Jump to content

Recommended Posts

This may seem like a silly question but I was thinking about this the other day and realized that I'm not absolutely sure.

 

I have some fairly decent stock that I would like to make a few axes from. This would obviously mean I will be making my first welds and I need too know how and when to flux. I know that the surfaces must be clean and free of scale etc. Do I then heat the steel up, dip it in the flux, or maybe pour it over the weld area? Do I begin the weld and the slowly add flux to prevent oxidation? :unsure:

 

Your help would once again be greatly appreciated.

 

Regards

wayne

Link to post
Share on other sites

hi mate you get the parts red hot sprinkel the Borax on both parts to be welded keep heating till you see the Borax run and bubble like hot butter then pull out and weld hammer them Quickly medium blows at first followed by heavier till they are welded if they dont take fully clean them up and re do the heat and Borax you dont need to seperate them if they are partialy welded just re do the heat and borax leave the thin edges till last as this can cause the main weld to seperate

 

hope this is some help

 

tell :)

Edited by tell
Link to post
Share on other sites

As stated above, but after getting to red heat (or a little over) clean the scale off with a wire brush, then use the borax and reheat. Everything else from the above post should get you there.

 

Are you using coal or gas? If you are using coal then you definetly need to use the wire brush to clean of the little bit of scale that will form from heating it. If it is gas then there might not be that much scaling to clean off, but it wouldn't hurt to wire brush it a few quick times.

Link to post
Share on other sites

And one final word of advise: no matter what you do, some spring steels like 5160 and 9260 do not seem to like to stick to themselves. I can weld them to other steels, but not to themselves.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wayne, forgot to mention this earlier but here is a safety note.

 

Never allow people to stand around and watch when you are forge welding. the borax forms globs of stuff like molten glass that when you hit to make the weld it will squirt out in almost all directions. The stuff is very hot and will burn you so you might want to think about a leather apron if you don't already wear one.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Wayne, forgot to mention this earlier but here is a safety note.

 

Never allow people to stand around and watch when you are forge welding. the borax forms globs of stuff like molten glass that when you hit to make the weld it will squirt out in almost all directions. The stuff is very hot and will burn you so you might want to think about a leather apron if you don't already wear one.

 

Got some of that on my head once....i kept hammering 'til hte heat was gone, 'tho. And the billet was still useless.

Aw, well, well.

 

 

And one final word of advise: no matter what you do, some spring steels like 5160 and 9260 do not seem to like to stick to themselves. I can weld them to other steels, but not to themselves.

 

'S cos of the chromium, isn't it? A shim is in order...

 

Wayne, you're better off with too much flux than too too little, but if you're using solid fuel (you use charcoal, don't you?) then it's likely to make clinkers.

Edited by Nick Steele
Link to post
Share on other sites
'S cos of the chromium, isn't it? A shim is in order...

 

When I was first shown how to make tools like axes and the like, my teacher used 1018 for the body and after the eye weld, he forge welded a piece of 5160 (leaf spring, no doubt) between the sandwiched ends to form the core of the cutting surface. It's worked well for me thus far.

 

Wayne, you're better off with too much flux than too too little, but if you're using solid fuel (you use charcoal, don't you?) then it's likely to make clinkers.

 

It bares mentioning that if you have clinkers in your forge, your welds may turn out bad, if they'll weld at all. Clinkers often give off bad gasses that interfere with forge welding. If you're planning on making an axe, I'd start the day by completely cleaning out the forge and making sure there's no trace of clinker. As Nick said, the flux itself is likely to cause clinkers as well, so I'd probably re-clean the forge the day after any serious amount of fluxing has taken place. If you do a lot of welding, it may be neccisery to turn off the forge, clean it out and rebuild the fire a few times during the day.

Link to post
Share on other sites
When I was first shown how to make tools like axes and the like, my teacher used 1018 for the body and after the eye weld, he forge welded a piece of 5160 (leaf spring, no doubt) between the sandwiched ends to form the core of the cutting surface. It's worked well for me thus far.

 

 

That's what I do too. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Guys !

Donald couldn't be more right about safety : after my first setting hit on my last welding, i had a big blob of melted Borax land on my hand, of course i had neglected to put gloves on. And of course the more you fight to remove it, the more it spreads... :)

 

That is good and sound advice !

Steven

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the the information guys. I will be purchasing some borax in the next few days and I am hoping to knock out a few interesting things with it. I am miles away from Damascus, but I really want to do some san mai blades and axes.

 

Thanks also for the heads-up on the borax squirting around. I do not have a leather apron, but will get one before trying this. I prefer if no-one watches me anyway.

 

My forge runs on charcoal.

 

Can someone tell me what a "clinker" is. I am assuming that it's what is left in the forge when fluxing, kind of like the "clinker" you get after burning coal?

 

Thanks again guys. I am very busy at the grinder and files right now, and won't be forging for a few weeks. I will keep you posted on my success with the foge welding as soon as I fire up the forge again.

 

Regards

Wayne

Link to post
Share on other sites

Clinker is pretty much any material in the forge that's not fire, fuel or the material you're working. Molten flux mixes with ash, coal powders, scale from your blade and any of a hundred other things and forms a solid chunk. Often times, especially with the use of coal, bad gases are given off as the clinker heats, which makes welding difficult. A more immediate problem, however, is that clinkers tend to form in the bottom of your forge, which is usually the place where the air comes in at. This means that clinkers can block your air flow, and it's been my experience that they also tend to form in your air pipe under the firepot itself. This can mean a great deal of time lost to cooling down your forge and cleaning out the pipes if you don't have a clinker breaker installed (just a bar with a handle that runs through the pipe and can be twisted to break clinkers small enough that they fall out the bottom).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Considering the environment in which coal forms, it's not surprising at all to think that some sand would get into it. A clinker's made of all the unburnable stuff that's gummed together, and (alledgedly, i've never had one. The closest i've ever had i melted and twists nails near my tuyere) look like black glass, and go "clink" when you poke them.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...