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  2. Mike Andersson

    More heat

    venturi forge? Is that the name of a two burner model? It's made by majestic forge and it's called the knife makers model. It's the same as the ones they use on forged in fire only one less burner.
  3. Today
  4. Eric Morgan

    Kitchen knives

    Nice!
  5. Mike Ward

    Kitchen knives

    Thank you!
  6. Jeremy Blohm

    Tong obsession.

    https://youtu.be/NyVVuWp7e_U
  7. Jeremy Blohm

    Cutler's anvil

    There is some nice stake anvils in there also. Man you got a lot of tooling with that baby!!!
  8. Stephen Stumbo

    Chef's knife - Bronze and ironwood

    Most recent knife. Custom chefs knife. 1080 steel, 60 Rockwell. Ironwood scales, bronze bolsters, and SS pins.
  9. Conner Michaux

    Burning in a tang?

    Okay, thanks!
  10. Joël Mercier

    Kitchen knives

    Nice work Mike
  11. Jerrod Miller

    Burning in a tang?

    This is one of those things that some makers will swear by, and others swear against. I will say that I have found it to be more difficult that I would have thought, but seems fine otherwise. I'd definitely plan on scraping (broach) the inside a bit after burning.
  12. Jerrod Miller

    More heat

    Since that appears to be a venturi forge, I'd say start by blocking the doors a bit less. Back pressure is no good for venturi.
  13. Mike Ward

    Kitchen knives

    Got these finished up and razor sharp. The matching ones are for me and the other is for my dad. All are out of 80crv2 with a mustard patina. The darker woods are Wenge and the other is Cocobolo with copper pins. I finished the handles with coats of mineral oil and Howard’s Butcher Block oil. Didn’t really want to go with wipe on poly and if it’s good enough for cutting boards it should be fine for handles. I used a strip of maple to make the tang slot on the chefs knife.
  14. jake pogrebinsky

    Practicing the bearded axe

    Yet another variant,(Possibly),would be a corner Skew-weld. Here's a link to where Peter Ross uses it to accumulate a huge mass at the corner. https://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/that’s-not-a-holdfast/ (to an object itself,though i've seen a video of him actually Doing it but can no longer find it). This is an interesting deal as the orientation of the grain around-about the weld area is quite different from other types of welds.
  15. Yesterday
  16. Conner Michaux

    Burning in a tang?

    I want to try burning the tang into the handle with the knife i'm currently working on, Good or bad idea? I would drill 2-3 holes to make a guide hole, Then I would clamp the knife in a vice and use a plumbers torch to heat the tang to a dull red and push the handle into it, and tap it with a mallet, Does this sound like it would work?
  17. Mike Andersson

    More heat

    I am having some trouble getting my two burner majestic forge up to forge welding heat. I have fire brick closing all of one side except a small slice and the other side closed off so the opening is just big enough to get the work piece inside. I have the valves cranked on high and I can let the piece sit there for 15 minutes even after I have been heating and beating the piece for over 45 minutes. So the forge is heated and working great but I just can't get it to welding heat. Any tips? Do I need buy one with more burners to get to this heat?
  18. Gary Mulkey

    Meteorite Damascus

    I got the remainder of the flowers shaped & ready for welding today. I hope that these pics explain my process. I'm going to take some time off from the shop for a while. I'll try to keep you updated in a week or so as I progress with this one.
  19. Gerald Boggs

    Practicing the bearded axe

    Just to be clear, no way was I trying to do historical methods, I just liked the challenge :-)
  20. Alan Longmire

    Practicing the bearded axe

    I suspect welding is easier, at least it is for me. The economics of upsetting, especially on a stone anvil or tiny iron anvil, do seem as though it would be more involved. But, if you don't have the extra steel lying around, you do what you must.
  21. Alan Longmire

    Practicing the bearded axe

    Yes indeed.
  22. Dan P.

    Cutler's anvil

    I will try and remember to do that. Seems both male and female dovetails are tapered. The male dovetail in the tooling is minimal, and seems to have been made rough and ready in house, though I can't quite work out how yet.
  23. Zeb Camper

    Metals for sale (might be more to come)

    Wouldn't you know it? My micrometer was positioned directly under a leak in the roof. I gotta go buy another
  24. Gerald Boggs

    Practicing the bearded axe

    Are those the ones you have a post showing the process?
  25. jake pogrebinsky

    Practicing the bearded axe

    Thanks for that fantastic post,Alan,most informative,All kinds of info... Hear you on degree of refinement of material,i remember years ago Bogdan has warned me against using anything But very refined stuff... However,in the old J.A. "Viking Axe" topic,at the very end,remember those photos of scrubbed/etched Baltic job? It's probable that the methods changed depending on ore,skill-level,fuel availability,likely...Also the ethnic factor,geographically,design itself probably Germanic,then practiced by vikings who took it further north and East,completely different circumstances There... (is it more economical to make a weld,or go through a Number of upsetting heats?Upsetting takes nearly a welding heat...(but i struggle with upsetting more than any other process,welding included,but it's just me..) Fantastic forensics though,thanks a bunch to you and Chris...
  26. Doug Lester

    Cutler's anvil

    Wow! It looks like you have at least 6 guillotine tools in that lot plus that set of dies for making a spiral textured handle looks interesting. That's a lot more than a cutlers anvil. Doug
  27. Alan Longmire

    Practicing the bearded axe

    Chris Price has an original bearded axe from Lithuania or somewhere in the Viking-travelled Baltic regions. In the interests of science we sandblasted it to see the grain and spark-tested the edge and the bottom of the eye. The grain showed it was made with an asymmetric weld for the eye, much like Jim Austen's method, and the beard was formed via a 90 degree upset square corner, and the whole fullered and drawn down. I have tried a few that way, but without the success you have there. Mostly due to poor starting material size choice, and as I was pressed for time I used a different method for the production run. Still lots of upsetting and fullering work, though. And hooking the beard under and over the horn is a most satisfactory way to get things going. The (very gentle) spark test showed the whole head was a medium-carbon steel. Sparked like 1045, yet had the distinctive grain of well-refined wrought. This suggests it was made from natural bloom steel rather than hearth steel or carburized iron. The beard showed traces of quenching as well. Pity we didn't have access to a metallurgical microscope (much less the skill to use one or interpret the results). I suggested sectioning it, then polishing and etching, to which Chris wisely replied "Get your own, this one is staying in one piece." My solution ended up to be starting with seven inches of 1" square, upsetting it to 6 inches by 3/4" by 2 inches to start the beard (leaving the eye area at 1" square), then slitting and drifting the eye, forging the langets down over a mandrel, further refining of the beard, then using Jim Austen's method of steeling the edge. I was still never thrilled with the overall proportions, but the customer was happy. 16 of the buggers...
  28. Jeremy Blohm

    Cutler's anvil

    WOW........jealousy is an understatement. The best part is you have tooling for the anvil. I need to make some tooling for my anvil. I just don't know how to go about making the dovetail. I know its probably easier than I think. Would it be possible to get a picture of one of the toolings dovetail to get an idea of how to go about it?
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