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My Mini Hydraulic Press


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is there any chance of getting a copy of the designs for this??

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I though a few of you might enjoy this little project. here is a graphic of my mini press, (the beer is unopend and for scale):   I can get about 5-6 crunchs from one billet heat. Cost about 70.0

I used 1/4" wall 2" x 2" for the uprights. I would think that you would want to go with 1/4" wall. 20 ton is a lot of pressure. 2" x 2" will also give you a little more surface area (hammer & anvi

laughing, thanks wish I got a commission.

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I though about a lever that connected both releases at once, with a toggle system...

You could also use a guided trammel with a spring return to rotate two gears on the release screws of the jacks :rolleyes:

And with few teeth count gears the releases could rotate a whole revolution or more on a short trammel stroke...

I use the head of an angle grinder to transmit the motion between my release handle and the screw of the jack, this way the handle is pointing at me with a 30° angle under the horizontal and when I rise it to +30° (75mm/3inches stroke) the screw rotates 1 turn.

And the jack retracts way faster than with half a turn or so...

To sum up, I think the toggle way is not the best, gears allow to increase the return stroke speed and so the whole cycle speed...

I think the main thing to improve on these little cuties is the cycling speed in order to work more on a single heat.

We've got enough squishing power to do some quite heavy work with 20T but the time lost reheating is just fuel and time consuming.

The biggest billet I'v welded in one bite was a bit over 5 pounds...

 

is there any chance of getting a copy of the designs for this??

 

Of what ? There are many pics and everyone has to make his own design with what's on the shelf or in the JY and by the way improve the overall design step by step with everyone's new ideas...

And mainly because it's so much fun :P

Edited by Madmike
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well, you see, i need like... schematics and stuff... cause i'm the special kind of stupid that thinks "i dont need a belt sander AND a grinder, i can just pop the big wheel off my 272 and stick the grinder wheel on it". and i tend to leave out important things. like, you know, grounds. and bolts that really should have been there.

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is there any chance of getting a copy of the designs for this??

Look at page 2 of this thread, L Murdock has made a good drawing of the basic design. Others have posted dimensions. Almost everyone has modified and / or improved the design, use what you need.

I do have a web page that has some of the orginal construction information located at this link:

Mini hydraulic press

I hope this helps.

T.A. Toler

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Look at page 2 of this thread, L Murdock has made a good drawing of the basic design. Others have posted dimensions. Almost everyone has modified and / or improved the design, use what you need.

I do have a web page that has some of the orginal construction information located at this link:

Mini hydraulic press

I hope this helps.

T.A. Toler

 

thanks :)

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  • 4 weeks later...

Just out of curiosity, has anyone tried removing the pneumatic assembly on these jacks and tried direct driving the thing as though it were just a single-acting hydraulic cylinder? I'm considering this, but I can't find any information regarding the jacks operating pressure and plunger size.

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Just out of curiosity, has anyone tried removing the pneumatic assembly on these jacks and tried direct driving the thing as though it were just a single-acting hydraulic cylinder? I'm considering this, but I can't find any information regarding the jacks operating pressure and plunger size.

 

I haven’t.

I cant remember anyone posting how to achieve this conversion.

But if you can figure out how to do it,

I am sure we would all love to see it done.

 

I will look when I get home tonight and see if I have any information on pressure etc, it may be on the instructions that came with the jack.

 

TA TOLER

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I've been looking at the manual for the HF 30ton, and with the diagram they give it would be feasible. I'm just not sure what sort of pressure these work at. Any idea what the cylinder bore is on that 25ton? If I knew the piston bore I can extrapolate working pressure from load rating. If its 4000psi or less I might be able to try this conversion.

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I've been looking at the manual for the HF 30ton, and with the diagram they give it would be feasible. I'm just not sure what sort of pressure these work at. Any idea what the cylinder bore is on that 25ton? If I knew the piston bore I can extrapolate working pressure from load rating. If its 4000psi or less I might be able to try this conversion.

 

Try one of these, I havent read them yet

20 ton air/Hyd.

http://www.harborfreight.com/manuals/95000-95999/95553.pdf

 

manual jack - all

http://www.harborfreight.com/manuals/66000-66999/66450.pdf

 

TA Toler

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Try one of these, I havent read them yet

20 ton air/Hyd.

http://www.harborfre...95999/95553.pdf

 

manual jack - all

http://www.harborfre...66999/66450.pdf

 

TA Toler

 

Yeah. I was looking at that 30 since it is so cheap. if we are taking about direct driving then the pneumatics are just an extra cost. It really looks like it should work. Return speed would still be limited by the size of the internal ports and the strength of the return spring(s), but operation should be simplified alot. I suppose I could call them about operating pressure, but I doubt they will answer.

 

If this works out, it will be much cheaper than the cylinders people have been using.

As soon as I get some things worked out financially I'll give this a try.

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Well, after actually looking at it really hard, I noticed how little the piston is. That 30ton looks like its only using about a 2.5"-3" piston. So the pressure to get 30tons out of it would make a control vavle expensive.

 

So....nevermind. rolleyes.gif

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  • 4 months later...

Well, it's been about a year since I decided to make a Toler Mini Press. We finally got off our duffs and started putting it together. I couldn't have done it without the expert help of my son-in-law. He's a professional welder.

 

I wanted it beefy so we went with double 2X2 upright supports and a double 2X2 ram. The ram tubes are wrapped with 1/2 inch top and bottom. Most everything else is 1/2 inch. The bottom plate that the jack sits on is 5/8's only because I had it laying around.

 

We still have some work to do like the upper brakets for the upper die's and the support for the air switch and of course a selection of different die's.

 

It works great and was fun to build. It's heavy as hell. I may need to get an engine puller just to move it around!

 

I've attached a picture of it almost completed.

 

Thanks to Thunder and everyone else on the thread.

ArtMini Press2.jpg

Edited by Art Lawrence
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  • 3 months later...

Welcome in the pffft pffft pffft squeeze club Art, a lovely little press you made ;)

Just one thing I'd like to say to you all members of the club, take off those ridiculously small hoses and valve and replace them by way larger, the cylinder is suffocating and won't have a decent speed as it comes, on mine you can't hear the pffft-pffft, it's a continuous vibrating noise and it goes way faster than all the presses I saw on Youtube ;)

And don't forget to double the back-stroke springs, it speeds up the cycle ;)

Edit: the picture of mine on the first page is an old one...

Edited by Madmike
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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

I've read this thread 3 times now and decided this is definitly a piece of equipment I need. It will solve a lot of problems that I have with building a big press.

 

I found a company in the Netherlands that sells the 20 ton jack, they also sell the 30 ton variant with springs. I was wondering if anyone tried this type? I question the downward movement will be fast enough.

 

potkrik.jpg

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Has anybody had problems with their jack's air motor ?

I built a C frame press with a foot control that actuates a Mac valve that sends air to both the motor and a rotary actuator.

When I press on the foot control it closes the jack screw and the motor pumps the jack.

I cycle hundreds of times in a forging session.

I have gone through 2 jacks now and was wondering if anyone else has had any problems with their air motor on the jack?

Good thing I bought the replacement plan for 5 bucks.

Thanks

Steve

DSC02285.JPG

Edited by bronzetools
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I've read this thread 3 times now and decided this is definitly a piece of equipment I need. It will solve a lot of problems that I have with building a big press.

 

I found a company in the Netherlands that sells the 20 ton jack, they also sell the 30 ton variant with springs. I was wondering if anyone tried this type? I question the downward movement will be fast enough.

 

potkrik.jpg

 

This jack looks very similar to the motors we are using here in the USA, if it is fast enough or not - all depends on your expectations. It is after all - a mini hydraulic jack - it has limitations as compared to the full sized presses and it has advantages.

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This jack looks very similar to the motors we are using here in the USA, if it is fast enough or not - all depends on your expectations. It is after all - a mini hydraulic jack - it has limitations as compared to the full sized presses and it has advantages.

 

Thanks for the reply, I think I'll buy both types of jacks and see which will work best. As soon as I have something working I will post my results.

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Bronzetools:

I have not had any problems with my jack, It may be the C frame puts a different stress on the jack?.

T.A. Toler

Thunder,

I have set up my ram so I can stop the return travel by inserting a pin.

This makes for the optimum distance when I first approach the die with a hot billet.

A friend suggested that maybe since the ram is not fully retracting and I am using a short stroke that maybe the fluid is overheating.

The press hits pretty hard when I first start but it looses some power after a few hours of forging and the whole press is warm from the hot metal.

I even have a furnace blower fan directed on the press to help cool it.

I also installed an oiler to help lube the air motor .I don't think that would hurt.

Maybe I will replace the hydraulic oil in the jack with new fresh oil.

 

2 days ago I replaced my second jack when the air motor was slowing so much that it wouldn't putt-putt anymore.

I bought the replacement plan but it's getting to be a hassle changing the jack out in the middle of a forging session.

I guess I probably shouldn't mention I have been using the jack in a homemade press when I return it, they might call that improper use.

Otherwise this press works great.

The weight of the lower ram is such that it has a very fast return and the foot control make it really nice to use.

I typically will get set up and forge for 6 to 8 hrs.

 

I really appreciate your sharing your idea with everyone.

I have been able to do a lot of forging because of this press and who knows when I might have been able to afford a larger one.

Thanks again Thunder

Steve

DSC02286.JPG

DSC02287_2.jpg

Edited by bronzetools
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  • 4 weeks later...

I love this thread! Great contribution one and all!

 

I'm about to build one of these 'mini presses' but am curious about one aspect of the most common design. Why is the base typically constructed of short sections of square tubing? This seems an unnecessary expense. Wouldn't just using a 1/2' thick plate for the base work (or even 5/8" or 3/4")? Especially since most presses also seem to have plates on top or bottom or both. If bracing the uprights is a concern, wouldn't a few simple gusset braces work? I would think that this would also cut down on the weight and make the press more portable. If the concern is to keep the base from twisting or bending, adding a couple of stiffeners should be less expensive.

 

Again, just curiuos.

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I love this thread! Great contribution one and all!

 

I'm about to build one of these 'mini presses' but am curious about one aspect of the most common design. Why is the base typically constructed of short sections of square tubing? This seems an unnecessary expense. Wouldn't just using a 1/2' thick plate for the base work (or even 5/8" or 3/4")? Especially since most presses also seem to have plates on top or bottom or both. If bracing the uprights is a concern, wouldn't a few simple gusset braces work? I would think that this would also cut down on the weight and make the press more portable. If the concern is to keep the base from twisting or bending, adding a couple of stiffeners should be less expensive.

 

Again, just curiuos.

 

reefera4m

The original press was made from scrap that I had lying around my shop, that scrap happened to be 2” square tubing. You cannot tell from the graphics, but all of the tubing wasn’t even all the same wall thickness. The beauty of this press is what I presented and offered to the group was a concept; ever one that has made this press has added or subtracted their own ideas. Every press is just a little different, everyone trying their ideas and then presenting the ideas to the group and making the concept not mine but ours.

 

Try your ideas and then let us all know what you found out. Just remember - its little, but it still exerts 20 tons of pressure on the frame and components. Twenty tons is enough power to hurt you - really quick. I always make test runs on a new press before I get my face and body in harm’s way. Test the press then check your welds and determine if your bracing is deforming or moving off center. A bad weld or a frame that is not square will fail. I suggest stick welding; I don’t trust mig or wire welders they just do not seem to penetrate deep enough. Your experience may be different.

 

Good luck and tell us what you find.

 

T. A. Toler

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I have been following this thread for a while and some time ago, I was inspired to build my own press. Seeing it pop up again, I decided to post some pics of my version.

I all ready had a viking 30 ton shop press that had not been used in years. I modified this for the frame. I'm using a 20 ton jack and may go up to a 30 ton some time if this one ever fails. Its a HF deal.

 

I welded the lower support in place(mostly for stability), added some guides and then some upright guides later to keep it nice and straight. Took the release screw out, and welded a T handle to it. Put a control valve in a block of wood for foot control; a bit crude but it works. And here it is. I've made a few dies for the set up. I need to make a fullering die; right now I just lay a tire iron across the lower jaw and press it.

 

I haven't used my set up extensively but am starting to more and more. Most of what I've done has been borrowed from this thread and ideas I've read here. If anyone sees room for improvement, I'm open to suggestions.

 

whole.JPGvalve.JPGrelease.JPGplate.JPGjaws.JPGguides.JPGdies.JPG

Edited by jarrett
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