Jump to content

making a tanto


Jziegenbein

Recommended Posts

here's a rough sketch of a little tanto i want to make, i'm wondering if there's anything i should change or add about it, because i ahven't made on before.

 

the blade is going to be 7" long, with a 4 1/2" long handle, i'm thinking the wood will e purple heart, the habaki will be copper, not sure what the spacers will be made of.

 

i darkened the lines a bit on photoshop, please forgive my ineptity at it. :unsure:

 

mooification.jpg

 

thanks, :D

jared Z.

 

lilzee on britishblades.

 

From now on, ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put.

-Sir Winston Churchill

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would say with that grind line/plunge cut your not going traditional(which is OK by Me) but I'd still raise up the shinogi/ridge line higher toward the spine. Maybe 2/3 of the way toward the spine. Beyond that I think it looks great!

 

Matt

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i might go for a convex grind instead of a flat, because i'm "grind angle challenged" but i see what you mean. thanks, :D

jared Z.

 

lilzee on britishblades.

 

From now on, ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put.

-Sir Winston Churchill

Link to comment
Share on other sites

as a rule of thumb id say the shinogi should be 1/3rd of the width of the blade, otherwise you'll have a heck of a time getting the thing sharp, especially with a convex grind. also i'd lose the plunge cut, its not traditional, breaks up the flow of the blade and makes the grind/polish unecessarily laborious. i'd also say your tsuka is maybe 1/2" too long to my eye, and you maybe want to consider a more forgiving wood than purple heart to carve tsuka and saya from, it does not like chisels in my experience. i like the blade shape, the kissaki in particular looks dead on, but i notice there's no sori - what steel/ heat treat were you considering? if you go for a hamon, sori is always a factor, though there are ways round it - you can pre curve, but thats hard to judge, you can make your blade over sized and re grind the profile after yakire, but that has it's own problems. i like to make a diamond section blade and harden the mune, or you can use oil.

 

good luck.

Jake Cleland - Skye Knives

www.knifemaker.co.uk

"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."

"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."

 

Albert Einstein

Link to comment
Share on other sites

forgive my ignorance, but i'm not sure what the tsuka, shinogi, saya, kissaki, and sori are. :unsure:

 

as for the purpleheart, that makes sense, i'm still in the very vague visioning stage, what wood do you recommend?

 

and as a still don't have a forge this one is going to be ground out, i'm going to use either 5160 or 1084. i think those are both oil hardening steels.

 

thanks for the input guys. :D

jared Z.

 

lilzee on britishblades.

 

From now on, ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put.

-Sir Winston Churchill

Link to comment
Share on other sites

forgive my ignorance, but i'm not sure what the tsuka, shinogi, saya, kissaki, and sori are. :unsure:

 

as for the purpleheart, that makes sense, i'm still in the very vague visioning stage, what wood do you recommend?

 

and as a still don't have a forge this one is going to be ground out, i'm going to use either 5160 or 1084. i think those are both oil hardening steels.

 

thanks for the input guys. :D

 

the tsuka is the handle, the saya is the sheath, the shinogi is the longitudinal ridge line, the kissaki is the tip from the start of the curve to the point, and sori is the curvature which is induced by differential hardening. 5160 is definately an oil quench steel, and is very hard to get to show a hamon. 1084 can be quenched in oil or water, and will show a hamon if properly normalised and clay coated, and is definately your best bet for a tanto. if you quench in water you increase your chances of cracking by about an order of magnitude, but in oil you'll be hard pushed to get a very active hamon, and the blade will tend to curve down a bit, though not as much as it'll curve up in water.

 

as for wood, ho, or japanese magnolia is traditional. i don't know if american magnolia is at all similar. plenty of people use poplar, and i've used walnut and plane, and scott slobodian uses maple and beech a lot. the first saya i made was from purple heart, and it was a nightmare, but if i was to do it again, i would split the piece into three, and saw out the blade shape from the centre one, then glue it back together, instead of the traditional way of cutting it into two and carving out the blade shape from each side with chisels.

Edited by jake cleland

Jake Cleland - Skye Knives

www.knifemaker.co.uk

"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."

"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."

 

Albert Einstein

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks, i'm new to the world of japanese knifey-words. the thing is, i've got a peice of steel i got from the baston knife show, but the person who gave it to me didn't know if it was 5160 or 1084. because he bought 2 packs of steel. so i'm just going to play it safe and oil quench then.

 

do you think that walnut would chisel well for the tsuka and saya?

 

 

thanks :D

jared Z.

 

lilzee on britishblades.

 

From now on, ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put.

-Sir Winston Churchill

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks, i'm new to the world of japanese knifey-words. the thing is, i've got a peice of steel i got from the baston knife show, but the person who gave it to me didn't know if it was 5160 or 1084. because he bought 2 packs of steel. so i'm just going to play it safe and oil quench then.

 

do you think that walnut would chisel well for the tsuka and saya?

 

 

thanks :D

 

I've not made any Japanese type handles or other fittings, but I am an experienced woodworker, and walnut is a delight to work with hand tools.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...