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  1. Today
  2. Clifford Brewer

    Bronze Style Short Sword

  3. Aiden CC

    Puukko-ish WIP

    Burnishing could be a good option. The general idea is to raise "whiskers" on the surface of the wood, then remove them. My personal method is to wet the wood, dry it with a hairdryer, then scrub it with steel wool. I repeat that until the surface of the wood stays smooth when it gets wet. When oiled, this makes for a fairly glossy finish.
  4. Joshua States

    This almost killed me

    Oh Yeah. I saw the demo in Salt Lake and watched his DVD several times. Something about your tutorial made me think it was the easier way to go when learning, probably the symmetry. I made all the tools he has in the video except those top & bottom fullers. I have a 25# LG hammer that I can do single strikes with, so it acts more like a treadle or drop hammer. I figured that if I needed to replicate his forging technique, I'd have a way to do it without having to ask my wife to be a striker!. I also made something to replicate your radiused anvil edge, because I don't have an anvil with nicely radiused edges......1-1/2" square stock I didn't think the process itself was difficult to understand or systematically approach. It was just a lot of hard forging and I'm not doing this every day. As a matter of fact, I don't even forge once a week. Taking a whole day and spending it turning some O-1 drill rod into a Bowie and doing this axe pretty much all by hand, was a bit of a workout.
  5. Jeremy Blohm

    What did you do in your shop today?

    Acetone it again and etch for another 10 minutes. Repeat until your satisfied.
  6. Greg R

    Finished my forge

    Here is some video of it running. feedback appreciated 813D6CB9-1AE2-4063-BDD0-050A3D15496D.MOV
  7. Conner Michaux

    What did you do in your shop today?

    Etched the puukko, and it looks awful.... a de-greased it with actetone before I etched and after it etched I sprayed it with windex and scrubbed it down with steel wool. Forgot to mention, I etched it for over 10 mins.
  8. Gerald Boggs

    This almost killed me

    Have you had the chance to watch Jim demo the axe or have the dvd? He has some nice steps that help the process go a bit smoother.
  9. Yesterday
  10. Conner Michaux

    What did you do in your shop today?

    Just bought a canopy today, it’s 10x16 with the side panel flap thing up, this will cover my forging area, so I can forge without the sun beating down on the anvil.
  11. Conner Michaux

    Puukko-ish WIP

    Finally the ferric arrived, found a quart of it for 20$ on Amazon. The bottle says it’s ready to use and it doesn’t need to be diluted, lots of reviews also said that, so I’m gonna go ahead and test etch the puukko.
  12. timgunn

    Finished my forge

    I don't know how much you've played with the burners yet, but it's worth choosing a fixed value for the gas pressure, letting the forge get to temperature, then making adjustments to the choke to see how that affects the temperature. Adjusting the choke should adjust the air:fuel ratio and with it the flame temperature. Adjusting the pressure should adjust the amount of flame you have. You'll adjust both in normal use, but it's worth spending half an hour or so early on just getting a feel for what does what. Maximum flame temperature is reached at an air:fuel ratio that is close to stoichiometric. It's hotter than we usually want/need (well above the melting point of Iron) and "we" tend to run more fuel-rich and cooler. Running fuel-rich means that there is a reducing atmosphere in the forge that tends to grab any Oxygen before it can react with the workpiece to form scale. The partially-burned gases finish burning when they reach Oxygen in the air outside the forge and this is what gives the Dragons Breath. It looks like you have a fair amount of adjustment available both ways. Opening the chokes should get the forge hotter, closing the chokes should make it cooler. A hotter flame should also get it to any given temperature faster.
  13. jake cleland

    Bronze Style Short Sword

    perfect...
  14. Zeb Camper

    This almost killed me

    Lil' cross peen action on er... I'm in love with this guy named "Tord Berglund" or something like that. He's on FB. Guy makes batches and batches of big ol' dane axes; prettiest I've seen. He welds the bit on in the traditional way where it is higher than the body of the axe. I wish he hung out here.
  15. Alan Longmire

    Bronze Style Short Sword

    Nicely done!
  16. Zeb Camper

    Bronze Style Short Sword

    Really like the handle!
  17. nsantella

    Bronze Style Short Sword

    Here was another odd ball project Iv partially finished up. I inherited a celtic leaf shaped blade roughed out from a leaf spring with a plasma cutter from a friend who was moving a while back. I forged it out to adjust the proportions and rough ground and heat treated it with a pretty minimal setup. It took a few kinks in hardening which mostly came out after clamping in the second temper. It just barely fit diagonally in my kitchen oven. I ground the convex fuller in with an angle grinder mostly after heat treating. The handle was carved in yew sap wood for the scales and heart wood for the pommel. Blade was rust browned to look very vaguely like bronze. At some point I want to do a matching russet steel sheath in a La Tene style, but that may take a while to get to. Hope someone finds it of interest.
  18. SteveShimanek

    What did you do in your shop today?

    Fired up the forge yesterday to make myself a dogleg chisel for working on Japanese scabbards (saya); going over to try to work on it some more today.
  19. Doug Lester

    Finished my forge

    Remember that color of the heated steel depends a lot on ambient lighting. Cherry red, which I've never seen in my forge, in bright light is probably a different temperature than cherry red appearing in subdued light after sun set. Doug
  20. Alan Longmire

    Meteorite Damascus

    I agree about the oval guard. Better flow.
  21. Alan Longmire

    Finished my forge

    From first lighting that is pretty good.
  22. Bruno

    Meteorite Damascus

    Dang! That's looks Great!
  23. Greg R

    Finished my forge

    the 6 minutes was from first lighting. I used a 2 inch ceramic blanket and cast o lite. I havent put in the ITC 100 yet but i am going to
  24. Eric Morgan

    What did you do in your shop today?

    Finished up on adding the horn to my homemade anvil this morning. There’s a bit of a waist where the welds are coming up the sides, but with a 3/4-7/8” fillet, I don’t think it’ll be a problem. Also made a ball stake (I think that’s the correct term) from a 1-1/4” b7 bolt. Cleaned it up on the belt grinder, but I kinda wish I’d made it sit up higher from the face.
  25. Gary Mulkey

    Meteorite Damascus

    Yes. It's 1084. It wasn't that dark right out of the etch. I did a coffee soak to get the dark color.
  26. Brian Dougherty

    Finished my forge

    If that 6 minutes was from first lighting to "cherry red", it's not too bad. If the forge was already hot, that is pretty slow. What kind of insulation did you use? 2 Burners in that size of a forge should be more than you need if it is insulated well. BTW, "cherry red" would generally be considered pretty cold for forging. Color is a difficult way to convey temperature from one person to the next, but you'll spend most of your time in the orange to yellow range.
  27. Brian Dougherty

    Meteorite Damascus

    Wow, was that 1084 powder you used the canoe? It really blackened up nicely.
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