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KGeiser

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hello, my name is Kris

I live in Carson City Nevada about 30 minutes south on Reno, i have been reading as many posts between homework and work as i can and i am pretty stoked at starting soon, i just wanted to know if there was anyone around my area that has already started forging by chance so i might be able watch, and find out if there is anywhere local that i might be able to find some scrap to pound on or for an anvil, or even if there is osmewhere local i can get tools, so far im leaning towards a charcoal forge but im not set yet i do know that im not goin for a propane forge though, i cant stand the smell, i have the $50 knifeshop book by Wayne Goddard, How to Make Knives by Pichard Barney and Rober Loveless, and a traditional techniques book by Donald Streeter all 3 of those book i am currently working my way through and wanted to know if there was anything else anyoen could add thank you for you time and input

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Both charcoal and propane have their limitations. Propane is cleaner and better for welding and the fire is easier to get the way you want it. By the way, I agree strongly with Mike, if you smell propane after you get you fire started then you need to shut down and look for gas leaks. Use soapy water, not a match. Charcoal takes more fire tending to keep it the way you want it, it is dirtier, and the fuel is harder to come by the year around. Now that I'm using a blown burner for my gas forge, charcoal is also more expensive. Charcoal, or really any solid fuel, is much more flexable. Depending on your forge design, the fire can be made small to heat just one area of the blade or larger to heat a larger area of the blade. Where it really shines is being able to heat just the middle of the blade. Because a charcoal forge is open rather than enclosed like a propane forge is, it can be used on irregular shapes that might not be able to fit into the fire chamber of a gas forge. This is important when it comes to making some styles of axes or making some of your own forging tools. I actually have and use both, though I do have to say that I am partial to charcoal.

 

Talking about smell, your neighbors may like propane over charcoal. Charcoal does put the smell of burning wood in the air where, properly run, a propane forge is odorless. It might make you unpopular in the neighborhood if you burn your charcoal forge when they have their laundry on the line. Whichever you use, remember that you have to have good ventilation. Both types of forges absolutely gush carbon monoxide when tuned to produce minimal scaling.

 

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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i figured if there was a smell during the burning of the forge then there might be a danger in it but i meant the smell of filling the tanks and carrying them etc, i live on an acre plot of land so my neighbors wont be close but ill still ask them during the summer i suppose that would be the only way to go about it

Edited by KGeiser
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Make them something, little "s" hooks to hang plants are easy to forge out of mild steel and are a good way to work on forging techniques as well as buying some goodwill. :) My neighbors all have bunches of hooks and fire pokers. One of my neighbors will come over to watch and he keeps asking "how do you learn to do that kind of stuff" I offer him the hammer but he says he can't do that kind of stuff, ah well, "can't never could and won't never will."

 

Welcome to the forums and a very addictive hobby/avocation.

 

Will

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I'm just far away from you to be of little to no use :lol:. About 3 1/2 hrs. away over in Santa Rosa. But, I'm a newguy too and I doubt you could learn much from me :). Right now I'm using a charcoal forge with pretty good results. With a handcranked blower I can easily reach welding temps, but it does take some work and thought to manage the fire so it works efficiently. One thing that does for me, though, is it forces me to slow down and think things through before I tackle it. I'm of the belief from my experience in other arts, that there is value in learning a skill using old school methods. That said, I am going to be building a propane forge soon to use as a dedicated welding forge.

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sounds alot like what my dad always said when i was little,, maybe its just the nestalgia of it, im an engineering student in college, but the more classes i take about engineering the more i learn that i wont be able to build what i design, and i hope that smithing will give me the sense of pride that anyone feels once they've built something from nothing

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