue of the grind, i can flair the grind a tad so that "spur" isnt sharp ont he bottom.. and we will see hos much of it stays, but i like the notch, however i know what a sharpened spur like that can do to your hand..

 

i think this is gonna be alot of fun, and i will be sure to post pics as i wok on it.

thanks so very much!

~Chris

 

 

 

A word of caution when heat treating a blade with a spanish notch, Unless you are heat treating in a controlled temp, be careful because the little end of the scroll will get hot faster then anything else. I burnt the end of one right off. Am I the only one ever to do this? Probably!

 

Tony G

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i saw a few pictures of a knife with a hole in the bladfe and a really fancy philipino notching patern, and the guy who made it covered that part with clay to keep it from getting too hot. if i do a spanish notch, i will prolly use clay to keep it from burning, but thanks for warning me.. i hadnt thought about that.

thanks so much!

~Chris

-Knifemaker-

MossKnives.jpg

http://knifemaker87.googlepages.com/home

 

Hamons are a painting; blades are a canvas, clay is my paint, fire is my brush. the problem is.. i am still painting like Pablo Picasso.

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  • 1 month later...

got the blade forged up.. and rough ground... now i need to finish normalizing it.

then i will draw file it and clay it up

let me know what you think

Photo262.jpg

Photo263.jpg

thanks!

~Chris

-Knifemaker-

MossKnives.jpg

http://knifemaker87.googlepages.com/home

 

Hamons are a painting; blades are a canvas, clay is my paint, fire is my brush. the problem is.. i am still painting like Pablo Picasso.

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That looks great so far Chris nice shape!

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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I agree Chris, nice shape. I can't wait to see it done.

Bob O

 

"When I raise my flashing sword, and my hand takes hold on judgment, I will take vengeance upon mine enemies, and I will repay those who haze me. Oh, Lord, raise me to Thy right hand and count me among Thy saints."

 

My Website

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that/s looking really good although i don't quite get the carved handle bit. it would look good with cocobolo :D

jared Z.

 

lilzee on britishblades.

 

From now on, ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put.

-Sir Winston Churchill

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hey!

thanks man! actually the blade is in the oven as we speak.. i heat treated it (again) and i dont think i cracked it.. so i am happy..

and i bought some ebony for the handle.. and i am going to use wraught iron for the bolster.

 

as for the handle.. the part that is "carved" in the drawing wil be cut down into the wood.. i dont know if it will look just like the pic.. prolly not.. but something like that... it is just something i have been toying with and finally have a chance to try it.

i will try and take come pics of the blade after it comes out of HT.

thanks again!

~Chris

-Knifemaker-

MossKnives.jpg

http://knifemaker87.googlepages.com/home

 

Hamons are a painting; blades are a canvas, clay is my paint, fire is my brush. the problem is.. i am still painting like Pablo Picasso.

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what steel is it?

 

and i take it you will etch it to show a hamon?

jared Z.

 

lilzee on britishblades.

 

From now on, ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put.

-Sir Winston Churchill

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hey everybody!

updated pics:

http://picasaweb.google.com/Knifemaker87/W2RecurveBowie1

 

fellow homstarian:

it is W2 steel and i will def take it to a hamon. i am actually going to use this blade as a test for the other one.. this one isnt quite where i would like it.. but i am going to take this one as nice as i can get it..

let me know what you think.

thanks

~chris

-Knifemaker-

MossKnives.jpg

http://knifemaker87.googlepages.com/home

 

Hamons are a painting; blades are a canvas, clay is my paint, fire is my brush. the problem is.. i am still painting like Pablo Picasso.

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hey chris. i much prefer the shape that turned out to the initial sketch - it just looks much more elegant. i'm sure you've thought of this, but just in case, when you come to do the bolsters, make sure you get them completely shaped and the fronts polished before you do any shaping on the handle - it's much easier to make wood conform to metal than the other way round. nice one.

Jake Cleland - Skye Knives

www.knifemaker.co.uk

"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."

"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."

 

Albert Einstein

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i'm sure you've thought of this, but just in case, when you come to do the bolsters, make sure you get them completely shaped and the fronts polished before you do any shaping on the handle - it's much easier to make wood conform to metal than the other way round. nice one.

 

Hey,

thanks for the advice. i actually had just finished the rough shaping when i came in and saw this. updated picture here:

http://picasaweb.google.com/Knifemaker87/W2RecurveBowie1

we will see how it turns out, but i used wraught iron for the bloster.. i am going to finish the shaping, and do the file-work on the bolster tommorow.. maybe even finish it.

 

and i totally agree about the shape. i just wasnt able to capture the right shape in the drawing. i was gonna try and elongate the blade.. but it was hard to portray.

 

the bolsters and slabs both are attatched with hidden pins. my first attempt.

 

comments are appreciated.

thanks!

~chris

-Knifemaker-

MossKnives.jpg

http://knifemaker87.googlepages.com/home

 

Hamons are a painting; blades are a canvas, clay is my paint, fire is my brush. the problem is.. i am still painting like Pablo Picasso.

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Oh that's coming along $%^in' sweet, great work Chris.

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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I just finished it. (more or less)

better picture soon, but the ones i have are here:

http://picasaweb.google.com/Knifemaker87/W2RecurveBowie1

comments are appreciated... especially critique

thanks!

~chris

-Knifemaker-

MossKnives.jpg

http://knifemaker87.googlepages.com/home

 

Hamons are a painting; blades are a canvas, clay is my paint, fire is my brush. the problem is.. i am still painting like Pablo Picasso.

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I just finished it. (more or less)

better picture soon, but the ones i have are here:

http://picasaweb.google.com/Knifemaker87/W2RecurveBowie1

comments are appreciated... especially critique

thanks!

~chris

 

man, you make me sick. that is gorgeous. the bolsters and the wood fit perfectly. my one suggestion is that if it were mine id polish out the oxides from the etch to brighten the habuchi and tone down the heavy contrast in the hamon - i think the dark oxides detract from the lines a little, but that is stunning work. damn, i was feeling quite pleased with myself today, but now i see i've just been footering around. any plans for a sheath?

Jake Cleland - Skye Knives

www.knifemaker.co.uk

"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."

"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."

 

Albert Einstein

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