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  1. Past hour
  2. J.Browne

    Workshop setup.

    After a rather long break from knife making due too life and other priorities getting in the way I’m finally setting up all my gear again. However over my time off I have developed an elbow injury, a bone spur in my right elbow that is causing all sorts of grief. I have full function but reduced strength and it’s ok-ish most of the time, if I’m mindful of technique and ergonomics of tooling. But that has been a trial and error process with mixed results. So I’m looking for a little advice on things like bench heights, grinder heights etc from people who have munted elbows.... cheers.
  3. Today
  4. Shane Savage

    how to balance a knife

    Thanks guys, very helpful response i appreciate it =D i will give the coin one a go
  5. Yesterday
  6. Alan Longmire

    A few hours on the forge this morning

    Yeah, one tap with a hammer will fix that.
  7. Conner Michaux

    Puukko-ish WIP

    Sanded all the gunk off the blade and tang, I’m going to work on making a broach until the handle material arrives. 600 grit finish gets scratched so easily I’ve just had it in my pocket for a few hours and it’s already got a few little marks on it.
  8. Charles du Preez

    Thought fer the day, / add yours if you like

    I wish somebody would call me ‘sir’ without adding ‘can you please stop doing that, sir’
  9. Alex Middleton

    how to balance a knife

    Another trick if you don't have the clay is to tape coins to the end of the handle until you get the balance you are looking for.
  10. SteveShimanek

    A few hours on the forge this morning

    Blacksmith say 10 minutes forging beats 1/2 hour of grinding.
  11. Charles du Preez

    San Mai and Koa vest Bowie.

    Good work all round there Steve. I like her a lot.
  12. AndrewB

    A few hours on the forge this morning

    I tried knocking it back to straight it just didn't want to cooperate. Its not that the entire blade is wavy its just the blade edge that buldges out a bit right before the ricasso. Thats mainly what I was trying to work out is attempting a forged ricasso on that one. So the blade edge at one point actually was further out towards the tang than at the tip. But that's fixable with the grinder.
  13. SteveShimanek

    [Picture Hvy] Some of my Orishigane for Japanese Blades.

    Lots of good work there.
  14. Alan Longmire

    Puukko-ish WIP

    Make one.
  15. Joshua States

    [Picture Hvy] Some of my Orishigane for Japanese Blades.

    What? No house elves? Looks great Daniel.
  16. Cason Hicks

    First knife attempt... Tanto

    Thanks, Alan. The bar was not branded, unfortunately. I would have seen the brand while grinding down the stock to flatten it. Definitely wasn't octagonal, more of a rectangle with rounded ends (__________) imagine that with a top line as well. I had to grind the sides flat/square to become the edge and spine. It seemed to harden well, as a file skated nicely off of the edge but not the tang (unhardened).
  17. Conner Michaux

    Puukko-ish WIP

    Are there any websites I can buy a Broach for hidden tangs, Or do I have to make one?
  18. AJ Chalifoux

    how to balance a knife

    For something that size, you may not necessarily need one, depending on distal taper (if there is any). If you feel it needs one, Dave's (and Peter's) information is fantastic. A good trick is to get some modeling clay and a kitchen scale. Mark out on the tang where the top and bottom of the pommel will sit and build up the modeling clay between those two points to mock up a tang. Remember to stay within the lines you set for yourself, as moving mass further up or down the tang will change things drastically. Play with a bunch of different weights until it has the dynamics you're looking for, then weigh the clay. You now know the weight you want for the pommel.
  19. Daniel W

    A few hours on the forge this morning

    Good work on the tang. Why grind out that wavy bit? Next time at the forge with this, take that wavy bit and knock it back. If you heat up that spot where the wave begins at the tang, put the spine of the knife on the flat of the anvil where the wave bows up. Tap that bow down flush to the anvil. If you're edge is thin this may make a little fold over, but if it's 1/8 thick you should be fine. That will take out a lot of that waviness.
  20. AndrewB

    A few hours on the forge this morning

    that is very true lol. I was just glad I didn't burn off the tang.
  21. Conner Michaux

    Americas iron giant's!!!

    Wow 50,000 tons.... Honestly I think it would be terrifying working right next to that thing, and the forges needed to heat up the huge chunks of steel.
  22. Daniel W

    Practicing the bearded axe

    Yeah I've drowned myself with the last two attempts in steel. Too much of chasing after that shape when I could have made something functional/successful if I just did something simpler. On the wrapped axes I've failed on, 1 I broke the weld when trying to weld in the bit, 2nd one failed in the final drift to true things up. My trouble lays in the welding and I know it, either not working at the right heat after the weld, or just not enough welding passes in general for proper fusion. The last few forge weld's I've done, I let them fully cool, and I broke them to see if I could tell what one of 3 steps I'm doing wrong. Although when cold the un-welded sections bent away first, the attempted weld popped soon after. The surface felt a little like very fine sandpaper but was very bright in color. I've thought about using some 1/4 x 1in and folding it over for welding practice. Maybe I can make a tiny axe during the practice.
  23. Brian Dougherty

    A few hours on the forge this morning

    Good progress! Now, rather than go at that with a grinder, study it for a while. Use the OCD to your advantage. Decide what could be improved with more forging time, and make a list of improvements to be made. For each item on that list, make a plan of attack for how you would accomplish it. (It's much easier to do this holding on to the cold steel in the comfort of your living room than when standing at the anvil) The next time you decide to fire up the forge, take this blade out and try to knock off at least one thing on the list.
  24. I'm out of coal I can use to just forge until next month at least. But I went out there with an idea in my head. It's not perfect perfect heck even the blade edge isn't perfect but I plan on grinding that wavy junk out with the belt sander. How ever with the hidden tang I am quite happy with the way that turned out. Its the first one I've been able to make with out the steel getting too hot and melting down into the forge right in front of me. I did normalize it before I pulled it out of the fire. I didn't want you guys to think I was giving up on knives its just frustrating at times to get what I want and how I want it to look. Its just a bit of the OCD that I have LOL. The tang actually extends about 5 inches or so further down I'll get a couple more shots of it later on after every things cooled off from normalizing. But at least I'm getting better at making these hidden tang things LOL.
  25. Alan Longmire

    Buffalo Forge Blower

  26. Alan Longmire

    Buffalo Forge Blower

    In good shape they go for $100 - $150. Usually they can be freed up with a little soak in kerosene or something similar to dissolve the congealed goo. I use one that was totally locked up after spending 25 years as a lawn ornament. A few shots of PB B'laster and some degreaser and it works good as new. The key to remember with these things is DO NOT try to take the gearbox apart. The lid comes off, and you can open the fan housing if you need to to straighten or replace the vanes. Take the lid off and check for broken gears/missing teeth. Broken gears are the death knell, they can't be replaced. If the gears look okay, once you have all the old crud soaked off give it a spin. Use plenty of degreaser and penetrant in the bearings, they are not sealed and will need the old oil goo blasted out. Most of these have a bolt that takes up the slack in the main shaft, make sure this is not too tight. They also have a direction they prefer to turn after years of use, this is easy to figure out. If you need a new counterweight for the crank handle those are easy enough to make. Finally, once you have it free, fill the crankcase to just above the bottom of the lowermost gear with the lightest motor oil or power steering fluid you can find. Do not use gear oil, that's way too heavy. The oil rides the teeth up the gear train and splashes on the other gears, then runs out the bearings front and back. What they call a total loss lubricating system. Keeps the bearings free by washing out any grit that gets in. I love mine and wouldn't switch it out for an electric blower for anything. They make fine control of heat and forge atmosphere easy, plus they give your left hand something to do and force you to stay by the forge so it's less likely you'll burn something up. They also use less fuel than electric blowers since they stop when you let go. Somewhere around here there are pictures of mine, a Lancaster #1. If I can find the thread I'll post a link.
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