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My Mini Hydraulic Press


Thunder
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my press is up and running :) it seems to only squish the steel when it is yellowy-orange hot or hotter. Are yours the same or is my 20ton jack weak? I don't think it is my 7hp 80gallon 200psi compressor... I will put up some pics after I finnish painting it, I ran out of paint with only a little bit left.

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Sounds like you may have some air in your jack. Purge the system and top up the fluid and I'm betting your performance will increase. Your press should be able to move metal as long as there's some red in it. Doesn't have to be yellow hot to play with.

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You can get fluid at an auto parts store. ACE Hardware or probably Lowe's will have it too. Buy the smallest jug you can find because it won't take much. If you can't find the manual I'm sure you can find the instructions on line.

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I found the manual but it doesn't show where the oil filler plug is, it has an arrow pointing to the backside of the jack and nothing else, any ideas on where it is? would it be on the cylinder of on the air motor?

 

 

Found my answer, lots of good info here http://www.hyjacks.com/H7.HTM

Edited by JCWalker
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I thought I'd add my version of this great tool. So far mine is working great and has been a wonderful addition to my shop. It even helps with my everyday forging. I've got a few more things to patch up and I might even paint it. Thanks again for sharing this with us all!!!

MiniPress.jpg

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I am constantly amazed at the variations and interest in this little project.

JCWalker, Zsartell your presses look great.

 

Arioch, I am not aware of anyone who has added a pump, I would be concerned about pressure between this little jack and the pump. Also the cost, if you have to buy a pump and motor and fittings then you would defeat the major benefit of this press – low cost and small foot print - however if you already have the pump and motor, and connectors, and can verify the pressures, it might be workable - but be very, very, careful if you do.

T. A. Toler

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OK Y'all I am at the point of needing to Fab some dies

I have one piece of 2" mild steel round I was going to

cut in half to make one set. What flat sizes do y'all find

the most useful/effective? 2", 1.5", 1" ??

Anyone using patterned dies? Tapered dies?

Many Thanks

Tom So.Ga.

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I am constantly amazed at the variations and interest in this little project.

 

Yeah, I feel the same thing, always fun to see how anyone can do it a different way using different scrap :lol:

 

Well, have fun and post some resulting squished-steel :rolleyes:

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  • 1 month later...

i have a question for you folks using these presses......is it strong enough of a machine to punch hammer eyes in 2'' stock??? one heat ?2 ? in theory i should be able to use my powerhammer to that......but im thinking the control on the press would be more suited for that use.....ideas? suggestions...?

All these things shall love do unto you that you may know the secrets of your heart,and in that knowledge become a fragment of Life's heart...

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Well...here's my version...I had mine built by my welder as I only have a small arc welder (which I used on the dies) My cost was $150 for the completed frame and anvils, the jack was on sale at HF for 82.99 and the compressor was $125 (had a small pancake compressor that might have worked, but it leaks and is only a tiny tank. My new one is a 5 HP 29 gallon. Total spent: $350

 

I call it "Das Ram" ;o)

 

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Bruce B. Baker Jr.

MBK Co. (MoonBlade Knives)

www.mbkco.com

Fremont, NE 68025

Hand Forged Blades, Damascus Steel, Handmade Athames.

 

Email: talis at mbkco.com (at=@)

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Well done MBKCo. nice press.

 

Tom I have not had luck with tapered die sets, for blade bevels, this may be the fault of my small air compressor, or my designs I use 2" width minimum flat, my new press will have a much larger anvil and die set area, not yet finished, I am using 2" round cut in half for handle forming, be careful to press straight or it will twist. I have astigmatism and sometimes my straight presses are not straight. Hammer work to flatten areas that bulge. Havent tried patterns yet.

 

blacklionforge - I would think this press would hot punch 2" depends on total area, may have to use a coupe of dies to get correct diameter hole. I can hot cut, 1/2" plate, like butter, with a 5160 sharpened cutter..

 

Sorry for delay in answering.

T. A. Toler

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  • 3 weeks later...

Now that gave me an idea...I have an old side shaft 3.5 horse engine here, several old hydraulic pumps and a couple of old hydraulic rams off of a front end loader...oh the fun I'm going to have

1 in 5 people are muslims. What do you know about Islam?

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  • 4 weeks later...

Well guys I finally fired up the minipress today and I quickly found out why most folks weld a rest or support for the release rod. Man a foot control would be sweet too!! THANKS Thunder for sharing your design Ken Kelley for your advice and the many other generous folks on this forum and thanks Don

Tom

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi all - I thought I would post my version of the mini press. I took ideas from all the presses posted and added a few of my own. My base and uprights are made of 3" by 3" and 2" by 3" tubing. The anvils are 3" by 2" with 3" by 1/4" plate for the guides . The dies fit down into a recessed area and use pins to hold them in place. I boxed in the lower guide and added outside springs to speed things up. Thanks for all the great design work on these presses!

Steve :D

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Thanks to all participating in this thread it's been very cool,

Q,

How are the 20 tonne jacks holding up and which brands are you guys useing,

anyone plumped for the 35 tonne,

i was tempted till the info said 9-10 cfm,and my comp is only about 7-8cfm,

over here (20 tonne)they range from what looks like general Chinese import ones at £50-60 on up to sealey and draper at £250-350 for the same thing,

chuck, jacks in the ebay search UK and you'll see what i mean,

anyone notice theirs is the same but maybe a different sticker,?

appreciate any info on the good and bad,

cheers,best,

lee,

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Q, How are the 20 tonne jacks holding up and which brands are you guys useing,

anyone plumped for the 35 tonne, i was tempted till the info said 9-10 cfm,and my comp is only about 7-8cfm,

over here (20 tonne)they range from what looks like general Chinese import ones at £50-60 on up to sealey and draper at £250-350 for the same thing, chuck, jacks in the ebay search UK and you'll see what i mean,

anyone notice theirs is the same but maybe a different sticker,?

appreciate any info on the good and bad,

cheers,best,

lee,

 

The 20 ton Chinese air/hydraulic jack from Harbor Freight about 70-100 us dollars- seems to give good results.

Higher tonnage usually means slower speed on the up-stroke, which means less presses per heat.

Jacks may need to have air bled occasionally, but mine has stood up well.

We are all open to different ideas and if it works its good.

But 20 tons chinese made - seems to be a good compromise between price, power, and speed.

 

T. A. Toler

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  • 2 months later...

Just a quick question for some of you more experienced guys. Would it be possible to use two of the air hydraulic cylinders in parallel to double the power of the press or at least increase it by 10 tons? I'm not sure about the all the mechanics but it was a thought that came to my mind. A combination at 30 or 40 tons would put it near the power output of some of the big presses but would require a heavier frame.

 

Any thoughts about this?

Wes Peterson

 

www.wpbladesmith.com

Southeast Georgia

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Just a quick question for some of you more experienced guys. Would it be possible to use two of the air hydraulic cylinders in parallel to double the power of the press or at least increase it by 10 tons? I'm not sure about the all the mechanics but it was a thought that came to my mind. A combination at 30 or 40 tons would put it near the power output of some of the big presses but would require a heavier frame.

 

Any thoughts about this?

 

I have thought about this very concept a number of times.

 

Air lines could be manifold together and with enough air pressure and CFM that should be fairly easy to fabricate and get the cylinders to push up together.

 

Its the going down, that’s the problem.

The main problem for me was the release mechanism to get two cylinders down at the same time, it takes a little practice to get the release on one cylinder, releasing two manually, would slow down the process considerably, unless they were somehow connected so they could both be released in one operation.

 

I though about a lever that connected both releases at once, with a toggle system, but never worked out the mechanics.

 

If you can make it work it would be pretty cool and I guarantee the forum would love to see it happen.

 

T. A. Toler

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And what about purshasing a spare 'autoreciprocating pneumatic cylinder' and use it instead of the handle of the manual pump of the jack... That would mean twice the cfm but also twice the speed on the down stroke and with tough springs we could rise the cycle speed to the speed of the fully hydraulic presses :rolleyes:

It could be a cost saving way for those who have lots of cfm but no money to spend in pump, tank, motor, cylinder, hoses and fittings, fluid...

Nice pet MBKCo, and nice press Steve, have fun ;)

Edited by Madmike
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